boxed bird

anonymous asked:

Can birds do drugs?

If you mean “can birds knowingly go out and acquire illegal psychologically modifying chemicals for recreational use” I would say definitely not. However, birds can and have been observed getting totally sauced on various delicious fermented fruits.

Waxwings and robins will gorge on thawed berries until some of them are so inebriated that Environment Yukon has taken to keeping the worst off in tiny bird drunk tanks until they’re sober enough to leave. Inebriated zebra finches sing like they’re at terrible karaoke nightDrunk parrots periodically fill animal hospitals in AustraliaA flock of intoxicated starlings stopped traffic in Austria after running into numerous cars. THE LIST GOES ON.

As mentioned in the video, hilarious to hear about but in reality it is causing a major problem; these “drunk” birds have a hard time avoiding head-on collisions with buildings and other man-made paraphernalia. Moral of the story: don’t drink and fly, kids. Unless you’re a bat. Because it turns out you don’t need to pass a breathalyzer test to fly with sonar.

anonymous asked:

Hello! I recently discovered this blog and have spent hours looking over your amazing art! I know you're very busy but do you think you could draw human tfp soundwave one more time ? Doing soundwave stuff ?He's my favorite and your style makes me love him 10000x more!! (Your laser beak is amazing btw)

Boats and Birds [ Music Box Version ]
Gregory and the Hawk
Boats and Birds [ Music Box Version ]

Boats and Birds [ Music Box Version ] - Gregory and the Hawk

Another great music box by joshuasaundersmusic!

This time, one of my favorite songs, Boats and Birds. I play this music while I’m working on little mini stories. It’s very relaxing and definitely one of my favorite music boxes Joshua has made.

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Big gentle bott

look I can draw robots :’)))

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Can’t believe it so happy! I was given this old box of bird skulls and eggs by a parents friend who inherited it! Birds I’ve identified: 2 razorbill, guillemot, great black backed gull, teal, gannet, jackdaw, carrion crow, kestrel/sparrowhawk, blackbird, mute swan, shag, pheasant and house sparrow. 
There are loads of beautiful British bird eggs which are over 80 years old with some being even older. Please note I live in the UK where there is no migratory bird act and the age of the eggs makes them fine to own.

Fun fact: before knowing Kageyama’s name I called him potato head.

Bird-Themed Questions!

Send birds to my ask box~

•Albatross: Do you feel the weight of life’s burdens often?

•Kite: Do you prefer to be graceful or vivacious?

•Mockingbird: Do you pretend to be something you’re not?

•Cardinal: Are you protective?

•Chickadee: Are you outgoing or more introverted?

•Dove: Are you spiritual?

•Snowy Owl: Are you a morning or night person?

•Raven: Do you consider yourself intelligent?

•Emu: Are you athletic?

•Vulture: Do you feel you’re misunderstood?

•Hummingbird: Are you always eating?

•Quetzal: How would you describe yourself in 3 words?

•Bower Bird: Are you creative?

•Pelican: Ocean or mountains?

•Dovekie: Name someone you feel very close to.

•Barn Owl: Are you in love?

•Ivory-Billed Woodpecker: Do you feel alone often?

•Peacock: What is your favorite color and why?

•Starling: City or country?

•Wood Thrush: Can you sing/play an instrument?

•Red Knot: Do you like to travel?

•Catbird: Are you good at speaking your mind?

•Falcon: Do you like thrills?

•Osprey: Are you persistent?

•Swan: Ideal date?

•Crow: Are you close to your family?

•Penguin: Hot or cold?

•Puffin: Are you a goof-off?

•Macaw: Name a fictional character you relate to/feel close to.

•Mynah: Go to music, press shuffle and say the first three songs that come up.

•Japanese Long-Tailed Tit: Favorite Pokemon/fictional animal?

•Blue-Footed Booby: What’s your sense of humor like?

•Swallow: Selfie?

Sandra Bullock to Star in Post-Apocalyptic Thriller ‘Bird Box’

Sandra Bullock is set to star in Netflix’s post-apocalyptic thriller Bird Box.

Danish helmer Susanne Bier will direct from a screenplay written by Arrival’s Eric Heisserer.

Based on a 2014 novel by Josh Malerman, the story is set in the near future, where a mother (Bullock) and her two young children are among a small group of survivors after a mysterious alien force has driven the world’s population to deadly violence. The three must make their way on a terrifying journey — 20 miles in a rowboat — while blindfolded, with nothing to rely on but the mother’s wits and the children’s trained ears.

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On an overcast late-spring afternoon, a group of bird lovers from the Earth Conservation Corps are in a boat on Washington, D.C.’s Anacostia River, and point out an osprey circling overhead. “This is like their summer vacation spot and where they have their young,” says Bob Nixon, in the boat. “Then they spend most of their lives in the Amazon.”

It wasn’t so long ago that the ospreys – and other large birds of prey known as raptors – avoided this place. The Anacostia, often called Washington’s forgotten river, was too polluted to support wildlife. Nearly nine miles long, the river flows from Maryland into the Potomac, but became infamous in the second half of the 20th century as one of the most neglected, trash-choked waterways in the United States – a blighted river amid blighted neighborhoods.

But in recent years, the Anacostia has seen a rebirth. Thanks to the efforts of the Earth Conservation Corps — which Nixon, a filmmaker and conservationist, started 25 years ago — there are now four osprey nests on the river’s Frederick Douglass Memorial Bridge. “We’ve turned this into a raptor hotel,” says Nixon.

In 1994, two years into the Earth Conservation Corps’ work, Washington was in the midst of a crack epidemic, with a murder rate topping 400 a year. At that low point in the city’s recent history, Nixon had the idea to bring the bald eagle back to the nation’s capital. It had disappeared decades earlier.

Between 1994 and 1998, members of the corps raised and released 16 bald eagles. Anthony Satterthwaite and Burrell Duncan fed the very first eaglets – hatched in Wisconsin and delivered to Washington to start the reintroduction program – by hiding in the woods and sending fish via a clothesline pulley system into the boxes where the baby birds were kept high up in a poplar tree. They couldn’t let the young birds see them, for fear that they’d imprint on humans.

When the birds were old enough, the boxes were opened.

“To see these birds fly away from this box they were in for three months – just joy, man,” says Satterthwaite. “Just joy.”

They named the eagles in memory of their fallen friends — Monique Johnson and the other corps members they’d lost over the years.

“We wasn’t supposed to live to see the age of 21,” says Satterthwaite. “We was just as endangered as this majestic bird. So it became very powerful and we connected the two, and that’s why we started our raptor education program with Rodney Stotts.”

This year, there are three eagle’s nests in Washington. A naming contest was held for one of the eaglets, which hatched March 15 in southwest Washington. The winning name: Spirit. Its parents are Liberty and Justice.

“We no longer have to name them after dead colleagues,” says Nixon.

In Washington, D.C., A Program In Which Birds And People Lift Each Other Up

Photos: Claire Harbage/NPR