brandon & marianne

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Kate Winslet as Marianne Dashwood & Alan Rickman as Colonel Brandon in  “Sense and Sensibility”.

“I remember being so intimidated by him when we worked together when I was 19 , because he had such a powerful and commanding presence . And that voice! Oh, that voice …“                                                               Kate Winslet tribute to Alan Rickman

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” … that Marianne found her own happiness in forming [Col. Brandon’s] was equally the persuasion and delight of each observing friend.  Marianne could never love by halves; and her whole heart became, in time, as much devoted to her husband as it had once been to Willoughby.”

Sense & Sensibility, volume 3, chapter 14.

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Colonel Brandon was now as happy, as all those who best loved him, believed he deserved to be;—in Marianne he was consoled for every past affliction;—her regard and her society restored his mind to animation, and his spirits to cheerfulness; and that Marianne found her own happiness in forming his, was equally the persuasion and delight of each observing friend.

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“Sense and Sensibility” (1995)

Alan Rickman as Colonel Brandon…making of

Sense and Sensibility is a film directed by Ang Lee and based on Jane Austen’s 1811 novel of the same name. Emma Thompson wrote the script and stars as Elinor Dashwood. Kate Winslet plays her younger sister Marianne. The Dashwood sisters are forced to seek financial security through marriage. Hugh Grant and Alan Rickman play their respective suitors.

natscha86  asked:

So basically everyone in Austen novels has some faults (I think that's what makes them so fun to read). But what would you say are the faults of the male heros? I'm having an especially hard time with Henry Tilney, maybe he is making to much fun of people?

Colonel Brandon: Like Marianne, rather too much romanticism in his nature. Once he’s settled and happy he’s fine, but he shows an unfortunate tendency to wallow privately in his misery, even if he continues to go about his business in other respects just fine. (As Anne Elliot points out, men have the activity of their careers to draw them out of themselves after a disappointment, whereas she and Marianne have nothing to stop them from dwelling on their pain except the exertions of their own characters for enduring. Anne…does okay, but it kind of eats away at her, anyhow. Marianne is immediately consumed by it.) Also the duel with Willoughby is so pointless and unnecessary. Bloodshed and conflict as recompense for men’s honour is barbaric, and Austen (via Elinor’s inward eye-rolling) seems to feel this.

Edward Ferrars: Not aware enough to realize what he was doing to Elinor, when he thought it was only his own feelings he was risking in liking her when he knew himself to be engaged to Lucy Steele. Of course this is like the perfect storm of Elinor’s self-control making it extra-difficult for Edward to be clued in to how she’s really feeling, but still, he ought to have at least considered that if he was falling in love with this lovely young woman, she might be feeling more than friendly, too.

Edmund Bertram: He gets hero-worshiped by Fanny for simply not being a negligent dick to her like most of his family; but then once the first young gentlewoman who isn’t related to him turns up he is charmed by her and all too happy to neglect to notice that Fanny is dying inside. A recurring theme with some Austen heroes is that when it comes to the feelings of ladies, they are dense. On the one hand, yes, courtship rules about keeping composure and distance compounded this problem, but on the other hand…c’mon, lads.

George Knightley: Condescending and creepily paternalistic in the tone he takes with Emma, sometimes. Yes, Emma needs someone to stand up to her, but with the age-difference and him knowing her since she was born and then kind of replacing Mrs. Weston and even her own ineffectual but loving father with the guidance of himself as a ‘friend’ and then as a Husband just…eh. Also, again, it’s not like Emma is spoiled for choice among the eligible men of Highbury.

Fitzwilliam Darcy: Proud, obviously. His ivory-tower awkwardness and initial sneering tone are what place him at a disadvantage in society; and while it’s all very well that he strives to change for Elizabeth and be better to other people, progress is not a straight line so I doubt even after the events of the novel he’s Mr. Perfect all of a sudden. And then there’s nothing like marriage to really acquaint oneself with the flaws, large and small, of one’s partner.

Henry Tilney: He does make light of people (and even mocks Catherine,) but I’d say his personal flaws might also include a kind of smug superior sense of pride, rather like Darcy, but without the awkwardness. He teases Catherine, yes, and it’s never really mean-spirited, but she’s not on his level, so it’s not really a fair fight. Also he doesn’t seriously start to love her until he becomes aware (thanks to her artless inability to conceal anything,) that she’s really into him. So the flattery of her attention is what charms him, which…I don’t know how I feel about that, exactly. He’s a funny guy, and in the end his care and concern for Catherine is genuine, but up until that turning-point of maturity he kind of reads like that guy in one of your first-year uni classes who has a smart answer for anything and knows exactly how clever he is and wants you all to know it, too…and it kind of makes you want to punch him in the mouth.

Frederick Wentworth: YOU IDIOT. YOU COULD HAVE HAD ANNE ELLIOT BACK JUST TWO YEARS AFTER SHE BROKE YOUR ENGAGEMENT BUT NOOOO YOU HAD TO BE A SCORNFUL DILLHOLE FILLED WITH BITTER REPROACH AND HOLLOW PRIDE AND WASTE SIX YEARS OF EVERYBODY’S TIME BEFORE YOU COME BLOWING BACK THROUGH TOWN AND DRAG THAT POOR WOMAN’S BATTERED HEART THROUGH HELL BY FLIRTING WITH OTHER GIRLS TO THE EXTENT THAT–WHOOPSIE–YOU MAY HAVE ENTERED A DE FACTO ENGAGEMENT WITH ONE OF THEM WITHOUT QUITE REALIZING IT. WAY TO FUCK UP, YOU FUCK-UP. YOU ARE A TEXTBOOK EXAMPLE OF HOW TO CUT OFF YOUR NOSE TO SPITE YOUR FACE, CAPTAIN, AND I HOPE YOU HAVE LEARNED A LESSON.

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Alan Rickman & Amanda Ooms as Franz Anton Mesmer & Maria Theresa Paradies in “Mesmer”, Alan Rickman & Sigourney Weaver as Alex Hughes & Linda in “Snow Cake”, Alan Rickman & Sharleen Spiteri in the music video by Texas entitled “In Demand”, Alan Rickman & Rachel Hurd-Wood as Antoine & Laura Richis in “Perfume: The Story of a Murderer”, with  Geraldine Somerville as Severus Snape & Lily Potter in “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2″, Alan Rickman & Helena Bonham Carter as Severus Snape & Bellatrix Lestrange in “Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince“, with Lindy Booth as Eli Michaelson & Beth Chapman in “Nobel Son”, Alan Rickman & Kate Winslet as Colonel Brandon & Marianne  Dashwood in “Sense and Sensibility”, Alan Rickman & Emma Thompson as Harry & Karen inLove Actually”                                                 


  • Colonel Brandon: *brings hot flowers that he prob tended himself, and prob despite the fact that roses are freaking hard to grow and it cost his gardener 'Best Bloom' in the local flower show because he actually puts thought into what she likes and thinks she deserves the best he can give, also supplies her with music because he knows what she's capable of*
  • Willoughby: *rips up some flowers from some random field without any thought except to get into Marianne's pantaloons coz he's a pig*
  • Marianne: Dang. Who do I choose?