border-security

Trump’s tweets attacking the judiciary go well beyond conventional criticism of judicial opinions on the substance or of “unelected judges” who are said to be overstepping their power. The description of the judge who first blocked his ban as a “so-called judge” directly targeted the judiciary’s institutional legitimacy. And it’s not hard to imagine where Trump’s explicit claim that any terrorist attack should be blamed on the judiciary will take him next, if such an attack does occur.
 
 
Trump recently claimed that “any negative polls are fake news,” particularly those from major networks like CNN, NBC and ABC. He added: “Sorry, people want border security and extreme vetting.” In other words, any poll that finds that Trump or his policies are unpopular is suspect or invented by definition. Multiple polls have shown that majorities reject his travel ban and his border wall, and global protests have broken out against the ban in particular. In other words, the public backlash to the first two major efforts to translate Trumpism into policy reality has been severe. In response, Trump is explicitly telling his supporters that any empirical evidence of that backlash must be discounted as fake news — particularly if the polls in question come from major news organizations, who are thus being cast as deliberate deceivers of Real Americans.
 
 

You cannot divorce that last point from the larger context here: Trump and Sean Spicer spent days attacking the news media for accurately reporting on his shriveled inauguration crowds, and Stephen Bannon has claimed that Trump’s “populist nation-state policies are supported by the vast and overwhelming majority of Americans” — in other words, that a vast silent majority is rooting for Trumpism to succeed. But that’s just nonsense. The effort to falsely inflate impressions of popular support for Trump — and for policies that in reality are deeply controversial and divisive and are being rejected by majorities — is concerted and deliberate. And the unabashed use of obvious and demonstrable lies to carry out this deception campaign is remarkably brazen.
 
 

Trump is now claiming that the media is covering up terrorist attacks, saying that “ISIS is on a campaign of genocide, committing atrocities across the world,” and that “in many cases, the very, very dishonest press doesn’t want to report it.” The larger context here is crucial, too: The media has in fact been invaluable in rooting out the dangerously incompetent process that led to the creation of this ban, as well as the ugly, discriminatory ideological underpinnings of the idea. In response, Trump, once again, is moving to obliterate the very possibility of shared agreement on the legitimate institutional role of the news media in informing the citizenry — right when it is playing that role to great effect by shedding light on the truth about his latest and most visible exercise of executive power, thus demonstrating that it can function as a check on him.

— 

Trump is now attacking all the institutions that could limit his power.

This is not what a president in a democracy (or, pedants, representative republic) does. This is what an autocrat who hopes to be a dictator does.

Congress is doing fuckall to stop this madman and his puppet master, Steve Bannon. We have to keep calling, keep marching, and when we have a chance, defeat these cowards in the next election. This means we start working now, and we don’t stop until they are gone. We will lose more battles than we win, but the ones we win will be fundamental to protecting our country.

The border is many things to different people across America. For some, it is a place of opportunity, where goods flow in and out of the country, adding to the economies of both Mexico and the United States. Others see it as a gateway for drugs and illegal immigration.

We wanted to know how the people who live and work on the border feel.

So we are travelling this week to Texas’s Rio Grande Valley.

This part of the border has been getting a lot of attention from politicians in Washington lately.  It’s one of the most active places now for apprehensions of illegal immigrants and drug traffickers. But it is also an economic pump for Southern Texas, because of its role as a huge shopping destination for Mexicans hitting the malls of McAllen.

The Rio Grande Valley in Texas abuts 320 miles of river, the iconic Rio Grande, which acts as the natural barrier and the de-facto border between Mexico and the United States. But in many parts of the area there is no man-made barrier between the two countries. In one tiny community, a hand cranked ferry takes people and cars across to the other side. It’s a sign of how intertwined the communities on both sides of the river are.

A decade ago, there were plans to build a border fence here but they never came to fruition because of lack of money, among other reasons. Today, President Donald Trump has promised to build a wall across the entire Southern border and this part of Texas may be included in that.  

Join us—Lulu Garcia-Navarro, host of Weekend Edition, and producers Ravenna Koenig and Samantha Balaban– as we explore this area over the next four days.

(Photo: NPR/ Ravenna Koenig)

Free Agency - an NHL!Bitty interlude

Jack is contemplating a move now that his contract with the Falconers is up. He and Eric weigh the options.

NHL!Bitty Masterpost




They’re spread out in the theater room, Eric on his second glass of wine, Jack on his third beer, staring down a whiteboard covered corner to corner in haphazard scrawl and laminated NHL team logos.

“The Kings are rebuilding next year.” Eric offers. “Good opportunity to start fresh. The endorsement market in Los Angeles is lucrative, and the team has more than enough cap space to match Carolina’s offer. Bonus: closer to yours truly.” Eric pauses. “Also Parson.”

“Kent won’t stay in Vegas.”

“You sure about that?”

“The Avalanche are gunning for him, and the legal weed is a draw. It seems to be helping Jeff’s back injury.”

“Kent’s not going opt for Denver just because Troy loves pot.” Eric sighs. “So, back to LA.”

“What’s the downside?” Jack counters.

“Downside: it’s Los Angeles. The Rams are hogging a lot of the sports coverage.”

“But the Kings are a great team. Consistent post-season appearances, good management, warm, sunny weather.” Jack takes a swig of his beer to emphasize his point, waggling his eyebrows at Eric while he pokes the Kings logo on the board with his toe, scooting it down.

“Next: Vancouver.”

“Hard pass.”

“No love for the Canucks?”

“Nope.”

“Edmonton and Calgary are capped but want to be considered down the line…Winnipeg and Minnesota showed some interest, but you might be fighting for attention if they draft high this year.”

“You’re ignoring the six.”

“I’m not, just building up to it.”

“Blackhawks are out because they didn’t float an offer. Boo, Blackhawks. Bruins would be uncomfortable because of the rivalry, Penguins are waiting on you, which I’m not fond of…and the Canadiens just don’t have the cap space. Unless someone retires you’d be playing for less than your current salary.”

“But I’d be in Montreal.”

“But you’d be in Montreal. And it’s the Habs. So, up-voting French Canada.” Eric moves the ‘Canadiens’ bar higher. “Well, maybe it’s alright to go home for a season or two. As long as you don’t start buying vacation homes left and right, money isn’t going to be an issue for a long time.”

“Oh, so you don’t know about my harem full of handsome young men with a penchant for Italian race cars.”

Eric pulls the Stars logo off the board and tosses it into the pile of discarded teams. “I always thought it was suspicious we had six pool boys living in the guest house. So rude of you not to share.”

Jack laughs and tickles Eric’s side with his toes.

“You’re taking this surprisingly well.”

Eric wraps a hand around Jack’s ankle and pulls, the resulting tug of war causing the couch cushion to slide just enough for Jack to roll onto the floor.

“We’re forgetting something important,“ Jack grunts, sinking into the cushions as he tries to climb back up. "Customs.”

“Customs,” Eric sighs, flopping back into his chair. “Border security. That’ll definitely put a damper on things, won’t it? A whole extra fifteen minutes a trip. Wow. I don’t know if our marriage can handle that.”

"Bits,” Jack laughs and pulls Eric onto the floor with him.

“Nope. I’m sorry, we’ll have to get a divorce,” Eric laments, throwing an arm over his face and playing up his somewhat faded accent. “Seriously, though: is any of this helping? You only have a few days to decide.”

Jack pulls Eric tight against his side and nuzzles his neck – a move Eric has learned is right out of Guilty!Jack’s playbook.

“What aren’t you telling me?”

“I re-signed with the Falconers yesterday. Four years.“

"Wait, then what was all this for?”

“You put so much effort into it I didn’t want to ruin it.”

Eric snags a throw pillow and whaps Jack square in the face.

I can’t explain the feeling in a way that you can truly grasp how much it hurts me. To be away from you. To wish things were different for us. To long for the day when the distance between you and I is only as far as between the white linen sheets of our brand new king sized bed. I don’t know how to tell you that I feel like I’m missing something when I’m not with you. Like a part of my brain shuts down and can’t function properly or like my lungs give out and I can’t breathe the right air when you’re a country away from me. It’s a physical pain. A type of longing for you that I’ve never been so desperate for. My eyes stay wide when I should be sleeping. My fingers trace my pillow in hope of finding your heartbeat. My ears listen for a dedicated whisper that you love me and don’t want to lose me. My back craves your security from tightly resting your strong body against me. My lips want to gently kiss your rosy nose to sleep. My heart yearns to spill out all the words that I’ve never had the guts to say. And my arms. My arms just want to be wrapped around the only thing that has given me reason to be here. There’s a thousand miles between you and I, and every time I have to walk away in search of border security at the airport and look back to see your truck drive away, I feel a bullet to my heart and a desert in my throat, a sudden inability to walk forward and my slow breathes disappear. Nothing breaks me more than having to carry that feeling with me until the next time I can run into your arms.
—  you’re worth the distance but I need you closer

O. D. Emery stands on his farm in southeastern Texas. On the one side of his property is the Rio Grande River and Mexico. On the other, a 20 foot concrete and steel beam wall, guarded by border patrol. Emery’s father bought this land in the 1940s and he grows cotton and sugarcane on it. Under President George W. Bush, a barrier was put up here to stop the flow of drugs and immigrants coming in illegally. Emery has liked the results and thinks more walls should be put up in this area. “Who wouldn’t want the wall? Crooks? Illegals? They are the only ones who don’t want the wall. I don’t think we are going to build a wall across the bridges, you can still enter legally. You can still see your family or go shopping. We are just trying to stop the illegal activity.” 

– Lulu 

(Photo: NPR/Samantha Balaban) 

1933 uranus-pluto square - the rise of nazism, eugenics, dictatorship  

1870′s uranus-pluto square - an image depicts the savagery of european powers as they divide and declare colonisation of africa, each diplomatic waiting for his slice, the term plutocracy is developed

uranus square pluto current - increasing fear associated with border security and alt right ideology, mass displacement, generation of ISIS as a result of western occupancy

1960s uranus-pluto conjunct - vietnam war; use of napalm, mao tsendong effectuates communism in china

The sun sets over the Rio Grande River in south-eastern Texas.

All this week I’ve been posing a simple question: “What do you want people in other parts of the country to know about the border?”

The answers have been complex but there has been one overriding theme.

There is national debate over immigration, border security and trade with Mexico and this area has been getting a lot of attention from politicians and the media. And yet many of the people who live along the border feel their voices are not being heard.

Join Weekend Edition on Sunday, March 12th to listen to the opinions, hopes and fears of the people of the Rio Grande Valley.

- Lulu

(Photo: NPR/ Samantha Balaban)

Along the Rio Grande river in Roma Texas, Border Patrol discovers the artifacts of unathorized immigration: a pair of children’s plastic shoes, a toothbrush, a baby bottle, socks. In this part of the Rio Grande Valley, Central Americans fleeing violence have overtaken Mexicans as the largest demographic coming into the country illegally. One mother, travelling with her teenage son, began to cry as she detailed how the gangs in her native El Salvador were trying to recruit her son. She was detained by border patrol agents on a dirt road running parallel to the river. She says she will never go back to El Salvador.

- Lulu

(Photo: NPR/ Ravenna Koenig)

youtube

Why We Must All Fight for the Dream Act.

By repealing DACA – Deferred Action For Childhood Arrivals – Trump has endangered both these young immigrants and the economic security of America.

In 2012, the Obama  administration created DACA as a temporary way to address the needs of young people who came to America as infants or toddlers, and know no other country.  

To apply and qualify for DACA, these young people had to risk entering the system by giving their identifying information. Once approved, they were granted two years of “deferred action” on deportation, with the promise that they could reapply every two years indefinitely.

This allowed “dreamers” to go to college, get a job, and pay taxes without fear of deportation. DACA was never perfect, but for 800,000 immigrant youth it meant freedom from fear and an opportunity to fully contribute to the country they were raised in. 

But now these young people are threatened with deportation. 

For no reason. These young people are not taking jobs away from native-born Americans.  Even the conservative Cato Institute has said that the economic cost of cancelling DACA would be $200 billion over ten years.  And that’s just direct costs. The Center for American Progress estimates that if we lost these young workers the U.S. gross domestic product would shrink by $433 billion over the next decade.

The moral case is even more compelling than the economic one.

These kids grew up in America. To enter the DACA program they already had to step forward and show that they were contributing  to their communities and then prove it again every two years to stay in the program. It is immoral to now put them in the crosshairs of deportation.

This is just the latest effort by Trump to play to his base and divide us, but we must not allow that. Americans of all races and creeds must push congress to pass the Dream Act, and allow these young people to become American citizens – without the Act being a bargaining chip for more border security or anything else. 

These DACA young people are our neighbors, our colleagues, and our classmates. They represent the the best of the dream that my parents and most of our ancestors had when they came to America:  To make a better life for themselves, and for their kids.  Trump’s attempt to divide us and fuel our differences along racial and ethnic lines is an attack on the America I believe in, and we must not let it stand.  

That’s why the DACA fight is my fight, and why I stand with the dreamers – and I hope you will too.

Jim Darling is the Mayor of McAllen, TX. This city is an economic pump: it’s among the top sales tax collectors in Texas, because so many Mexicans come across to shop here. It’s also one of the busiest border crossings in the country, where goods and people move across, bolstering the economies of both nations. But revenue is down, amid an economic downturn in Mexico and the ratcheting up of rhetoric over the wall and NAFTA (the North American Free Trade Agreement) from the Trump administration. The Mayor has asked President Trump to come visit so he can see the reality of the border. He’s also made a recent trip to central Mexico after one of the governors called on Mexicans to boycott McAllen in protest of Trump’s stance. 

“It doesn’t help us economically. We’ve been kind of hurt by the rhetoric going on in Washington, more than any other community. When you had on that side (Mexico) some resentment of what was being said about who pays for a fence… and then you add it to (all the security that’s been put down here) and all that implied, we were affected by that more than anybody, because of our proximity to the border. We have Americans not wanting to come to our valley because it was considered unsafe. And then Mexicans not wanting to come here because of some of the resentment over the rhetoric.” 

- Lulu 

 (Photo: NPR/ Samantha Balaban)

I could hear the tapping as the border guard swung his stick against the rocker panels of my car. Trying not to sweat, I put on my best neutrally-bored commuter face while waiting for him to lose interest and go away. That’s when he swung a little too hard, and finally broke through one of the massive rust holes in my rockers.

A crackling sound, then the sound of dozens of spray cans of grey RTV falling on the asphalt, tumbling from the special smugglers’ compartments I had built into them. The border guard was at the window now, ordering me out of the car, onto the grass.

“What is this?” he finally asked, after he and his buddies had torn my car down to its constituent elements and only found aerosol cans within it.

“We can’t get it in Canada,” I whined, “and I really can’t draw a straight bead with the squeeze tubes!” I tried to make a gesture with my hands that mimicked having to caulk up an oil pan gasket, but it was very difficult with my hands in cuffs behind my back.

On the way home from the border, I noticed that somehow my heavily worn interior now had fewer rattles after the border guards had slapdash reassembled it in a huff. I smiled to myself, pleased that at least something good had come out of this.

title: the council
rating: T
summary: sarada uchiha is not one to be played.
author’s note: nothing can convince me that sarada isn’t the perfect balance of strong and sarcastic. she is the sasusaku lovechild.
disclaimer: i don’t own naruto, or any of it’s characters. all rights reserved to tv tokyo, shonen jump and kishimoto.
ps: am i supposed to capitalize the word sharingan? and the names of justus? the world may never know.


It’s true enough that she had her mother’s spirit—her slight akin for kindness and softness under her stone cold, black exterior. She had Sakura’s aptness and almost desperate need to want to heal and protect her loved ones, but she had always been her father’s daughter through and through.

From her hair to her eyes; from the way she hated anything over the top to the way she couldn’t stomach anything remotely sweet; from the way she was born a prodigy to the way everyone seemed to think she took up after Itachi.

Like her uncle, Sarada was a genius and the combination of her sharp eyes and mind let her see the shinobi world for what it truly was and it left her torn; a formidable ninja with the heart of a pacifist. She didn’t mind taking the medical route, but her Uchiha pride and blood didn’t allow to be anything less than the best ninja around town, nothing less than the best for those she loved. 

The love from an Uchiha is a love like no other; it’s deeper, louder, more intense, and not to be handed out lightly. There were few people Sarada could say she truly loved in the world—she didn’t dare extend it beyond her teammates and family. But the love she had for those select few ran deep to her very core and she vowed to herself to do nothing less than protect them until the day she died. She wouldn’t stand for anyone attempting to harm her loved ones, nor did she stand for any slander against them.

So when an elder of the Konoha council seethed about the dangers of the Uchiha and the threat they posed to village, Sarada didn’t blink twice at controlling her temper (she was Sakura and Sasuke’s child after all—she had a tempered unmatched by the most jealous and vengeful of gods).

“What did you just say?” Tone dangerously low, eyes all but barely open as she squinted in the direction of voice that had dared to insult her clan, her family.

Most would agree that a sixteen year old had no business attending a meeting for the clan heads and other important officials and notable shinobi of a major powerhouse in the allied nations. Except if that sixteen year old year girl was a clan head herself, the Captain of the Police Force and the strongest kunoichi of the newest generation of Konoha ninja.

Sarada sat at the lefthand most corner of the round table, to her right, Naruto sat loud and proud at the head of the table, Hanabi Hyuga to her left. Heads of other important Konoha clans sat in succession, followed by military leaders, ANBU captains, research division heads, Granny Tsunade, and the village elders.

The meeting had been called to discuss village security, given the staggering amounts of missing and dead ninja reports on top of requests for ninja escorts and guards from surrounding towns. Hanabi suggested stationing more Hyuga around the borders, to potentially foresee and prevent future attacks or suspicious activity. As head of investigation and interrogation, Ino suggested that Naruto send recon squads to spy and gather further information. Tsunade claimed they ought to focus on the barely living ninja that had been brought back to the hospital in shreds. Naruto listened intently, alarmed at the situation, but content that the group in front of him had such wonderful ideas. Until one of the elders opened their mouths.

“If you want Konoha to be safe, Hokage-sama, I say that you need to start with protecting people from the inside,” Lady Choi grunted. The gray haired woman was nearing 97 years old, but had the sass of a surly nineteen year old. In all there were five elders on the board, Lady Choi and her brother Meno by far the most conservative of the bunch.

“How do you suggest we do that, Lady Choi?” Naruto asked. Old people were never exactly his thing, but dealing with Lady Choi was like dealing with an angry Tsunade—not something he preferred to do.

“If you want this village to be safe, you ought to purge it of internal dangers. Start by getting rid of those murdering ministers in the Uchiha complex. That family has brought nothing but pain and torture to this village for years.”

Eyes at the round table went wide. While Lady Choi was conservative and snarky in conversation, she remained an elder, and few chose to openly reply to her with the same amount of sarcasm and sass that she dished out. Except for Sarada Uchiha.

“Excuse me?” She snarled. “What did you just say?”

Onyx eyes stay fixated on the old woman across the room. Exactly who did this raisin think she was?

“You heard me, child. Those damned Uchiha are the reason for half of the attacks on this village. Hokaga-sama, just how many times have we had rogue ninja sneak past border security looking for that cursed sharingan? They’re murders, a danger to the people of Konoha, and a threat to our security.”

“Murderers? And what do you call our Assassination ANBU unit? I suppose they’re a bunch of holy purgers, correct?” Sarada’s voice dripped sarcasm, her knuckles becoming whiter the harder she gripped on to the table.

“They’re given orders,” Choi retorted, “Those Uchiha kill at their own free will. Itachi Uchiha nearly killed his entire clan, what makes you—”

“Shutup.” Sarada’s voice ripped through the room at a dangerously low octave. All eyes on her, she stood up from her chair, hands firmly on the table, it took all of her strength not to activate mangekyou and end the old woman across from her.

“Who do you think you’re talking to, child? Show some respect.

If there was one thing Sarada hated in the world more than anything, it was being called a child. She had worked far too hard to be diminished to such a status. Her pride wouldn’t let her.

“This child is the head of the Uchiha clan.” she seethed. “You shut your mouth about my uncle, lady. He is not a murderer—”

“Where is your respect? I am a village elder, you ought to be arrested for talking to me like this.”

“Arrested? You’d think you’d know something for being an elder—you can’t arrest the Captain of the Police Force, grandma.”

Choi’s eyes went wide. “This is the new Police Captain, Hokage-sama?” she accused Naruto, bewildered that the youngest Uchiha held such a powerful title. “No matter, insolent child. You ought to have respect for—”

Respect is earned, not handed out like blankets in the winter,” dangerously dark eyes bore through the old woman, “You seem to be the only one not knowing who you’re dealing with here. Tch, you’d think for being as old as you are, you’d know basic social rankings around here.”

Sarada pushed back her chair and crossed her arms. “Village elders sit on a board, thrice removed from the right hand of the Hokage. On par with Clan Heads, first behind the Chief of the Medical Corp, second to the ANBU Black Ops, and third to and furthest removed from the Chief of Police,” she spat, “You’re a nothing but a political figurehead—you advise the Hokage and provide him with a primary source of historical events, but by no means do you have nearly as much power as anyone else at this table. In fact, any nominations or proposals you make and be checked and vetoed by Tsunade-sama, ANBU and me.

The room fell even more quiet than before. Some were shocked, others like Hanabi and Tsunade sat comfortably with a small grin on their face. To Sarada’s right, Naruto sat with his hands folded, chin resting in his palms with a signature grin settled on his face; the three of them had the same thought—just like Sakura.

“Say what you want about power,” Choi retorted. “That’s all you Uchiha are after anyway. I’ve seen too many rogue Uchiha in my lifetime and mark my words you’ll end up just like that monster Itachi, killing off his entire clan and—”

“Because you told him to,” Sarada roared. “If you’re going to talk about my uncle then tell the truth. You and your band of elders are the very people who ordered Itachi Uchiha to kill his family. You told a fifteen year old boy that the only way to save the village was by murdering his family and I’ll be damned if you think I’m going to sit here and let you spread lies about him. He is not a monster and the Uchiha are not murderers. Mind you we built this village—I will not sit here and let you spread lies about my family.”

Then Sarada did the unimaginable; leaned forward, grabbed Choi by her collar and brought her to her level.

“You mark my words: the Uchiha are not your pawns. If you think you can control and manipulate me and then conflate my story to fit your twisted beliefs, then you’re dead wrong. I am my uncle’s niece, my father’s daughter, but I am not the summation of their actions. I will tell their stories but don’t you dare try and tell mine. If you even so much as dare to tell the smallest lie about my family ever again, I’ll show you exactly what happened, so you won’t forget it,” sharingan swirling, Sarada let the old woman go, standing upright again.

“Am I understood?” the blood red of her sharingan piercing through Choi’s mind. Sarada hadn’t dared to activate a jutsu, but the proximity and sight of the legendary doujutsu had been enough to shut Choi’s mouth.

In the tradition of the Uchiha, Sarada leaned forward again, daring and unsatisfied, “I said, am I understood?”

Lady Choi inhaled sharply, looking at the ninja in front of her and around the room. When it was clear to her that not even the other elders were going to defend her, she hesitantly met the red eyes in front of her and nodded gravely, “Yes, Captain.”

With a satisfied smirk, Sarada brushed off her flak jacket and took her seat again, turning to Naruto as if to say she was ready for the meeting to resume.

The blonde Hokage gave his goddaughter a reassuring smile, and looked to Tsunade who had the same look on her face—Sarada Uchiha was most definitely her father’s daughter.

On Border Security they’re doing a check on a guy taking his laptop and tablet with him across the border and they asked him if there were any pornographic photos, he said drawings that he had done are on there.

The officers asked him if any of these pornographic drawings depicted children or animals (cause you know, even if its a drawing, its still considered child porn/beastiality under the law!)

The guy said no children; but that there were… anthropomorphic animals engaged in sexual situations.

The officers had to look through this man’s furry porn collection and attempt to determine whether or not “furries” constitute as beastiality, and based on their reactions, they were more than confused by this guy and the fact that he makes money off of drawing anthropomorphic wolves and cats fucking each other.

Because there was no human + animal sex, he was admissible to Canada.

Sadly, because of his insufficient funds, he had to withdraw his application and go back to the US, but I just find it funny that two professional officers pulled a dude in a wolf-tail out of a line up and looked through his furry porn to see whether or not he was allowed into the country.

Poor guy.

politico.com
BREAKING: Trump has decided to end DACA, with 6-month delay
Senior White House aides met Sunday afternoon to discuss how to roll out the controversial move affecting hundreds of thousands of Dreamers.

Donald Trump has decided to end the Obama-era program that grants work permits to undocumented immigrants who arrived in the country as children, according to two sources familiar with his thinking. Senior White House aides huddled Sunday afternoon to discuss the rollout of a decision likely to ignite a political firestorm — and fulfill one of the president’s core campaign promises.

Trump has wrestled for months with whether to do away with the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, known as DACA. He has faced strong warnings from members of his own party not to scrap the program and struggled with his own misgivings about targeting minors for deportation.

Conversations with Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who argued that Congress — rather than the executive branch — is responsible for writing immigration law, helped persuade the president to terminate the program, the two sources said, though White House aides caution that — as with everything in the Trump White House — nothing is set in stone until an official announcement has been made.

In a nod to reservations held by many lawmakers, the White House plans to delay the enforcement of the president’s decision for six months, giving Congress a window to act, according to one White House official. But a senior White House aide said that chief of staff John Kelly, who has been running the West Wing policy process on the issue, “thinks Congress should’ve gotten its act together a lot longer ago.”

Trump is expected to announce his decision on Tuesday, and the White House informed House Speaker Paul Ryan of the president’s decision on Sunday morning, according to a source close to the administration. Ryan had said during a radio interview on Friday that he didn’t think the president should terminate DACA, and that Congress should act on the issue.

Neither the White House not a spokesman for Ryan immediately responded to requests for comment.

The president’s expected announcement is likely to shore up his base, which rallied behind his broader campaign message about the importance of enforcing the country’s immigration laws and securing the border. At the same time, the president’s decision is likely to be one of the most contentious of his early administration, opposed by leaders of both parties and by the political establishment more broadly.

The White House and Congress have tried to pass the issue off on each other – with each arguing that the other is responsible for determining the fate of the approximately 800,000 undocumented immigrants who are benefiting from DACA. Though most Republicans believe that rolling back DACA is a solid legal decision, they are conscious of the difficult emotional terrain. Utah Sen. Orrin Hatch joined Ryan in cautioning Trump against rolling back the program.

The president is likely to couch his decision in legalese. Many on the right, even those who support protections for children brought into the country illegally through no fault of their own, argue that DACA is unconstitutional because former President Barack Obama carried it out unilaterally instead of working through Congress.

Some Republican lawmakers, including Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, have said that Congress needs to pass a law to protect the so-called Dreamers.

“My hope is that as part of this process we can work on a way to deal with this issue and solve it through legislation, which is the right way to do it and the constitutional way to do it,” Rubio told CNN in June.

Trump’s expected decision to scrap DACA represents another challenge for Ryan and fellow congressional Republicans, who are facing an end-of-September deadline to avert a government shutdown and government debt default, while also tackling a Hurricane Harvey relief package and a major tax reform push.

Ai Weiwei, “Good Fences Make Good Neighbors.”

“The fence has always been a tool in the vocabulary of political landscaping and evokes associations with words like ‘border,’ ‘security,’ and ‘neighbor,’ which are connected to the current global political environment,” 

“But what’s important to remember is that while barriers have been used to divide us, as humans we are all the same. Some are more privileged than others, but with that privilege comes a responsibility to do more,”

New York Public Art Fund  40th Anniversary Celebrations.

Good Fences Make Good Neighbors will be on view October 12, 2017 – February 11, 2018 at sites throughout New York City.