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The world’s most detailed scan of the brain’s internal wiring has been produced by scientists at Cardiff University.

Not only does the scan show the direction of the messaging, but also the density of the brain’s wiring. Conventional scans clearly show lesions - areas of damage - in the brain of MS patients.But this advanced scan, showing axonal density, can help explain how the lesions affect motor and cognitive pathways - which can trigger movement problems and extreme fatigue.

Prof Derek Jones, CUBRIC’s director, said it was like getting hold of the Hubble telescope when you’ve been using binoculars. “The promise for researchers is that we can start to look at structure and function together for the first time,” he said.

  • Me: Come on brain, write.
  • Brain: I know what's going to happen next!
  • Me: That's fantastic, but for the sake of pacing can we work up to that point?
  • Brain: Yeah. We could. Or, hear me out, I can tell you every single detail of the next part and we won't be able to focus on the current point of the story and we'll get really frustrated because we know where we want to go but don't know how to get to it.
  • Me:
  • Me: ... Go on
When you begin to feel negative feelings bubbling up to the surface, be mindful of them, for they will not change anything but your own thoughts and wellbeing. Ask yourself; are they worth the extra energy? Do you even deserve to feel such negative emotions? No, you don’t. So try not to let them drag you backwards.
—  Nicole Addison @thepowerwithin

Being fluent in two languages might change how you perceive time

  • Being bilingual already has a long list of benefits. Research suggests that it boosts creativity and memory, strengthens multitasking and slows down the onset of dementia.
  • But in case these benefits don’t already outweigh the monotony of memorizing grammar structures and vocabulary lists, here’s one more: Bilingualism seems to give us a more nuanced perception of time.
  • Scientists asked a group of Spanish-Swedish bilinguals to guess how much time passed after watching a container fill up with liquid or a line grow on a screen.
  • When they asked the question using the word “duración” (spanish for “duration”), participants adjusted their time estimates according to the volume in the container, but not the length of the line on their screen.
  • When scientists used the word “tid” (Swedish for “time”), estimates were shaped by how long the line grew, but not by how much the containers were filled.
  • Here’s why that’s cool: Despite our frenzied morning commutes or our 15-minute lunch breaks, the way time works is, in some ways, up to our culture and imagination. Read more (5/3/17)

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