border patrols

One of my friends from school was kidnapped this week by ICE

Cal State Los Angeles student Claudia Rueda taken by ICE this morning. Please mobilize and spread the word #FreeClaudia

“Early this morning, Border Patrol conducted a raid in Boyle Heights kidnapping Claudia Rueda outside her home in Boyle Heights, immigrant rights organizer with the Los Angeles Immigrant Youth Coalition and student at Cal State Los Angeles. Claudia most recently lead a campaign to free her mom, Teresa, from ICE detention after Border Patrol agents similarly kidnapped Teresa from their home.

When the officials showed up this morning, family members knew not to open the door since the agents couldn’t produce a warrant. But they got to Claudia anyway while she was outside moving the family’s car. For several hours her family had no idea where she was.

Claudia has lived in the US nearly her entire life. She participated in college-prep programs, was a student at UC Santa Cruz, and transferred to Cal State LA where she is currently studying Latin American Studies and has the support of many professors and campus organizations.Claudia has been preparing for apply for DACA but had been unable to gather the money for the filing fees.

Claudia’s best friend states: “Claudia is an extremely supportive, empowering, and hard working friend. All throughout high school, she encouraged students to continue their studies in higher education, becoming involved in afterschool programs like ESCALERA. Throughout our college career, she has continuously supported me, offered her home, and her wisdom to continue being a hardworking student and following our passions.”

Call Border Patrol in Chula Vista at 619-498-9750 to demand DHS not initiate removal proceedings and release Claudia to let her apply for DACA and get back to her family and completing finals.

“Hi, my name is ________________, and I am a concerned community member calling in support of Claudia Sarahi Rueda Vidal, DOB: 1/15/95, a DACA eligible youth, college student and beloved community member from Boyle Heights. Claudia has been a mentor in the community to other youth and has long fought for justice for others. I demand that Border Patrol release her to her family and community to let her apply for DACA with USCIS.”

FIGHT DEPORTATIONS BY ANY MEANS NECESSARY!
FIGHT ICE WITH FIRE!


*** this is a copy and paste from her group’s Facebook. Claudia was head of a group of people that collaborated with my MSA and BLACK student union as well as the transgender rights/undocumented students group TRUCHA at our school. This is clearly a targeted attack because of her activism. I desperately need everyone’s help in trying to free her.

When 2-month-old Isaac Enrique Sanchez was diagnosed with pyloric stenosis, a condition that causes vomiting, dehydration and weight loss in infants, his parents were told that their son’s condition was curable. The problem was that no hospital in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas had a pediatric surgery team capable of performing the operation on his stomach.

To make Isaac well, Oscar and Irma Sanchez would need to take their infant son to Driscoll Children’s Hospital, in Corpus Christi, Texas. It was just a couple of hours up the highway, but for them it was a world away.

The Sanchezes, who are undocumented, would need to pass a Border Patrol checkpoint.

While they pondered their predicament in a Harlingen, Texas, hospital, a Border Patrol agent showed up in the waiting room — Oscar Sanchez suspects a nurse turned them in — and said he could arrange for officers to escort the parents through the checkpoint to Corpus. But the agent said when they arrived, they would be arrested and put into deportation proceedings. The couple agreed.

Border Patrol Arrests Parents While Infant Awaits Serious Operation

Photo: John Burnett/NPR

This is Sister Norma Pimentel, the Executive Director for Catholic Charities in the Rio Grande Valley. She’s standing in the Parish Hall of the Sacred Heart Church in McAllen, which she converted to a makeshift supply center for migrant families in 2014. At that time the surge of unaccompanied minors from Central America had overloaded Border Patrol facilities, and they were releasing families where the parents were present in order to make room for the unaccompanied kids. 

Sister Norma opened this center so those families would have somewhere to come for clothing, food, water, and showers, before continuing their journey. 

“We welcome them the moment they walk through those doors of Sacred Heart Parish Hall. We have our volunteers clap and say ‘welcome, bienvenidos.’ And just that moment starts a transformation of the family where they feel for the very first time they matter, that their lives are important to others…And they feel overwhelmed with gratefulness because of the fact that for the very first time in their journeys, of what they’ve been through, they finally arrive to a place that’s caring and compassionate. And the volunteers are wonderful in making sure they get everything they need so that they can truly restore their dignity after the great journey and hardships that they went through.”

– Ravenna 

(Photo: Samantha Balaban/NPR)

The Department of Homeland Security issued new guidelines this week that call for hiring 15,000 additional Border Patrol agents and immigration officers. It also wants to greatly expand the number of unauthorized immigrants who are prioritized for deportation.

But between arrest and possible repatriation, those swept up will have court dates. Right now, that can take time.

That’s because there are only 300 immigration judges in the country, and pending cases are at a record high. On average, each judge has a backlog of about 1,800 cases to hear. That leads to lengthy delays, said Deep Gulasekaram, who teaches constitutional and immigration law at Santa Clara University.

“It’s early 2017 now; it’s not unusual to see court dates for people that are in 2020, late 2020,” he said. “So we’re thinking three years hence for when you actually get your case heard.”

Overwhelmed Courts Could Limit Impact Of Adding Immigration Officers

Photo: Sandy Huffaker/AFP/Getty Images

My dad is awesome.

This one is kinda short but I remember feeling amazing despite my age.

So when I was like nine or ten we had just taken a trip to Arizona. At one point we decided to take a drive over the border to Mexico for an evening with an old family friend that had a home there.

All went well, the dinner was lovely. But, the drive back into the US is hell. The line is like fifty miles long of pissed off drivers and flower salesman. Being nine, I somehow didn’t blow my brains out from being so bored we were in line for maybe six hours, and all was going swimmingly. Then this asshole driving in the far right lane (which was reserved for border patrol or something, I assume) suddenly tries to cut in front of us. Everyone is honking but he’s just flipping people off and smirking as he inches his car into the gap inbetween our car the one in front of us.

We had a rental so we could just up and ram his car much as I’d assume we wanted to, so my dad calmly gets out of the car and stands in front of this jerks car. The jerk starts honking his own car. My dad, brilliant as all hell, simply does that guardians of the galaxy middle finger windup to him, then proceeds to do about six or seven other variations on flipping this dude the bird. By now the people in the cars around us are all laughing and pointing at this guy and some of them are even flipping him off too.

All the loud honking had drawn the attention of a border patrol car somewhere up the line, and we heard a honk as it suddenly pulled up next to this guy. The agent got out, saw what was happening, and calmly told the man to go to the back of the line. Which was like a whole six hour wait behind us. Mister asshole decides to start defending himself, and the border patrol agent shuts him up and says “if you were in the wrong here, so many people wouldn’t be laughing at you right now.”

He drove away towards the rear of the line and we comfortably waited five more hours to get back into the US.

4

Nico was in border patrol, but it was just so he could  be surprised.

Can you believe this could be the first time Nico can celebrate his birthday with people that like him since his mother died? :))

I really hate how the news (or people in general) talks about those who don’t evacuating and when they call them “idiots” or “crazy.” Like, there’s a lot of reasons that people don’t evacuate that go beyond “being stubborn.” 

  • Older people and people with disabilities have a harder time leaving, especially those who don’t have anyone to help them/check in on them. 

  • People may not hear or understand the severity of the storm and the warning to leave. Modernly this is way less likely because of phones, television, radio notifications, etc. However there are still some people without access to these things or there might be a language barrier issue. 

  • There were announcements that ICE would not be checking your immigration status to access shelters during Harvey. However the risk of Border Patrol picking people up was still a threat. This kind of hostility and threat makes it less likely that undocumented people/families leave to safe shelters. 

  • Despite the PETS Act, there are still places that haven’t been allowing pets. Many people don’t want to leave their pets alone during the danger so they stay with them.

  • Leaving costs money and access to transportation - something that many people, particularly in lower income areas can’t afford/don’t have access to.

There’s actually a lot of reasons that people get left behind or chose to stay behind and instead of calling them “idiots” we could actually work to make sure these vulnerable groups do have means to get out and are going to be safe when they leave. Try to encourage change, raise awareness to these groups, and help with organizations that aid with this work during this time. 

6

Trump praised Muhammad Ali in his Black History Month speech– but his border patrol agents had just detained Muhammad Ali, Jr. because he’s Muslim

Trump’s less than four-minute address was full of both racism and delusion. The president started his speech by praising known black leaders. Meanwhile, Ali, Jr. was detained even though he’s a U.S. citizen who was born in Philadelphia and was flying to Fort Lauderdale, Florida, from Jamaica.

Gifs: The White House

LGBT movies I recommend!

Brokeback Mountain 

(I really hope you have already seen this tho, its a classic. Jake Gyllenhaal and Heath Ledger plays two shepherds falling in love in 1960 Wyoming)

Jongens 

(Dutch, two teenage boys fall in love and deals with it) 

Freier Fall 
(German, two police officers, one with a baby on the way, develops feelings for one another. One of my favourite movies of all time) 

Keep reading

7

Wild horse border patrol

Prisoners participating in the Wild Horse Inmate Program train mustangs that will eventually be adopted by the U.S. Border Patrol, providing the agency with inexpensive but agile horses, and inmates with skills and insights they hope to one day carry with them from prison. (Reuters)

Photo credits: Mike Blake/Reuters, Jim Urquhart/Reuters

See more photos of program and our other slideshows on Yahoo News.

bzfd.it
A  Very Short Story About Pirate Librarians
"In the fourth month a border patrol boat shot at them when they tried to pull in to the national harbor. So, no more storytimes."
By Danielle Evans

Veronica admits there was a moment when she thought this was going to be glamorous. Everything was only just beginning to go to hell: walls and checkpoints going up, a scattershot of environmental disasters, self-declared militias on patrol. It seemed like a good plan they had, to be on a boat for a while. It was the kind of idea people had early on, when it still seemed possible that it would end soon enough and well enough, when the present seemed like an opportunity to make history. The kind of story a plucky filmmaker would love twenty years from now: mild mannered booksellers become pirate librarians! A thing they could tell their grandkids.

The pirate business was mostly theoretical. Performance art as much as anything. They raised the money for the boat on gofundme and bought it cheap from a photographer with dual citizenship who had decided to wait things out in Europe. It was a boat and not a ship, even after they painted it and gave it a handmade flag. They were going to sail the great loop, hang out doing banned book readings from port to port, then go home and fundraise for part two, a more elaborate trip involving cutting through Panama and sailing up the west coast. At one of the early read-ins they wore pirate costumes, but only because the local community theatre had donated them at their launch party.

Guns are easier to get now than ibuprofen.

Now, she and Grace are always in leggings and worn out tees, the kind of shirts her husband would have mocked her for wearing even to bed, if she still had a husband, which she did when this started. It has never been as heroic an endeavor as she hoped. They wanted to promote reading and storytelling and art and truth and for three months that was considered safely theatrical because mostly it was, and in the fourth month a border patrol boat shot at them when they tried to pull in to the national harbor. So, no more storytimes.

Continue reading.

Note: This piece was originally written for and performed at Symphony Space’s Selected Shorts: Flash Fiction event in partnership with BuzzFeed Books.

Can US Customs and Border officials search your phone?

Recent detentions and seizures of phones and other material from travelers to the United States have sparked alarm. Below, ProPublica details what powers US Customs and Border Protection officials have over you and your devices.

A NASA scientist heading home to the US said he was detained in January at a Houston airport, where US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers pressured him for access to his work phone and its potentially sensitive contents. Last month, CBP agents checked the identification of passengers leaving a domestic flight at New York’s John F. Kennedy Airport during a search for an immigrant with a deportation order. And in October, border agents seized phones and other work-related material from a Canadian photojournalist. They blocked him from entering the US after he refused to unlock the phones, citing his obligation to protect his sources. These and other recent incidents have revived confusion and alarm over what powers border officials actually have and, perhaps more importantly, how to know when they are overstepping their authority.

The unsettling fact is that border officials have long had broad powers — many people just don’t know about them. Border officials, for instance, have search powers that extend 100 air miles inland from any external boundary of the US. That means border agents can stop and question people at fixed checkpoints dozens of miles from US borders. They can also pull over motorists whom they suspect of a crime as part of “roving” border patrol operations.

Sowing even more uneasiness, ambiguity around the agency’s search powers — especially over electronic devices — has persisted for years as courts nationwide address legal challenges raised by travelers, privacy advocates and civil-rights groups. We dug out answers about the current state-of-play when it comes to border searches, along with links to more detailed resources (below).

Original post on the TED-Ed Blog. Click below to read further!

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In his address to Congress last week, President Trump said this about the kinds of people his immigration agents are singling out for deportation:

“We are removing gang members, drug dealers and criminals that threaten our communities and prey on our very innocent citizens. Bad ones are going out as I speak.”

Then why, some Houstonians are asking, did immigration agents target Piro Garcia, the owner of two popular taco trucks on the city’s south side?

“Hi friends, good afternoon! I’m Piro, making fresh gorditas for you,” says the grinning taco king of South Post Oak Road, on an old Facebook video. He’s wearing a red ball cap, standing inside his taco truck, throwing dough on the grill.

Piro is Armando Garcia Mendez, 41 years old. He was born in Guatemala and fled to the United States in 1994 to avoid conscription by the armed forces in the midst of a civil war. He was caught by the Border Patrol and deported the first time. Then he tried again, and made it to Houston.

Garcia has spent the last 23 years living out the immigrant success story. He started as a restaurant cook and went on to own two taco trucks.

But last month, his life changed abruptly.

Piro’s Taco Trucks Are Beloved. Now He’s Facing Deportation

Photo: John Burnett/NPR