bookmrk

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i’ve gotten a couple asks about making a handwriting tag, so here it is! i haven’t made any original content in ages because i moved to seattle this month, so now hopefully that hiatus will be over haha

🎵 yam yam - no vacation

self-care instruction manual
  1. forgive yourself : it’s okay if you didn’t wake up early, go for a run, or finish that assignment. you’re only human
  2. start slow : don’t set your expectations too high when you’re just starting off
  3. keep learning : getting to where you want to be is a process. don’t expect perfection overnight
  4. be kind to yourself : you’ll make mistakes along the way, but don’t let that stop you
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2nd week // october (ft. the flower i picked right outside our door)

aka my stress week. let’s look on the bright side tho. it was a productive one. want to see how i made this spread?? check out my journal with me video!

song of the week // monday loop - tomppabeats

Maximize your sleeping time (aka how to be a lazy asshole and sleep in)

Would you prefer waking up at 7:50 than at 7? Or maybe you’re a Tired College Student™ like me who’s in their second semester just waiting for the sweet release of death? Either way, today I’m going to be v non-studyblr and show you how you too can be a lazy asshole and sleep in.

  • Lay out your clothes the night before. If you feel like trash sweater + leggins takes 2 mins to put on and feels like PJs
    • If you shower at night just sleep in your leggins tbh.
  • If you have bangs do them the night before and sleep on your back. If you can’t keep still, wear headphones bc they’ll keep you from turning. It’s better for your back anyway.
  • Brush your hair before bed and tie it up so that it’s faster to brush in the morning.
    • Tbh smoothing the ends and the top layer works just as well.
    • Get a Tangle Teezer. It’ll save you so much time.
  • If you plan on using dry shampoo, do It the night before. It’ll absorb way more oil and you just have to brush it and go in the morning.
  • If you wear makeup, have all your basics in one easy to reach place.
    • If you take the bus or sth just do your makeup there. 
    • If you need to wet your beauty blender, carry a mini spray bottle of water in your makeup bag.
  • Carry rollerballs of perfume in your backpack so that you don’t have to waste time putting it on.
  • Have your fucking backpack ready the night before.
  • Have a designated place near the door for the shit you need to carry (keys, glasses, USBs, idk). If you know what shoes you’re gonna wear, put them in front of the door and leave everything you need inside of them.
  • Putting on a coat is faster if it’s hung on a chair than if it’s hung on a hanger.
  • Breakfast is essential. Doesn’t mean you can’t just take it with you and eat it during break or on your way to school.
    • Make it the night before and put it in the fridge if it’’s temperature sensitive. Avocado toast can be turned into a mess free sandwich js. Also you can make overnight oats in a mason jar and take them with you.
  • Same with coffee. Honestly at this point just carry a bottle of it in your backpack. It lasts for like three days.

And that’s how to be a Slightly More Rested Mess. I realize this is not for everyone but hey, desperate times call for desperate meassures.

More posts

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december 30, 2017 - studyblr gif aesthetics

“when you’re in university or college, nobody is gonna babysit you. there’s no bell that goes off when it’s class time. there’s no attendance. you can skip all the classes if you want to. you really just have to take everything into your own hands and make the most of your experience…everything you need to succeed is right in front of you.” —kassie isabelle

featuring clips from jordan clark, lavendaire, krist & yu, rowena tsai, and tbhstudying!

currently listening to: “love & kindness” - meltycanon

Taking textbook notes is a chore. It’s tedious and boring and sometimes challenging, but hopefully these tips will help you improve your skill and shorten the time it takes you to do textbook notes!

Give yourself time: Realistically, you can’t knock out 30 pages of notes in 20 minutes. Take your time with textbook notes so they’re a good studying tool in the future. The general rule is to take how many pages you have to do and multiply it by 5: that’s how many minutes it’ll take you to do the notes.

  • Also, divide you notes up into manageable chunks to increase your productivity. I am personally a huge fan of using pomodoro timers, and I adjust the intervals for however long I need to.

Skim before you start taking notes: If time is an issue, don’t read your 40 page in depth before even picking up a pen, but make sure you know what you’re reading about by skimming a bit ahead of your notes. Read over section titles, and look at charts, maps, or graphs. Writing and highlighting as you read the chapter for the first time isn’t effective because you don’t know if a sentence will be important or not, so make sure you’re reading a paragraph or section in advance before writing.

Use the format they give you in the book to help take your notes: In a lot of textbooks, there will be a mini outline before the chapter itself that shows all the headings and subheadings. Those will be your guidelines! I find this super helpful because long chapters can be daunting to go into without any structure. If you don’t have one of those, use the headings and subheadings provided for you. If you haven’t already been doing this, it will help you so much.

Read actively: It’s so easy to “read” a textbook without digesting any information, but that is the last thing you want to do. Not only does it make taking notes a million times harder, but you’ll be lost in class discussions because you didn’t understand the reading. To keep from passively reading, highlight, underline, star any important information in the book itself.

  • Have a color coding system for highlighting or underlining and write down a key somewhere (here’s a few that you can adjust for your needs: x,x)
  • Use sticky notes or tabs to mark any questions or important points to come back to

Summarize important information and paraphrase: When taking the actual notes, don’t copy down full sentences word for word. Not only does writing full sentences waste a lot of time, it’s not an effective way to learn. If you can paraphrase the information, then you understand it. It’s also easier to study notes which are in your own words instead of textbook academia writing.

Be selective: You shouldn’t be writing down every fact that comes up in your textbook. If a fact ties into the bigger topic and provides evidence, then it’s probably something to keep, but you don’t need every piece of supplemental information (but do make sure you always write down the vocab). Learn your teacher’s testing style to help you decide what to write down. Could this be on the quiz/test? If the answer is yes, make sure you write it down.

Learn to abbreviate: Just like writing full sentences, writing out full words will waste time. Implement some shortenings (make sure to use ones that you’ll understand later!) into your notes. Some common ones are: b/c=because, gov=government, w/o=without, and here’s a great list of a ton of examples of abbreviations and shortenings.

Answer margin and review questions: A lot of textbooks have margin questions on every page or so that sum up what’s really important about that information. Make sure not to skip them because they’re really helpful for understanding. Write them down and answer them clearly in your notes. Most textbooks also have review questions after the chapter that check for reading comprehension, so make sure to answer those because they’ll show you if you really understood the chapter.

Don’t skip over visual sources: Maps, diagrams, illustrations, charts, and any other visuals in textbooks are so helpful. If you’re a visual learner, these things will be so essential to you and how you understand what you’re reading. Charts, tables, and diagrams sometimes also summarize information, so if you’re a visual learner it might benefit you to copy those down instead of writing it out.

  • Add visuals if it’ll help you: As said above, copying down charts, tables, illustrations, or diagrams can be super helpful for visual learners. They’re clear and concise, so pay attention to them.

Write your notes in a way that’s effective and makes sense to you: Mindmaps, Cornell notes, or plain outline notes are all really good forms of notetaking. Find which one works best for you to understand them and which one is most effective for your class, and use it (stuff on mindmaps and cornell notes).

Combine your class and textbook notes: If you rewrite your class notes, add in information you think is relevant from your textbook notes. Mark anything both your book and teacher said were important–you don’t want to forget any of that. If you don’t rewrite class notes, then put stars next to anything repeated.