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The Jungle Book

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An orphan boy is raised in the Jungle with the help of a pack of wolves, a bear and a black panther.

The Jungle Book {{2016}}

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The man-cub Mowgli flees the jungle after a threat from the tiger Shere Khan. Guided by Bagheera the panther and the bear Baloo, Mowgli embarks on a journey of self-discovery, though he also meets creatures who don’t have his best interests at heart.

The Jungle Book 2016

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An orphan boy is raised in the Jungle with the help of a pack of wolves, a bear and a black panther.

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Doctor Strange - Trailer #2

Starring Rachel McAdams, Benedict Cumberbatch, & Tilda Swinton

In theaters November 4, 2016 (USA)

anonymous asked:

I absolutely loved that part in the movie where Sweeney and Mrs. Lovett were shown through the broken mirror, it's like that shot tells many stories about their lives and how they've become themselves. The movie has a lot of brilliant camera shots i think the movie is kind of underrated.

I 1,000% agree with you there. I honestly think the Sweeney Todd movie is such a cinematic masterpiece. Like, Tim Burton always has pretty neat aesthetics, but the cinematography for Sweeney Todd is just…iconic. I definitely love the close up shots like the broken mirror and the reflection in the razor and in Epiphany when we see Sweeney’s reflection in that puddle of water; all those shots are so intimate and important since Sweeney doesn’t have many lines so this is the only way we sort of get into his head.

But also while we’re on the topic of camera shots, can I just say- the wide shots in the film are so incredible too! Because this movie does what the stage version can’t do- it connects the main characters to their environment and allows for a bigger picture. The stage version is very good at keeping the drama high and having the audience invested, because we basically get to live in Mrs.Lovett’s pie shop for a good majority of the show. But the movie really lets the audience explore Sweeney’s version of London, and it’s just this entire universe that’s so unique. When Sweeney talks about the world being “filled with people who are filled with shit,” we actually get to see the crowds of people and the polluted London streets and so it really gives some credibility to Sweeney’s philosophy. 

One of my absolute favorite shots in the entire film is when Sweeney says “At last, my arm is complete again” and the camera zooms out of the shop and we see all of London. It just really emphasizes how small Sweeney is, which I think is important. This is just one person who thinks he’s making a change by killing these innocent people but like..he’s just one fish in a very big pond, and when he dies, no one will remember him. He’s not some big anti-hero out to teach society a lesson. He’s one man, with a self-destructive thirst for revenge. And same with Mrs.Lovett. Worst Pies may be a show-stopping number but I absolutely love how Tim put in the sequence in right before that song where we literally get to travel through the streets of London and see how immensely huge and depressingly disgusting it is. Mrs.Lovett’s failing shop is just one of many. She’s nothing special, and I actually like that they decided to shoot it that way.

Long story short: I’m really fucking invested in this movie

Waiting is one of life’s hardships. It is hard enough to wait for chocolate cream pie while burnt roast beef is still on your plate. It is plenty difficult to wait for Halloween when the tedious month of September is still ahead of you. But to wait for one’s adopted uncle to come home while a greedy and violent man is upstairs was one of the worst waits the Baudelaires had ever experienced.  

The Reptile Room -The Puttanesca Project

Angela Bassett as Doctor Waller in Green Lantern (2011)

Synopsis: Reckless test pilot Hal Jordan is granted an alien ring that bestows him with otherworldly powers that inducts him into an intergalactic police force, the Green Lantern Corps.

Written by Greg Berlanti, Michael Green, Marc Guggenheim, and Michael Goldenberg

Directed by Martin Campbell

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