borders gardens

Ideas for the Use of Thorns/Prickles

- Use them as components in spell jars or charm satchels for protection and prosperity.

- Hang a blackberry bramble over a door way (or multiple) in your house to prevent all manners of afflictions*

- Use in banishing spells to prevent the return of the person or entity you’re banishing

- Use rose thorns in your counter love spells, or your banishing spells for past lovers

- Enchant with protection/peace/prosperity/growth charms and bury them at the borders of your garden or property

- Incorporate thorns in your workings against liars, gossipers, or disguises. 

*This is a modified form of old English lore that states that passing under a bramble archway will accomplish these results. 


Feel free to add your own! After all, each path is different :)

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Plant of the Day
Thursday 4 August 2016

Achillea ‘Walther Funcke’ (yarrow) is a compact herbaceous perennial with divided, grey-green foliage, and short stems bearing flat sprays of deep orange flowers which fade to cream. This plant thrives in an open sunny position in a moist but well-drained soil and will not tolerate heavy, wet clay in winter.

Jill Raggett

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Plant of the Day

Friday 15 July 2016

The amazing cone-like, purplish flower-heads of Eryngium alpinum (alpine eryngo) are surrounded by vivid blue, spiny bracts, borne on blue stems. This erect herbaceous perennial grows up to 90cm, with heart-shaped, glossy dark green basal leaves. It needs a fairly dry, well-drained soil that is moderately fertile with a position in the full sun and protection from winter wet soil.

Jill Raggett

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Plant of the Day

Saturday 18 June 2016

Though a gateway at Sissinghurst Garden, Kent, can be seen the deep-rose and bronze flowers of Iris ‘Three Oaks’. This cultivar was registered in 1943 and, as with other bearded irises, was derived from Iris germanica. Vita Sackville-West the creator of the garden with her husband, Harold Nicolson, planted irises in association with shrub roses for a romantic early summer display.

Jill Raggett