bragdon

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Claude Bragdon (American, 1866 – 1946)

  • Mathematical Abstraction No. 5 “Study in complementaries”, circa 1940
  • Design for Decorative Lighting, circa 1925
  • Mathematical Abstraction No. 14 “The sun by day and the moon by night”, circa 1940
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A demographic crisis looms over Maine, the oldest and whitest state in the U.S. with one of the country’s lowest birth rates.

Employers are already feeling the effects on Maine’s workforce as they struggle to fill positions with “old Mainers” — long-time residents in a state where many take pride in their deep family roots, especially along the shores of Washington County.

Here in the rugged, eastern edges of the U.S., dotted with evergreens and wood-shingled houses, many make a living from the waters of Down East Maine, including Annie Sokoloski, an office manager in Steuben, Maine, for Lobster Trap, a wholesale lobster dealer. Working in seafood goes back generations in her family.

“My grandmother forced me to go into the fish factory and pack sardines,” says Sokoloski, who recalls working as a sardine packer while on break from school. “She told me anytime that I thought about not having an education I needed to remember that day.”

These days, Sokoloski says she still remembers other lessons: “You need to get away from here to make anything for yourself” she remembers her grandparents telling her when she was growing up.

Maine’s Immigrants Boost Workforce Of Whitest, Oldest State In U.S.

Photos: Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

Claude Bragdon, architect and geometrist wrote in the 1920’s: “The unique, archetypal character of these regular polyhedrons of three-dimensional space has been recognized from the most ancient times. Among the playthings of the infant Bacchus were dice in the form of the five platonic solids, the implications being that upon these patterns all things in the universe are built”.

A ROMAN GLASS GAMING DICE, circa 2nd Century A.D. 
Deep blue-green in color, the large twenty-sided dice is incised with a symbol on each of its faces.

White nationalists groups plan to be 'more active than ever'

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — Emboldened and proclaiming victory after a bloody weekend in Virginia, white nationalists are planning more demonstrations to promote their agenda after the violence that left a woman dead and dozens injured.

The University of Florida said white provocateur Richard Spencer, whose appearances sometimes stoke unrest, is seeking permission to speak there next month. White nationalist Preston Wiginton had said he was planning a “White Lives Matter” rally at Texas A&M University in September, but the university later said it has been cancelled .

Also, a neo-Confederate group had asked the state of Virginia for permission to rally at a monument to Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee in Richmond on Sept. 16, but later cancelled its plans. Organizer Bragdon Bowling told media outlets Tuesday that Americans for Richmond Monument Preservation is pulling its permit request for the Sept. 16 rally in light of the violence in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Bowling filed the permit request weeks before the Charlottesville rally.

Other events are likely to be held.

“We’re going to be more active than ever before,” Matthew Heimbach, a white nationalist leader, said Monday.

James Alex Fields Jr., a young man who was said to idolize Adolf Hitler and Nazi Germany in high school, was charged with killing a woman by slamming a car into a group of counter-protesters at a white nationalist rally Sunday in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Fields, 20, who recently moved to Ohio from his home state of Kentucky, was held without bail on murder charges. He was photographed at the rally behind a shield bearing the emblem of the white nationalist Vanguard America, though the group denied he was a member.

Two state troopers also died Sunday when their helicopter crashed during an effort to contain the violence.

The U.S. Justice Department said it will review the violence, and Attorney General Jeff Sessions told ABC the death of counter-protester Heather Heyer, 32, met the definition of domestic terrorism.

White nationalists said they were undaunted.

Heimbach, who said he was pepper-sprayed during the melee in Charlottesville, called the event Saturday “an absolute stunning victory” for the far right because of the large number of supporters who descended on the city to decry plans to remove a statue of Lee.

Hundreds of white nationalists, white supremacists, neo-Nazis, Ku Klux Klan members and others were involved, by some estimates, in what Heimbach, leader of the Traditionalist Workers Party, called the nation’s biggest such event in a decade or more. Even more opponents turned out, and the two sides clashed violently.

A neo-Nazi website that helped promote the gathering said there will be more events soon.

“We are going to start doing this nonstop. Across the country,” said the site, which internet domain host GoDaddy said it was shutting down after it mocked the woman killed in Charlottesville.

The head of the National Socialist Movement, Jeff Schoep, said Charlottesville was a “really good” white nationalist event that was being overshadowed by the deaths. “Any time someone loses their life it’s unfortunate,” he said.

He blamed the violence on inadequate police protection and counter-demonstrators and said he doubts white nationalists will be deterred from attending more such demonstrations.

Preserving memorials to the Old South has become an animating force for the white nationalist movement, not because all members are Southern, Schoep said, but because adherents see the drive to remove such monuments as part of a larger, anti-white crusade.

“It’s an assault on American freedoms. Today it’s Confederate monuments. Tomorrow it may be the Constitution or the American flag,” Schoep said.

At the University of Florida, where Spencer has asked to speak, President W. Kent Fuchs called the events in Virginia “deplorable” but indicated school officials might be unable to block his appearance.

“While this speaker’s views do not align with our values as an institution, we must follow the law, upholding the First Amendment not to discriminate based on content and provide access to a public space,” Fuchs said in a message on the university’s Facebook page.

Auburn University spent nearly $30,000 in legal fees in an unsuccessful attempt to prevent Spencer from speaking on its campus in Alabama in April.

Jay Reeves, The Associated Press

New York City is launching the latest salvo in its never-ending war on rats.

City officials are ramping up efforts to teach regular New Yorkers how to make their streets, businesses and gardens less hospitable to rodents — in other words, to see their neighborhood the way a health inspector would.

When Caroline Bragdon, a rat expert with the city’s Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, walks through the East Village, she’s not looking at the people or the storefronts. Her eyes point down, at the place where the sidewalk meets the buildings and the street. “If you look really carefully, you can even see their hairs,” Bragdon says, pointing to a little hole in the sidewalk next to a sewer grate. “When we see something like this, what we say to each other is, ‘This catch basin is hot.’ You know, 'This is ratty.’ ”

Rats! New York City Tries To Drain Rodent 'Reservoirs’

Photo credit: Ludovic Bertron/Flickr