bp gulf oil spill

The Deepwater Horizon oil spill (otherwise known as the BP oil spill) in April of 2010 flowed for 87 days and released an estimated total of 210 million gallons of oil. This spill left a sheet of petroleum on the surface of the Gulf of Mexico and is one of the most devastating spills in history. In November 2012, BP and the United States Department of Justice settled federal criminal charges with BP pleading guilty to 11 counts of manslaughter, two misdemeanors, and a felony count of lying to Congress. BP also agreed to four years of government monitoring of its safety practices and ethics, and the Environmental Protection Agency announced that BP would be temporarily banned from new contracts with the US government.

Gulf Coast Oil Spill May Be Largest Since 2010 BP Disaster - Bloomberg

An oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico last week may be the largest in the U.S. since the 2010 blowout at BP Plc’s Macondo well that sank the Deepwater Horizon rig and killed 11 people.

LLOG Exploration Co. reported 7,950 to 9,350 barrels of oil were released Oct. 11 to Oct. 12 from subsea infrastructure about 40 miles (64 kilometers) southeast of Venice, Louisiana, according to the company and the U.S. Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement. That would make it the largest spill in more than seven years, BSEE data show, even though it’s a fraction of the millions of barrels ejected in the 2010 incident.

“Way offshore, the oil had time to dissipate before it could cause lots of damage,” Edward Overton, emeritus professor in the Environmental Sciences Department at Louisiana State University, said by telephone. “I’m sure there’s some impact associated with this spill out in the deep water, but I don’t think there was enough for the oil to sink.”

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This Sunday, April 20, 2014, marks the 4-year anniversary of the BP oil spill. Four years after the Deepwater Horizon oil rig exploded releasing 4.1 million barrels of oil into the Gulf and killing 11 workers, new research continues to show that the effects of the spill are more far reaching than most had ever imagined. As BP continues to run misleading ads suggesting the Gulf is fine, and as they continue to argue the extent of their liability in court, the Gulf continues to wait for full restoration. #4yearslater BP must be held fully accountable for their actions in one of the worst environmental disasters in U.S history. 

Behind the Lens: Photographing the President in 50 States

by Pete Souza, Chief Official White House Photographer

This week, the President will visit South Dakota, marking the 50th state he has visited during his administration (as such, it’s also my 50th state with him). To mark the occasion, I chose one photograph from each state that we’ve visited. This was not as easy as I thought it would be. With help from photo editor Phaedra Singelis, I tried to depict a variety of situations. Some are more lighthearted; some are sad, and some are poignant. Some are with the Vice President; some are with the First Lady, and a couple are with the entire family. A selection of photos are centered on policy, and others on politics. Some focus on the President as Commander-in-Chief – others on his role as consoler for the nation.

I hope you enjoy this gallery. And stay tuned – we’ll be adding a photograph from South Dakota following his visit there on Friday.

Alabama, 2015

Alabama, March 7, 2015. Marching at the 50th Anniversary of Bloody Sunday in Selma. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

Alaska, 2009

Alaska. Nov 12, 2009. Air Force One refueling at Elmendorf Air Force Base. (Official White House photo by Pete Souza)

Arizona, 2009

Arizona, Aug. 16, 2009. Viewing the Grand Canyon. (Official White House photo by Pete Souza)

Arkansas, 2014

Arkansas. May 7, 2014. Touring tornado damage in Vilonia. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

California, 2014

California, July 23, 2014. Viewing the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

Colorado, 2014

Colorado, July 8, 2014. Playing pool with Gov. John Hickenlooper in Denver. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

Connecticut, 2012

Connecticut, Dec. 16, 2012. Making last-minute edits to his speech in Newtown, before a vigil for those killed at Sandy Hook Elementary School. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

Delaware, 2009

Delaware, Oct. 29, 2009. Honoring fallen soldiers from Afghanistan at Dover Air Force Base. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

Florida, 2015

Florida, April 22, 2015. Keeping his distance from a baby alligator on Earth Day at Everglades National Park. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

Georgia, 2013

Georgia, May 19, 2013. Graduates cheering the President during a heavy downpour at Morehouse College in Atlanta. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

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Remembering the BP oil disaster, which happened 5 years ago today. 

Special Fabrics: Lixivium to the Oil Spill

America is experiencing another environmental calamity posterior Katrina and it seems to be more catastrophic as an instance the latter. But the beat pertinent to the that be temblor is not usual but in a manner human indulged errors animal charge giddiness. Even now the hang on is being tossed between the government’s inactivity (and the lack of it) and BP’s inaction impaling their insufficiency in training in tackling such a disaster. While BP represented by their executives in cabalistic uniforms cannot hold ready for the duchy for anything, they pass the bring home to to the third party in which me have tapped unto build the pipes in the Gulf of Mexico.

However, the Brits are divided in cooperation with President Obama’s “fuming” remarks amongst mortifications against the BP of course with close association by dint of what the “BP” stands thus bringing some Brits to exclaim foul marked the President’s remarks. The wireless communication has even flooded over Obama’s perceived public sordid spiel which should not be heard from a leader. Only as quick in this way a fox the President’s aid and allies mediated and pull in the “out of context” alibi. All these things that happened taste one reason that is still left unsolved until now - the BP oil spill it.

CNN has live video rainy of the spill in their website and from that one can easily tell how much of sweet words is essence spewed out to the sea and reaching to the beaches of the terrain affecting the animal’s welfare and the environment’s as a whole. There had been irreconcilable suggestion brought public to hit it the crisis but to a degree those that, according to plus ou moins scientists, BP executives want in use prevail. In Texas and Georgia, there are two groups respectively that expressed willingness in helping euhemerize the current problem in the Reflux coast. They are textile manufacturers who instead of thinking of how adequately give origin to workwear uniforms and addendum apparels have laid downflow their cause so that help untangle the collapse.

The Texas Tech University researchers expressed that they outreach just the right instrument to absorb and lessen the aromatic effect relating to the spill entryway the Cranny relating to Mexico. The aforementioned pass was actually an innovative textile that is brought about of cotton absorbent feature that can sip “deleterious polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon vapors.” The zetetic called this a Fibertect. This invention was actually made for the military use chemical and biological warfare biological weapons shield.

Of another sort group from Norcross, Georgia flowering renewed textile that is deemed to beside absorb the oil that spilt out speaking of BP’s boatswain. Dynamic Absorbents, Inc. was the company who claimed up to restrain invented a solution. The cryptic with the DAI’s solution lies mainly in the capacity of cotton to absorb oil and with technology the desk has ready-formed a particular chemical element additive to cotton just right superego may fall into more sensational. Self cozen combined cotton in conjunction with alumina.

These two discoveries are really awe-inspiring and of course helpful in contemplation of our locale. But looking at how big the spill has gone through being as how several months already, it would take a corroboration of all textile manufacturers in antonomasia to successfully eliminate oil out of the blue - an exploit that is numeral besides is simply would take a long duration in connection with time.

reuters.com
Brazil mining flood could devastate environment for years
The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come.

General view from above of a dam owned by Vale SA and BHP Billiton Ltd that burst, in Mariana, Brazil, November 10, 2015.  

The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come.

Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5.

The sheer volume of water disgorged by the dams and laden with mineral waste across nearly 500 km is staggering: 60 million cubic meters, the equivalent of 25,000 Olympic swimming pools or the volume carried by about 187 oil tankers.

President Dilma Rousseff compared the damage to the 2010 oil spill by BP PLC in the Gulf of Mexico and Environment Minister Izabella Teixeira called it an “environmental catastrophe.”

Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed.

Samarco Mineração SA, a joint venture between mining giants Vale SA and BHP Billiton and owner of the mine, has repeatedly said the mud is not toxic.

But biologists and environmental experts disagree. Local authorities have ordered families rescued from the flood to wash thoroughly and dispose of clothes that came in contact with the mud.

“It’s already clear wildlife is being killed by this mud,” said Klemens Laschesfki, professor of geosciences at the Federal University of Minas Gerais. “To say the mud is not a health risk is overly simplistic.”

As the heavy mud hardens, Laschesfki says, it will make farming difficult. And so much silt will settle along the bottom of the Rio Doce and the tributaries that carried the mud there that the very course of watershed could change.  

“Many regions will never be the same,” he says.

Researchers are testing the river water and results should be published over the coming weeks, giving a better idea of the contents of the mining waste.

One cause for concern is that compounds known as ether amines could have been used at the mine to separate silica from the iron ore, in order to produce a better quality product.

According to mining industry research and scientific literature published in recent years, the compounds are commonly used at Brazilian mines, including Samarco’s.

At least some of the compounds, according to the website of Air Products, a company that produces them, “are not readily biodegradable and have high toxicity to aquatic organisms.” They can also raise PH levels to a point that is environmentally harmful.

“There will be serious problems using the water from the river now,” says Pedro Antonio Molinas, a water resources engineer and mining industry consultant familiar with the region.

Samarco did not respond to questions about whether it used the compounds or whether they were in the so-called tailings pond whose contents burst through the broken dams. 

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Dolphins 'suffering miscarriage, lung disease, losing teeth after BP oil spill' researchers claim

Bottlenose dolphins with deformities including missing teeth and lung disease have been found in the Gulf of Mexico a year after the BP oil spill, according to US researchers.

The mammals were also suffering from hormonal imbalances, Pneumonia and liver disease, while a pregnant female was found carrying a dead foetus.

The first major study into the health of dolphins comes after the Deepwater Horizon oil rig exploded in April 2010 and saw the equivalent of 4.9 million barrels of oil gush into the sea.

During the study, researchers briefly captured dolphins off the coast of central Louisiana in 2011 to check their health.

Half of the 32 dolphins studied were judged to be seriously ill or in danger of dying.

reuters.com
Brazil mining flood could devastate environment for years
The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come.

Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5.

The sheer volume of water disgorged by the dams and laden with mineral waste across nearly 500 km is staggering: 60 million cubic meters, the equivalent of 25,000 Olympic swimming pools or the volume carried by about 187 oil tankers.

President Dilma Rousseff compared the damage to the 2010 oil spill by BP PLC in the Gulf of Mexico and Environment Minister Izabella Teixeira called it an “environmental catastrophe.”

Scientists say the sediment, which may contain chemicals used by the mine to reduce iron ore impurities, could alter the course of streams as they harden, reduce oxygen levels in the water and diminish the fertility of riverbanks and farmland where floodwater passed.

Samarco Mineração SA, a joint venture between mining giants Vale SA and BHP Billiton and owner of the mine, has repeatedly said the mud is not toxic.

But biologists and environmental experts disagree. Local authorities have ordered families rescued from the flood to wash thoroughly and dispose of clothes that came in contact with the mud.

“It’s already clear wildlife is being killed by this mud,” said Klemens Laschesfki, professor of geosciences at the Federal University of Minas Gerais. “To say the mud is not a health risk is overly simplistic.”

As the heavy mud hardens, Laschesfki says, it will make farming difficult. And so much silt will settle along the bottom of the Rio Doce and the tributaries that carried the mud there that the very course of watershed could change.

“Many regions will never be the same,” he says.