borophaginae

Genus: Epicyon

(meaning “more than a dog”)

….a extinct genus of bone-crushing dogs that lived in North America during the middle Miocene to late Miocene. Like other bone-crushing dogs members of this genus had large teeth and jaws which were used to crush bones, as suggested in their common name. Members of Epicyon were a lot larger than other borophagines with some species  weighing over 370 pounds and were around the size of a bear. Epicyon was one of the last of the borophagines and shared its habitat with numerous other canids like Canis lepophagus, the first wolf.

Phylogeny

Animalia-Chordata-Mammalia-Carnivora-Canidae-Borophaginae-Epicyon

Image: Doug Shore

phys.org
Fossil dog represents a new species, paleontology grad student finds
A doctoral student at the University of Pennsylvania has identified a new species of fossil dog. The specimen, found in Maryland, would have roamed the coast of eastern North America approximately 12 million years ago, at a time when massive sharks like megalodon swam in the oceans.

The newly named species is Cynarctus wangi, named for Xiaoming Wang, curator at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County and a renowned expert on mammalian carnivores. This coyote-sized dog was a member of the extinct subfamily Borophaginae, commonly known as bone-crushing dogs because of their powerful jaws and broad teeth…

BONE CRUSHING DOGS

Photo catalog: 

  1. Assorted brains at The Field Museum: Order Carnivora. Family Canidae. Subfamily Borophaginae. 
  2. The subfamily Borophaginae is an extinct group of canids called “bone-crushing dogs” that were endemic to North America during the Oligocene to Pliocene and lived roughly 36—2.5 million years ago and existing for about 33.5 million years.