botanical herb plant

10

A curious herbal containing five hundred cuts, of the most useful plants, which are now used in the practice of physick engraved on folio copper plates, 

By Blackwell, Elizabeth,
John Nourse.
Samuel Harding.
Publication info
London : Printed for Samuel Harding, 1737-1739.
BHL Collections:
Blog Features
Missouri Botanical Garden’s Materia Medica
Missouri Botanical Garden’s Rare Books Collections

✨Skin Woes, Begone!✨

🌿ahh, the versatility of nature; that warm golden color comes from the helichrysum🌿

also included:
- lavender
- tea tree
- oats

((to be used topically, as a toner- I’m using it on my face to treat redness & inflammation and on bae’s very minor wounds he got from tripping on asphalt to help them heal faster))

☀️ happy Saturday ☀️

🍄Witch Jars & Botanicals 🍄

Mormon Tea

Going with the botanical theme here for plants in the Mojave I present my second favorite, Mormon Tea. Ephedra Viridis is the latin name for it. It grows everywhere in the Mojave.

It’s a woody plant that has green segmented stems that grow like reeds do and then dry out and turn hard and woody and from that other stems grow. They generally get to be about six feet high at the tallest and a few feet around. 

The green shoots can be cut off and broken up then brewed into a nice tea that has a semi sweet flavor and taste herbal. If you like Herbal tea you’ll love this. The natural Ephedra in it acts a stimulant and that is how it got it’s name. When the Mormon settlers started coming into the Mojave they traded with the Paiutes and the Paiutes introduced them to this plant. By making tea with it the Mormons were able to work harder and longer and tons of it was harvested and sent north to Salt Lake City and distributed to the Mormons in the 1800′s. 

In the spring it flowers with pretty little yellow cluster flowers that are pollinated and produce tiny seeds that birds sometimes eat and distribute. 

I’ve drank a lot of this stuff over the years with no ill health effects. I’m sure there is a limit to how much you should consume every day but I haven’t hit it and I’ve had sometimes over a gallon of it a day. It makes great iced tea. 

Lemon

(Citrus limon) Safe to interact with.

Folk Name: Ulamula.
Gender: Feminine.
Planet: Moon.
Element: Water.
Powers: Longevity, Purification, Love, Friendship.

Magical Uses: Lemon juice is mixed with water and the resultant mixture is used to wash amulets, jewelry and other magical objects which have been obtained secondhand.
This wash ensures that all negative vibrations are cleansed from the object in question. The juice is also added to bath water at the time of the full Moon for its purificatory powers.
The dried flowers and peel are added to love sachets and mixtures, and the leaves are used in lust teas. A lemon tree grown from a seed which was taken from a lemon that you have consumed is a highly appropriate gift to a loved one, although admittedly this is a long process. Lemon pie, served to a spouse, will help strengthen fidelity, and a slice of fresh lemon placed beneath a visitor’s chair ensures that your friendship will last.
Obtain a green (unripe) lemon from a tree. It should be no larger than VA inches in diameter. Next, obtain some color-headed pins. Every color except black is fine; if any black-headed pins are present remove them. Now stick the pins, one at a time, into the lemon, until it is fairly bristling with them. Attach a piece of yarn or ribbon to the lemon and hang up in the home to bring blessings and luck, or give to a friend. These “lemon and pins” charms are easy to make and are quite effective, too. A lemon may serve as a poppet.

(from Cunningham’s Encyclopedia of Magical Herbs by Scott Cunningham)

Become a Biodynamic Gardener, and grow your own. Learn about “the buddy system” and “companion plantings” as well as composting and crop rotation. Certain plants benefit by growing near other plants: tall crops can provide a canopy for shorter crops; leeks will repel carrot flies; include flowering herbs and perennials to attract beneficial insects. 

Illustration:  Genevieve Simms 

Mugwort

(Artemisia vulgaris) Do not take if pregnant.

Folk Names: Artemis Herb, Artemisia, Felon Herb, Muggons, Naughty Man, Old Man, Old Uncle Henry, Sailor’s Tobacco, St. John’s Plant.
Gender: Feminine.
Planet: Venus.
Element: Earth.
Deities: Artemis, Diana.
Powers: Strength, Psychic Powers, Protection, Prophetic Dreams, Healing, Astral Projection.

Magical Uses: Place mugwort in the shoes to gain strength during long walks or runs. For this purpose pick mugwort before sunrise, saying:

Tollam te artemesia, ne lassus sim in via.

A pillow stuffed with mugwort and slept upon will produce prophetic dreams. Mugwort is also burned with sandalwood or wormwood during scrying rituals, and a mugwort infusion is drunk (sweetened with honey) before divination.
The infusion is also used to wash crystal balls and magic mirrors, and mugwort leaves are placed around the base of the ball (or beneath it) to aid in psychic workings.
When carrying mugwort you cannot be harmed by poison, wild beasts, or sunstroke, according to ancient tradition. In a building, mugwort prevents elves and “evil thynges” from entering, and bunches of mugwort are used in Japan by the Ainus to exorcise spirits of disease who are thought to hate the odor. In China, it is hung over doors to keep evil spirits from buildings.
Mugwort is also carried to increase lust and fertility, to prevent backache, and to cure disease and madness. Placed next to the bed, it aids in achieving astral projection.

(from Cunningham’s Encyclopedia of Magical Herbs by Scott Cunningham)

Mint

(Mentha spp.) For specific cautions, look up specific mint.

Folk Name: Garden Mint.
Gender: Masculine.
Planet: Mercury.
Element: Air.
Deities: Pluto, Hecate.
Powers: Money, Lust, Healing, Travel, Exorcism, Protection.

Magical Uses: Mint has long been used in healing potions and mixtures, and the fresh leaves rubbed against the head are said to relieve headaches. Mint worn at the wrist assures that you will not be ill. Stomach problems can be alleviated by stuffing a green poppet with mint and anointing it with healing oils.
Mint is also used in travel spells and to provoke lust. Its bright green leaves and crisp scent led to its use in money and prosperity spells; the easiest of which is to place a few leaves in the wallet or purse, or to rub where your money is kept.
To rid a place of evil, sprinkle salt water with a sprinkler made of fresh sprigs of mint, marjoram and rosemary. Fresh mint laid on the altar will call good spirits to be present and aid you in magic. Mint is also kept in the home for protection.

“Mint” is a general term for any of the Mentha family.

(from Cunningham’s Encyclopedia of Magical Herbs by Scott Cunningham)

Marigold

(Calendula officinalis) Safe to interact with.

Folk Names: Bride of the Sun, Calendula, Drunkard, Goldes, Holigolde, Husbandman’s Dial, Marybud, Marygold, Mary Gowles, Ruddes, Ruddles, Spousa Solis, Summer’s Bride.
Gender: Masculine.
Planet: Sun.
Element: Fire.
Powers: Protection, Prophetic Dreams, Legal Matters, Psychic Powers.

Magical Uses: Marigolds, picked at noon when the Sun is at its hottest and strongest, will strengthen and comfort the heart.
Garlands of marigolds strung on the doorposts stop evil from entering the house, and scattered under the bed they protect you while asleep and make your dreams come true, i.e., give you prophetic dreams. Especially effective in discovering a thief who has robbed you.
Marigolds added to the bath water help win the respect and admiration of everyone you meet.
Looking at the bright flowers strengthens the sight, and carried in the pocket, marigold helps justice to smile favorably upon you while in court.
If a girl touches the petals of the marigold with her bare feet, she will understand the languages of the birds.

(from Cunningham’s Encyclopedia of Magical Herbs by Scott Cunningham)