born to film

What really sucks about the way Joss Whedon writes is that he sort of has this idea that if he writes about women being strong and confident, that is all it takes for women to appreciate his work. Like, even if the villain constantly belittles a woman for being a woman and people are constantly harassing her and sexualizing her, it’s okay because she’s strong and she can take it.

The biggest difference between Whedon’s version of Wonder Woman and Jenkins is that in Whedon’s version Wonder Woman is A Woman. She (and the audience) must be constantly aware that she is a Woman, that she is Sexy, that she is overcoming incredible odds because she has the terrible disadvantage of Being Born A Woman.

Whereas in Jenkins’ film Diana simply exists. There are some points made by other characters about her being a woman, like when Steve won’t sleep with her because he feels it’s improper, or when his secretary says, “Oh yes, put specs on her, like after that she won’t be the most beautiful woman you’ve ever seen”, but Diana is almost completely unaware of her status as a Dreaded Woman. Her excitement over a baby? She’s literally never seen one before. Her little makeover seen? Spends the whole thing looking for something comfortable she can fight in. She basically never mentions the difference between men and women, never even says that women are better or whatever because she was raised by them. 

Joss Whedon would have never let Wonder Woman forget she was a Woman. She would have constantly been making comments about it, wether positive or negative, as would everyone around her. In Whedon’s heyday that might have flown a lot better, but now women seem to be a little sick of grrrrl power. They just want power. They just want to exist, both on screen and in life, without constant reminders that they are Women and that they must pay for that at every turn.

9

Female Characters Appreciation, Villains: Part 1

“Isn’t it time to acknowledge the ugly side? I’ve grown quite weary of the spunky heroines, brave rape victims, soul-searching fashionistas that stock so many books. I particularly mourn the lack of female villains — good, potent female villains. Not ill-tempered women who scheme about landing good men and better shoes (as if we had nothing more interesting to war over), not chilly WASP mothers (emotionally distant isn’t necessarily evil), not soapy vixens (merely bitchy doesn’t qualify either). I’m talking violent, wicked women. Scary women. Don’t tell me you don’t know some. The point is, women have spent so many years girl-powering ourselves — to the point of almost parodic encouragement — we’ve left no room to acknowledge our dark side. Dark sides are important. They should be nurtured like nasty black orchids.”

film rec list

modern vampire films let the right one in, thirst, only lovers left alive, a girl walks home alone at night

woman descending into madness persona, through a glass darkly, a woman under the influence, rosemary’s baby, antichrist, repulsion, queen of earth

two lovers on the run wild at heart, badlands, gun crazy, pierrot le fou, bonnie and clyde, true romance, natural born killers

same-sex love stories happy together, show me love, water lilies, the handmaiden, brokeback mountain, my beautiful launderette

really weird romcoms i’m a cyborg but that’s ok, the lobster, lars and the real girl, harold and maude

ready to cry? the hunt, dancer in the dark, requiem for a dream, mulholland drive, au hazard balthazar

best ensemble cast movies inglourious basterds, apocalypse now, beetlejuice, magnolia, the royal tenenbaums, eastern promises

old black and white movies that definitely still hold up and you should watch them the night of the hunter, psycho, dr. strangelove, a streetcar named desire, the third man, bunny lake is missing

youth culture films a clockwork orange, sid and nancy, jubilee, gummo, stranger than paradise, if…, the doom generation

10

“If your dream only includes you, it’s too small.”

On her birthday, here is the infallible, authentic, and pioneering Queen Ava DuVernay collaborating on her many sets.

“Let Ava DuVernay tell the stories she wants to tell in the way she wants to tell them. If one of these stories just so happens to center around a man in spandex, then DuVernay has already exhibited the necessary skill and strength to make this movie, free of studio mandates, legacy liabilities, and fanboy entitlements. At this point, I’d watch her direct a drivers ed tutorial. Like the great cinematic genre-hoppers who came before her, DuVernay’s directorial print contains multitudes, and the future of cinema suddenly seems a hell of a lot brighter knowing that her inimitably unpredictable vision is a part of it.” — Matthew Eng

(Source: TribecaFilm.com)

4

“…what Streisand accomplishes in Funny Girl is at once a redefinition of what a musical star can look like as well as a reconfirmation of what so many of us return to the movies to find: pristine encapsulations of talent in motion. Such talent, as exemplified in Streisand’s performance and throughout her peerless career, is indeed, as Kael declared, its own form of beauty. But with the lights low and the screen bright, it can also be its own elusive form of magic, as pure and pleasurable as any ever captured on film.”

On her 75th birthday, here’s how the singular and supreme Barbra Streisand broke out her own way with an unconventional movie star presence in Funny Girl, by Matthew Eng

Cheryl Dunye (b. 1966) is an academic and filmmaker, whose work focuses on issues of sexuality and race, particularly those surrounding the lives of black lesbians. She currently teaches at San Francisco State University.

Her 1996 film, The Watermelon Woman, has made history by being the first full-length feature film directed and written by a black lesbian about the subject. Another film, Stranger Inside, focuses on the experiences of African-American lesbians in prison. She has won numerous awards for her work, particularly in recognition of their promotion of LGBT themes.