books sculpture

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Great Britain: The Phone Box - Braughing, Oxford, Braemar, Standon, Prestbury, Great Malvern, Montacute, Much Hadham, Snowshill, London/Kingston

-for more  of my UK shots and more travel:

travel britain european travel world travel UK travel London travel

Image: Theodor Geisel in his home work room in La Jolla, Calif., in 1957. (Gene Lester/Getty Images)

Decades before he became a best-selling children’s book author, Dr. Seuss, a.k.a. Theodor Geisel, created a series of sculptures he called his “Unorthodox Taxidermy.” Using real horns, beaks and antlers, he fashioned whimsical creatures which look like they jumped right out of his books.

Now a traveling show of replicas, called “If I Ran the Zoo”, has landed at a gallery in Long Island. We bring you that story (how else?) in verse: Before His Name Was Known At All, Seuss Put Creatures On The Wall

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Had to split up my posts. Lol

I decided to take a few with Bendy interacting with my old college text book.

The Illusion of Living book in game is obviously a reference to The Illusion of Life. Being the mighty ham, I am I HAD to do this.

Fun fact: Our professors might of made us read maybe 2 chapters for school and gave us photocopies of everything else.

I’ve read the whole thing cover to cover, if you can get your hands on a copy I definitely recommend reading it if you have any interest in animation or the history of Disney and animation.

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I FORGOT TO POST THIS! AHHHH!!!  Okay, this was a wedding gift for my friend @serialoutput and @blogssuchasthis! They both love steampunk/vintage stuff so I thought I attempt to make a small decorative model (around the size of two palms) with that certain aesthetic. (Books, Candles, goggles, top hat, bottles with multicolor “chemicals”, bookends holding books, and keys.)  I hope you both enjoy it!!

Disclaimer: I am not soooo familiar with the steampunk aesthetic but I really enjoy it!

Materials used:

Polymer clay
Painted Resin
Miniature Bottle
Acrylic paint
Chalk Pastels

Andrea del Verrocchio (1435-1488)
“Christ and St. Thomas” (1467–1483)
Bronze
Renaissance
Located at the Orsanmichele, Florence, Italy

The sculpture depicts the episode that gave rise to the term “Doubting Thomas.” During which Thomas the Apostle had doubted the resurrection of Jesus and had to feel the wounds that had been inflicted during his crucifixion for himself, in order to be convinced that it was really Jesus who had risen from the dead (John 20:24-29).