boundary country

Nation states are a relatively new concept; migration is as old as humanity. Borders seek to regulate and restrict that basic human custom for the distinct purpose of excluding some and privileging others. They discriminate between all people with the express intention of then being able to discriminate against some people. They do not simply set boundaries for countries, but are metaphors for the boundaries of how we might think about other human beings. Immigrants are not the problem. Borders are.
theguardian.com
End all immigration controls – they’re a sign we value money more than people | Gary Younge
Barriers are lifted for capital while, for the global poor, borders are made ever tougher to cross, says Guardian columnist Gary Younge
By Gary Younge

The map of my utopian world has no borders. I believe in the free movement of people. As a principle, I think we should all be able to roam the planet and live, love and create where we wish.

As borders have become tougher for people, they have all but been lifted for capital. Money can travel the globe virtually without restriction, in search of regulations that are weaker and labour that is cheaper.

When it does, it often displaces people: sucking investment and resources from one place at the flick of a switch; shutting down factories and shifting them to the other side of the world; or introducing automation that renders some professions obsolete. But those who find their lives turned upside down by the free movement of capital are often prevented from moving country and looking for work. People should have at least the same rights – or more, since humans are more valuable than money.

It is a fact, rarely stated but generally acknowledged and accepted, that the global poor should not be allowed to travel. That’s most of the world. As such, from the refugee camp in Calais to the rickety vessels on the Mediterranean, from Trump’s wall to the Berlin wall, the border stands as an ultimate point of confrontation in the broader dystopia we have made possible.

Nation states are a relatively new concept; migration is as old as humanity. Borders seek to regulate and restrict that basic human custom for the distinct purpose of excluding some and privileging others. They discriminate between all people with the express intention of then being able to discriminate against some people. They do not simply set boundaries for countries, but are metaphors for the boundaries of how we might think about other human beings. Immigrants are not the problem. Borders are.

Tony needs a hug? Yes, but...

Tony Stark needs a hug?  Yeah, he does. But never forget that Tony Stark is strong as steel underneath the armor and the frail flesh and the troubled mind. Tony Stark has come back again and again, from childhood trauma, from the horror of his captivity and torture, from betrayal after betrayal by those he loved, from the ashes of his own mistakes – and has grown and learned and become a better person for it.

In “Civil War” he’s STILL becoming a better person – he’s trying like hell to keep his team together and out of jail or worse (even though he’s stepped away from the Avengers and become an “active non-combatant”).  He sees the wide view of the world – not just America, because Tony the futurist is a global citizen – and agrees that beings who have the destructive force of nuclear weapons need to submit to some form of oversight, and that such beings do not have the unilateral right to enter other countries’ boundaries.

His mistake is not this – because it IS the right thing to do, and the “New Avengers” ARE a mess, with no oversight and – as we see in Lagos – the capacity to do real harm when they make errors. His mistake is that in his guilt over Ultron, he puts his trust in the wrong people (Ross and his minions) – and he learns this very quickly.  Tony Stark is one of the smartest people in the world - and as soon as he sees evidence that he was wrong, that he put his faith in the wrong people, he sets out to make things right. He even admits he was wrong - which is something NO ONE ELSE in this movie does. (Steve’s patronizing letter does not, even though Steve is wrong throughout most of the movie…)  Tony Stark knows and mourns for every life that was needlessly lost because of the Avengers’ actions - he’s NOT a soldier, and the concept of collateral damage is anathema to this reformed weapons maker. He’s grown, as a human being, way past that. He knows the life of one innocent person - like the young man whose mother confronted him - is worth a million times more than the “freedom” of the Avengers.

The only one who bolsters Tony, and who, at the end, even though he’s the most cruelly injured of all, speaks wisdom and truth, is Rhodey. Tony made the choice to follow the Accords because of his emotions, and ended up being right (even though, as usual, Bad People with Agendas let him down).  But Rhodey followed the Accords because he KNEW it was ethically the right thing to do, right from the beginning. He didn’t do it just to follow his friend Tony – like the clown-circus gang that ended up following Steve apparently just for the heck of it or because, hey, it’s Cap.  Rhodey did it because he knew in his soul that the Avengers DO need some form of oversight, and that they can’t keep trampling into other countries and cowboying around and causing huge collateral damage and loss of life without answering to the world. Rhodey’s speech at the end is like a balm to Tony’s soul, and you can see it.

Tony Stark is in pain, and he’s been wounded to his very soul – but he will rise again.  Because he always does. That’s why so many of us love him – he’s a metaphor not only for science and technology, but for humanity –trying and failing and trying again; falling down and getting up again, only to fall again; nursing our wounds both physical and emotional, learning as we go.  There’s courage in that, and heroism, and grace.

Instant Replay

Author: liketolaugh
Summary: In a last-ditch attempt to keep Sasuke in Konoha, Kakashi goes looking for an Uchiha who went outside the Hidden Countries thirty years ago - Uchiha Yuu.


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“My darling. I’m waiting for you. How long is the day in the dark? Or a week? The fire is gone, and I’m horribly cold. I really should drag myself outside but then there’d be the sun. I’m afraid I waste the light on the paintings, not writing these words. We die. We die rich with lovers and tribes, tastes we have swallowed, bodies we’ve entered and swum up like rivers. Fears we’ve hidden in - like this wretched cave. I want all this marked on my body. We are the real countries. Not boundaries drawn on maps with the names of powerful men. I know you’ll come carry me out to the Palace of Winds. That’s what I’ve wanted: to walk in such a place with you. With friends, on an earth without maps. The lamp has gone out and I’m writing in the darkness.”

The Iconic Final Scene Of “The English Patient”,1996,Directed By Anthony Minghella

Living at the top of the world: Legendary snow leopards are rarely seen in the wild, as they live high in the mountains of Central Asia. Although the cats freely cross the international boundaries of 12 countries, their secretive behavior and remote habitat among the highest mountains in the world add to their mystery. (photo source)

“When you cross the boundary of a country then you become aware that you have been living in a prison. You only come to know when you cross the boundary. Then you know that the prison is a big prison. But you are a part of a prison; it is not a country. No country is yet free because a single country cannot be free: either the whole world can be free or not. These are just small or big prisons.

Inside the prison you don’t become aware because you are free to move. You can go from Poona to Bombay and from Bombay to Delhi so you feel you are free. But just try to go from Calcutta to Dacca and there will be problems, or from Bombay to Karachi, and the problem. Suddenly you find that there is no respect for you, for your freedom, and petty officials start tyrannising you. They enjoy it – that is their power.”

—Osho

Gael Garcia Bernal On Mexico’s Plan to Save Its Image With Documentary Films

The 2017 Academy Awards ceremony was a largely apolitical affair, but Gael Garcia Bernal changed that. Co-presenting the Oscar for Best Animated Feature Film, he acknowledged the current tension with the Trump Administration over immigration issues, specifically as they pertained to Mexico. “As a Mexican, as a migrant worker, as a human being, I’m against any form of wall that separates us,” he said.

Over the last 12 years, Bernal has been putting that message of unification to work within the boundaries of his native country, pushing a country marred by reports of a drug war and other problems to find itself at the movies. Along with his close friend and “Y Tu Mama Tambien” co-star Diego Luna and the producer Elena Fortes, Bernal co-founded the Ambulante Documentary Film Festival in 2005. The traveling screening series focuses on non-fiction film that brings its vast programming to cities and rural areas around the country over the course of two months.

READ MORE: Mexico Detains, Then Frees, Undocumented Subjects of an Ambulante Documentary Ahead of Its World Premiere

Bolstered by generous government funding and the support of the national theater chain Cinépolis, Ambulante’s 2017 edition featured 106 documentaries screened across 64 days in 42 venues. The lineup is an eclectic blend of highlights from the international documentary scene — from “I Am Not Your Negro” to “Last Men in Aleppo” —to locally-produced projects and students films depicting everyday life in Mexico.

On opening weekend in Mexico City, screenings were packed less with industry figures than curious locals intrigued by the prospects of unfamiliar programming, starting with a free outdoor screening of “The Eagle Huntress” in the city’s plaza. That weekend, more than 300 moviegoers camped outside in the mountainous region known as Los Dinamos for a free screening of the documentary “Brimstone and Glory,” about the fireworks celebration in Tultepec, Mexico, and engaged in a prolonged Q&A session with the filmmaker that ran almost as long as the movie itself.

Such widespread enthusiasm is exactly what Bernal and Luna had in mind. “There’s an interesting dialogue that happens when people are in the same room watching a documentary,” Bernal said in an interview. “The singular discourse disappears. Arguments become more sophisticated. This is what happens when you see a plaza full of people watching a documentary for free.”

Bernal was inspired to start Ambulante after seeing that Eugenio Polgovsky’s 2004 documentary “Tropic of Cancer,” about an isolated community in Mexico in which villagers trap animals to sell them to tourists, failed to get a release in its home country. “It made me feel that there was no chance for someone to see the film — specifically, the people who are portrayed in it,” Bernal said. “Maybe a few film festivals could screen it, but that would be it. So we decided to take that film and others to the places where they were shot. It was more utopian euphoria than frustration.”

Notably, Ambulante receives 44% of its funding from U.S. sources, although some 40% comes from federal and state funds, while an additional 15% comes comes from private sponsors, and just one percent comes from ticketing and merchandise sales. Ambulante has been designed more as a form of advocacy than a business, and that goal has extended to its educational initiative, Ambulante Mas Alla.

The program involves filmmaking workshops in rural areas of Mexico, where participants ranging from teenagers to senior citizens produce short films about topics such as farming and family traditions. Since the program launched with the start of Ambulante, program instructor and documentary producer Carlos Rossini said that he has seen significant improvement in the sensibilities of his students. “It used to be that when I asked what was the last documentary students had seen, they would say ‘Shark Week,’” he said. “Now, after 12 years, that has changed. They talk about the films they saw at Ambulante.”

The communal progress underscores a broader goal for the festival, now run by director Paulina Suarez and director of programming Meghan Monsour: the capacity to push beyond stereotypical impressions of the country and its hardships. “This is the most important thing for us now,” Rossini said. “To discover that people are all on one side. It’s not what everybody says it is. It’s not a war, it’s not that everybody’s a corrupt police officer or politician. It’s a big country working through things, sharing thing. There are many difficulties, but most of us believe that this place has a future.”

For Bernal, the festival allows Mexico both a window into its own identity and the ability to scrutinize other cultures. “Watching otherness, understanding and creating empathy, can only lead to good things,” he said. “All films are political to me.”

The 2017 Ambulante Film Festival runs through May 25, 2017.

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Related stories Mark Boal and Annapurna Pictures Are Getting Into the Documentary BusinessHow Hot Docs, North America’s Smartest Festival, Could Anoint an Oscar WinnerIndieWire’s Movie Podcast: Screen Talk (Episode 147) - New Documentaries and Horror Movies You Should See
ID #69683

Name: Vanshajaa
Age: 18
Country: India

Hi I’m Vanshajaa ,but you can call me vanshu. I’m 18 and just graduated high school. I love reading. I can cook but don’t have the enthusiasm to. I’m a pro at procrastinating . I spend 95% of my time on the internet , rest of the time I either eat or sleep .

I would love to have a pen-pal from anywhere across the world . A friend who’s not within the boundaries of my country or maybe continent.
I can entertainment you with my poor humor and silly way of life.

Preferences: 16+ ,but if you’re homophobic , transphobic or racist that won’t do

indiewire.com
Gael Garcia Bernal On Mexico’s Plan to Save Its Image With Documentary Films
The Ambulante Documentary Film Festival, now in its 12th year, is helping the country grapple with its own identity.
By Eric Kohn

Over the last 12 years, Bernal has been putting that message of unification to work within the boundaries of his native country, pushing a country marred by reports of a drug war and other problems to find itself at the movies. Along with his close friend and “Y Tu Mama Tambien” co-star Diego Luna and the producer Elena Fortes, Bernal co-founded the Ambulante Documentary Film Festival in 2005. The traveling screening series focuses on non-fiction film that brings its vast programming to cities and rural areas around the country over the course of two months.

theguardian.com
End all immigration controls – they’re a sign we value money more than people | Gary Younge | Opinion | The Guardian

“Sadly, that is not a principle that underpins the system we live in. The rich can buy themselves citizenship in about 20 countries, cash down. Meanwhile, desperate people are turned away at borders all the time. Others are incarcerated for having the audacity to cross borders we have created, to escape wars we have started, environmental chaos we have contributed to, or poverty we have helped create. Others die trying.

It is a fact, rarely stated but generally acknowledged and accepted, that the global poor should not be allowed to travel. That’s most of the world. As such, from the refugee camp in Calais to the rickety vessels on the Mediterranean, from Trump’s wall to the Berlin wall, the border stands as an ultimate point of confrontation in the broader dystopia we have made possible.

Nation states are a relatively new concept; migration is as old as humanity. Borders seek to regulate and restrict that basic human custom for the distinct purpose of excluding some and privileging others. They discriminate between all people with the express intention of then being able to discriminate against some people. They do not simply set boundaries for countries, but are metaphors for the boundaries of how we might think about other human beings. Immigrants are not the problem. Borders are.”

Floriana Lima’s Maggie Sawyer (and the difference between ethnic and racial profiling)

The past weeks I’ve seen a lot of passionate posts about Floriana Lima’s casting choice as Maggie Sawyer in Supergirl. I tried to stay far away from the debate; however, every once in a while I would bump into a post and I’d notice a lot of confusion regarding the difference between racial and ethnic identity. I have read people refer to Maggie as a POC because of her implied “Latina” heritage or negate Floriana as a POC because of her Italian roots. Yet, both of these aspects are not mutually exclusive. So, I thought clarifying some of these concepts might be helpful.

*Small disclaimer* Racial identification in Latin America is often more ambiguous and fluid than in the United States, it’s often situational and has very blurry boundaries. For many countries it is a taboo not discussed, or a notion buried by saying that we are a “brown society” without racial discrimination. Explaining it properly, taking into account every country, would take a very long time and there are people far better equipped for it.

Now…keeping this simple. Skin colour is the primary characteristic that contributes to a person’s racial profile and their cultural heritage is the main ethnic identifier. Floriana Lima is racially non-white because she does not have white skin, identifiably a WOC. Ethnically, apparently she is of Italian descend or has family in Brasil, but was born in the US? (I lost track of the truth). On the other hand, Maggie Sawyer was first proposed as a Latina character and that’s her ethnicity. So if we wished for ethnical accuracy, she could have been played (hypothetically speaking)  by any of these actresses who are Latina, but racially white.

Originally posted by baestheorem

Originally posted by dcomgifs

Originally posted by mccartney-paul

Now, as a Latina women myself, I understand there is a necessity to add more Latina actresses into the mix. I do. 

With that said, typecasting makes it difficult for people to identify Latin American citizens who are white as Latinos, and consequently casting directors tend to attach roles based on the racial profile that they imagine an ethnicity to have… Pushing us deeper into a vicious cycle of misinterpretation. I’m also guessing that the decision to change Maggie Sawyer’s original look from the Comics was brought up by the necessity to sprinkle more diversity (a non-white character) into the cast. So the Supergirl casting directors would have been forced to add “Latina actresses, but please abstain if you look white” into the call sheet which doesn’t sound right. Like, talk about discriminatory much. Yikes.

I don’t mean to say that demands for diversity are invalid. I think it’s brilliant that we are having these conversations in the first place. But, in all honesty I believe it’s a social issue that would still exist with or without Floriana Lima playing Maggie Sawyer. Shows like One Day at a Time are a good opportunity to showcase different racial identities within a family that shares the same culture, and I believe that’s the way to do it. 

Originally posted by televisiongif

Yet, you have others shows like Modern Family with a leading Latina actress but a portrayal that racially plays further into stereotypes.

Originally posted by missmysteriousm

As for Floriana’s Maggie Sawyer: I believe that the character demanded not only for a non-white actress, but also someone who could convincingly portray a badass detective with underlying vulnerability, comfortable with their sexuality and a profound love for Alex Danvers ❤. On those later accounts I believe Floriana had the professional experience to do the role justice, and she has. 

It will never cease to amaze me how someone raised in one culture, in one country, speaking one language can connect with someone who was raised in a different culture, a different country, with a different first language. I love how when you remove the political, religious, economic, and societal boundaries two people can be so innately similar. So similar that while embracing their differences, they can easily forget that these differences are viewed as bad and toxic by other people and simply enjoy the others company. It will never cease to amaze me how little people care about social norms.
—  KJS // Excerpt from a book I’ll never write #44

Legendary snow leopards are rarely seen in the wild, as they live high in the mountains of Central Asia. Although the cats freely cross the international boundaries of 12 countries, their secretive behavior and remote habitat among the highest mountains in the world add to their mystery. Because of their shy behavior and uncanny, almost mystical ability to disappear among the rocks, snow leopards have entered the folklore of local peoples in many countries and have been described as shape-changing mountain spirits.