born for combat

May 5, 1917 - French 21st Division Mutinies, Unrest Spreading in the French Army

Pictured - Fed up.

The French army suffered grievously during the Nivelle Offensive. Despite promises of swift victory, the French incurred over 40,000 casualties when well-prepared German defenses blunted their assault. One Senegalese battalion was wiped out to a man.

The French army had borne the brunt of combat on the Western Front, and its famous élan was beginning to run dry. Soldiers were fed up with their lot: bloody attacks for mere meters of ground, miserable trenches, a huge divide in conditions for the officer corps and la troupe. In early May entire divisions started to revolt.

On May 3 the 2nd Colonial Division simply refused to return to the front. Soldiers threw down their packs and told their officers to shove off. “Down with the war!” On May 5 the 21st Division did the same thing. Eventually, a handful of well-liked officers in both cases appealed to duty and convinced the soldiers to take their place in the line. But the mutineers had won their point: they refused to make any more doomed attacks. For now the line could hold, but mutiny was spreading, and the situation was beginning to look uncomfortably close to the one in Russia.

MBTI Types as Archetypes of Fantasy

ENFJ: The Mythic Warrior- This is no ordinary warrior. The archetypal hero of myth is born with extraordinary gifts and is destined to overcome the greatest evils of their day.

ISTP: The Hunter- Tough, willful, and wild, the Hunter abides by their inner compass, regardless of the conventions others try to push upon them.

ESTJ: The Barbarian- The Barbarian comes from wild, untamed lands and is tough, warlike, and brave. They hold firm ideals of honor and tradition.

ENTJ: The Knight- The Knight is a master combatant, born leader, and trusted guardian whose devotion sustains them on seemingly hopeless quests.

ENTP: The Trickster- The Trickster is a chaotic catalyst of change whose power stems from craftiness, adaptability and constant defiance. 

INTP: The Wise Wizard- The Wise Wizard is a brilliant conjurer and source of sage counsel for those in need. A chief authority for the less informed.

ESFP: The War Bringer- Recklessly brave and impulsive, the War Bringer’s violent tendencies are both the source of their power and their biggest weakness.

INFJ: The Shadow- The Shadow offers balance and insight in desperate situations. They are withdrawn, mysterious, and often misunderstood.

INTJ: The Anti Hero- Self-centered or misanthropic, the last thing the Anti-Hero wants is to be the hero, but they are often dragged into the story as a tactful ally.

ESTP: The Rogue- The Rogue believes rules are meant to be broken. They’re an outlaw with talents for deception, trickery, and swashbuckling adventure.

ESFJ: The Unlikely Hero- Despite humble origins, the Unlikely Hero’s courage, good fortune, and eagerness triumph in desperate circumstances.

ISTJ: The Iron Leader- The Iron Leader maintains a position of high authority. A brave guardian of their people, they are steady and disciplined, even in times of crisis.

ISFJ: The Companion- The Companion is loyal and practical, offering an optimistic point of view, even in the darkest of times.

ENFP: The Fool- The Fool enjoys a unique perspective that allows them to see what others overlook. Their perpetual lightheartedness seemingly dissolves dangerous situations.

INFP: The Mystic- The Mystic’s abilities make them a valuable ally, but their solitary, introverted, and seemingly erratic nature often leads them to be judged unfairly.

ISFP: The Hero’s Muse- The Hero’s Muse is kind, patient, and inspiring. They are connected to the concept of Paradise, and this quality makes them more powerful then they appear.

Tagged by @solar-born


combat !
repost, don’t reblog !

Saulé Usyk

★★★★★ — strength

★★★★☆ — offense

★★★★☆ — defense

★★☆☆☆ — speed

★★★★☆ — durability

★☆☆☆☆ — accuracy

★★☆☆☆ — agility

★★★★★ — stamina

★★★★☆ — teamwork 

★☆☆☆☆ — stealth  

★★★★☆ — close combat

★★★☆☆ — bladed weapons ( swords, dagger/s )

★☆☆☆☆ — blunt weapons ( club/s, staff/s )   

★★★☆☆ — ranged weapons ( archery, gun/s ) 

★★★★☆ — medic 

★★★★★ — superpowers / abilities 

★☆☆☆☆ — traps/setups

Any lasting injuries from combat?  — None

Fighting style? (bold any that apply)  —
commander / duelist / honorable / dishonorable / would have others do their fighting / stealthy / long-ranged / short-ranged / mid-ranged / melee / technological / sorcery / superhuman abilities / has fought in a tournament / a lover of fighting / a hater of fighting / cowardly / reckless / strategic / uses underhand tricks / renowned for their skill / trained / untrained / keeps skill secret / won a battle / lost a battle / ruthless / merciful

***

Ethel Rinn

★★☆☆☆ — strength

★★★★☆ — offense

★★☆☆☆ — defense

★★★★☆ — speed

★★☆☆☆ — durability

★★★★★ — accuracy

★★★★★ — agility

★★★☆☆ — stamina

★★★★★ — teamwork 

★★★★☆ — stealth  

★★★☆☆ — close combat

★★★★★ — bladed weapons ( swords, dagger/s )

★☆☆☆☆ — blunt weapons ( club/s, staff/s )   

★★★★☆ — ranged weapons ( archery, gun/s ) 

★★★☆☆ — medic 

★★★★★ — superpowers / abilities 

★★★☆☆ — traps/setups

Any lasting injuries from combat?  — None

Fighting style? (bold any that apply)  —
commander / duelist / honorable / dishonorable / would have others do their fighting / stealthy / long-ranged / short-ranged / mid-ranged / melee / technological / sorcery / superhuman abilities / has fought in a tournament / a lover of fighting / a hater of fighting / cowardly / reckless / strategic / uses underhand tricks / renowned for their skill / trained / untrained / keeps skill secret / won a battle / lost a battle / ruthless / merciful

***

Giacomo Taldegardo

★★★★☆ — strength

★★☆☆☆ — offense

★★★☆☆ — defense

★★★★☆ — speed

★★★☆☆ — durability

★★★★★ — accuracy

★★★☆☆ — agility

★★★☆☆ — stamina

★★★★★ — teamwork 

★☆☆☆☆ — stealth  

★★★☆☆ — close combat

★★★★★ — bladed weapons ( swords, dagger/s )

★☆☆☆☆ — blunt weapons ( club/s, staff/s )   

★★★☆☆— ranged weapons ( archery, gun/s ) 

★★★★☆ — medic 

★★★★☆ — superpowers / abilities 

★☆☆☆☆— traps/setups

Any lasting injuries from combat?  — None / Lost completely the Light after the City’s attack (Destiny 2 Timeline)

Fighting style? (bold any that apply)  —
commander / duelist / honorable / dishonorable / would have others do their fighting / stealthy / long-ranged / short-ranged / mid-ranged / melee / technological / sorcery / superhuman abilities / has fought in a tournament / a lover of fighting / a hater of fighting / cowardly / reckless / strategic / uses underhand tricks / renowned for their skill / trained / untrained / keeps skill secret / won a battle / lost a battle / ruthless / merciful


Tagging: who wants to do this x)

3

Life and Death in the Korengal.

Baker Company, 2nd Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division in the Korengal Valley, Kunar Province, Afghanistan, August 2009.

(Photos and article by Sergeant Matthew Moeller, 22 AUG 2009.)

KUNAR PROVINCE, Afghanistan — As bullets started to rain down on Baker Company’s position, a Soldier sighed, and said, annoyingly, “Well here we go.”

Over the next twenty minutes the service members fired everything from bullets to curse words at the invisible enemy attacking from the surrounding hills.

“Just once I’d like to come out here and not get shot at,” said an exasperated U.S. Army Sgt. Graham Mullins, of Columbia, Mo., using a four-foot stone wall for cover. “Just once.”

Near the end, two F-15 fighter jets pummeled the insurgent forces with 500-pound bombs, and an eerie silence fell across the battlefield. For the U.S. service members, it was just another morning in the notorious Korengal Valley. 

Nicknamed “The Valley of Death,” the 2nd Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division, Soldiers have called the isolated valley, in Afghanistan’s Kunar province, home, since arriving in June.

“This place is definitely its own monster; there are a lot of other dangerous places in Afghanistan, but I would say this place lives up to the hype,” said U.S. Army Capt. Mark Moretti, Co. B. commander, and New Windsor, N.Y., native.

“It’s all just a waiting game,” said a Co. B Soldier, during a ‘routine’ patrol. “We come out here, and wait for them to open fire on us.”

Seeing some of the toughest fighting in Afghanistan on a daily basis, many Baker Co. Soldiers find humor in the idea that many of their fellow Soldiers are envious of their assignment, who often refer to the almost constant battle as the 'infantryman’s dream.’

“I would tell them to seriously reconsider their thinking positions,” U.S. Army Spc. Guadalupe Gardenias, a B Co. Soldier, said, laughing.

Living in conditions that rival the third-world villages they patrol, the tiny U.S outposts dotting the valley walls are in stark contrast to other American mega-bases in Afghanistan, such as Bagram Airfield, which offers everything from personal internet to American fast food restaurants. 

Here, if a resupply helicopter gets cancelled, Soldiers miss not only letters from home, but risk having to ration their food.

At the Korengal Outpost, Soldiers use outhouses and hope to shower once a week to conserve water. At nearby Restrepo Outpost, Soldiers lack any running water, and eat field rations for every meal.

“The conditions out here are tough, and it’s a tough fight,” said Moretti. “But given the chance, I don’t think anyone would want to leave.”

Despite daily gun battles, poor hygiene and tortuous terrain, the men of Baker Co. seem content living their life in the “Valley of Death.” When asked if they would take an easier assignment, the answer was always the same. “Not unless everyone else came with me." 

To these Soldiers the debate back home about the war in Afghanistan means little. To them, it’s the brotherhood, born in combat, keeping these Soldiers motivated to stand shoulder to shoulder.

"Before I came into the Army a lot of people would talk about brothers in arms, and I thought it was kind of cheesy, but being out here, I can definitely say that it brings us a lot closer,” said Gardanias. “Cause no matter what we say, or what we do, nobody besides us is going to know what we went through, and what it was like.”

anonymous asked:

Hello! I have a bit of an... odd question. But ths something that has been bothering me greatly. Most of the time I have seen people tell someone that (both in media and real life) "they weren't born for combat". Do you think anyone can become a fighter? Or do you need some "talent"?

No, there’s no such thing. Whether they want to admit it or not, every single person has the capacity for violence.

There are some people are so phenomenally talented like Ernie Reyes Jr., Jet Li, Jackie Chan, Sammo Hung, to name a few, that their skill leaves you breathless with envy. However, the same can be said for any person who is extraordinarily talented like Gabbie Douglass, Shawn Johnson, Nastia Liukin, or any Olympic level athlete. You hear phrases like “they were born for it” tossed around for them, because predestination is an easy way to explain why some people are just more talented than others.

However, by linking their success only to fate does them a disservice. It cuts out the second and perhaps most important aspect of what lead to their success. Hard work.

Being the best is a combination of multiple factors: skill, luck, love, determination, and perseverance.

You can get skill without talent, because what you need to become skilled is a willingness to apply yourself and work hard. You could be the most talented person ever to throw a punch or land a kick in Taekwondo, but if you don’t love it or want to do it then you won’t succeed. You’ll quit.

Martial arts schools have an incredibly high turnover rate because a lot of people do give up. From adults to children (especially children), the vast majority of those who sign up will be gone within the first three months. When I tested for my first black belt, though it was in a group of six or seven candidates, none of them were from the original group I’d started out with. Second and third, however, was with most of the same people at my school from my second test.

Why? Because by that point we’d built a camaraderie, and though we ran the age gamut from fourteen to fifty, we were a team. The ones who stick with it are the ones who stay. It’s not talent, it’s perseverance, and the willingness to put in the extra time.

“Born for it” is just an excuse. It’s easy to comprehend, it’s bite size, easy to swallow, and you don’t have to think about it much beyond that. The failure is outside,  whatever happened this person was always going to fail. It’s not a black mark against them, it’s just fate. Risk free and guilt free. “It’s okay, you weren’t meant for it”.

For me, it’s right up there with “women can’t fight”. You’ve heard it, “nature didn’t build them that way”. “It’s not your place”. People repeat it, even when we have a slews and slews of evidence in any martial arts school around the country that it isn’t true.

“You’ll never be good enough, so why even try?”

Because trying is the only way you will ever be any good. This is true of anything, you have to be willing to stick with it and keep going even when it’s not easy. Keep pushing when it’s hard, volunteer to put in the extra time, do what you don’t have to do.

In my martial arts school (and most schools do this), we had early practice on Saturday mornings at 7am-8:30am at one of the local high schools. We’d work out, run the mile, focus entirely on our conditioning. It was hard. Hard to wake up that early on a weekend, hard to sacrifice the first few hours of the Saturday Morning Cartoon Block, hard to show up rain or shine. It became mandatory at red belt, but the instructors suggested starting as early as blue belt, or even earlier.

The ones who put in the extra time earlier than it was required were the ones most likely to make it to the test. One of the reasons is that training for black belt not only has a conditioning/endurance test, but also a commitment test. Training for black belt takes time, the serious training starts six months in advance (though it really starts earlier than that), and training upgrades from three times a week to five with special and extra practices tacked on to what you’re already doing. Our Saturday Morning practices were taken over by the main organizations and required going down to Willow Glen to train with Master Ernie every Saturday. That required getting up at five in the morning for the hour long commute and getting home at ten. We picked up extra optional Sunday Beach Training for black belt candidates.

That’s just one example.

The most difficult part of training to fight (or any sport) is the time commitment. Training for first degree black belt was 10-15 hours a week (including travel time) on top of the 45 already covered by school. It was often late in the evenings, which meant I had to go to bed early. It left time for little else.

What do I think? I think talent is nice, but not relevant. Determination is, the will to show up even when you don’t want to (and there will be days when you don’t) is, putting in extra time and extra classes when you don’t have to be there is, volunteering around the school and helping your fellow classmates is.

You have to want to be good. You have to be willing to work to get better. Many more talented people will quit. If you work hard, you can go from being worst in the class to best in the class in a year.

You don’t need talent, you need will and to believe that you will improve. Both are much harder to come by.

Still, skills for surviving life.

-Michi

6

British heavy tanks were a series of related vehicles developed by the British Army during the First World War. The Mark I was the world’s first tank to enter combat. Born of the need to break the domination of trenches, barbed wire and machine guns over the battlefields of the Western Front, it was the first vehicle to be named “tank”, a name chosen as an expedient to maintain secrecy and to disguise its true purpose. It was developed to be able to cross trenches, resist small-arms fire, travel over difficult terrain, carry supplies, and to capture fortified enemy positions. It is regarded as successful in many respects, but suffered from many problems owing to its primitive nature.

requested by somehistoriancalledmike