book-discussion

Last year I launched The #DiverseBook2k16 Project and as part of it I explored three different area’s of LGBTQ+ representation in YA lit.

And what better time to throwback than Pride Month 🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈🏳️‍🌈 Check out the 3 links below to see all the LGBTQ+ discussions and book recommendations!


LGB (#DiverseBooks2k16LGB) - Looking at Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual representation.

QA+ (#DiverseBooks2k16QA) - Exploring Queer/Questioning, Asexuality and any other sexuality that isn’t Lesbian, Gay or Bi.

Gender (#DiverseBooks2k16Gender) - Focusing on gender diversity.

i wish i had like really great friends who were spontaneous and loved me and we could go to museums on saturdays?? hikes on sundays??? study together at the library on mondays?? we could go see movies and critique them together. draw and paint on friday nights, help each other decorate our rooms, we could read books together then discuss like i just want some pure and positive friends…where y'all at

[Revised 2/17] Books for Witches, Diviners and Spellcasters

Hi, everyone. A while back (a long time ago, actually), I started an annotated bibliography on books about witchcraft and magick, and I’ve updated it once (last November). 

Since then, I’d been keeping a list of things I need to add to it, but didn’t get around to actually reworking and updating the list a second time until today. Largely because I can’t really go outside much today because of the smog. But anyways, here it is. I’ve also included divination-related books in this version, whereas previously they were separate.

I hope you find something on here that suits your fancy! Happy reading! Also, yes, I do want to do more book reviews on this blog, so if you’d like a longer review of one of the books listed below, let me know and I can write one.

For Absolute Beginners

Encyclopedia of Witchcraft, by Judika Illes. Even better than the Weiser Field Guide to Witches - this book is huge and chock-full of information. It’ll explain in easy-to-understand language how the concept has developed throughout time, why witches do what they do, and different types of witches.

The Weiser Field Guide to Witches, by Judika Illes. This gives an excellent look at the historical lore concerning witches, from the perspective of a witch herself. It’s kind of tongue-in-cheek, but it does have some information that won’t be found elsewhere.

The Modern Guide to Witchcraft, by Skye Alexander. Great book for those who’re really absolute beginners and are wondering what witchcraft is all about. Skye takes a very postmodern, utilitarian, and unfailingly honest approach, and it’s geared towards those of almost any belief system.

Grimoire for the Apprentice Wizard, by Oberon Zell-Ravenheart. Attractively packaged and readible for almost all ages, this is a great (mostly) non-denominational look at the foundations of magical practice. It’s extremely detailed. Some of it only applies to Zell’s own tradition, but it’s quite useful, anyways.

Basic Techniques

Protection and Reversal Magick, by Jason Miller. This gets a little woo-woo at times, but he gives good advice on how to avoid serious problems that can come up as you begin to practice. Take with a grain of salt, though - some of this has the potential to make you feel paranoid.

City Magick, by Christopher Penczak. If you’re at all interested in tech witchery, or just want to practice magick within an urban setting, do check this out. It is by far the best look at the subject I’ve seen, and his discussion of urban tutelary spirits is worth the price alone.

Power Spellcraft for Life, by Arin Murphy-Hiscock. Nicely done, quite secular book providing basic beginner information regarding writing original spells and workings. It does fall prey to the trap of just listing correspondences with little information at times, but also contains a great deal of detail about ritual timing, raising power, and other topics essential for the beginner.

Sorcerer’s Secrets, by Jason Miller. This is a decent volume that describes a lot of techniques you don’t usually see in books, such as gesture and gaze-based magick. Be warned that Miller writes extensively about manipulative techniques, but it’s useful theory regardless of how you put it into practice.

Witch’s Bag of Tricks, by Melanie Marquis. This is not recommended for beginners, because the whole point of this book is to help existing practitioners refine and improve their already-established techniques. It’s got some novel ideas in it, and I like the author’s approach to symbolism in spellcasting.

Direct Magick (Energy Work)

The Un-Spell Book, by Mya Om. This non-denominational guide to working with magical forces is filled with useful exercises that go beyond the author’s previous work. I recommend reading this after reading Energy Essentials.

Instant Magick, by Christopher Penczak. Excellent beginner’s guide for those who don’t have access to a lot of fancy tools or prefer to work without them. This book won’t instantly teach you magick, but it will help even a seasoned practitioner find quicker, less-complicated ways of achieving results.

Energy Essentials for Witches and Spellcasters, by Mya Om. Though I balk at the use of the term “energy” to describe magical forces, this book is worth a look. It’s a bit like a workbook, with various exercises. Expect a lot of pseudoscience, though, and there are many religious references, but the techniques are solid.

Hedgewitchery and Astral Travel

Ecstatic Witchcraft, by Gede Parma. This is actually probably my favorite book on this subject, even though hedgeriding is only a part of what the book discusses. The only bad thing I can really say about this book is that it’s really not recommended for beginners, and it’s helpful to have the basics of visualization already mastered (for example) before doing the exercises Parma recommends.

By Land, Sky and Sea, by Gede Parma. This book goes into even greater details regarding different ways of conceptualizing the cosmology of hedgeriding, and I find it a very refreshing book that appreciatively draws from a number of different perspectives while grounding itself, so to speak, with the overarching metaphor of land, sky, and sea as the three worlds.

The Temple of Shamanic Witchcraft, by Christopher Penczak. Penczak is usually a pretty mixed bag, and this book is no exception. It gives a lot of good practical information and a very in-depth exploration of the three worlds (a useful concept), but it’s primarily framed by Wicca, so it might not resonate with those of other faiths and particularly those who aren’t pagan at all.

Ascension Magick, by Christopher Penczak. There’s a chapter or two in this that address alternate ways of conceptualizing the architecture of reality, and it’s pretty helpful for a hedgerider. Beyond that, this book is mostly about ceremonial magick, but it’s a (mostly) good book. Certain parts (such as the bit about UFOs) are a little off, in my opinion.

The Shamanic Witch, by Gail Wood. This book is really best suited for someone who practices Wicca and, besides the background info and cosmological descriptions, is really only useful in the context of that tradition. If you’re Wiccan or willing to pick around a lot of Wiccan-talk, though, this is a good foundation.

Witches, Werewolves and Fairies, by Claude Lecouteux. It can be hard to find scholarly works on these phenomena that are affordable, but here’s one I personally enjoyed. It details many accounts of journeying experienced by both pagans and Christians in earlier times, and gives a good description of the concept of the astral double, the architecture of the soul, and other topics throughout history.

Betwixt and Between, by Storm Faerywolf. This book is mostly a guide to the Feri tradition of witchcraft, but while I myself don’t practice that, those who do seem to know a lot about hedgeriding! The book has several chapters on the subject and is highly recommended for this reason.

The Psychic Energy Codex, by Michelle Belanger. A lot of people have strong opinions about this author, but this is book actually provides a lot of good information about so-called “energy work” which can be a step in the right direction for those wanting to ride the hedge.

Psychic Dreamwalking, by Michelle Belanger. In this book, Belanger discusses, essentially, how to use your non-waking life as a vehicle to for journeying, and while I myself don’t usually dreamwalk, much of what she says applies to hedgeriding in other states, too.

Hedge Riding and Hedge Witchcraft, by Harmonia Saille. I only mention these two in order to say that they’re best avoided. Saille tries to give a comprehensive look at the phenomenon, but it’s poorly-written and overly New Age. The negative reviews of them on Amazon really cover the problems with these book in more detail than I ever could.

Magical Writing, Words, and Symbols

Dictionary of Ancient Magic Words and Spells, by Claude Lecouteux. Mostly a historical text, this book isn’t exactly practical or terribly useful. It is, nevertheless, incredibly interesting. It’s a bit difficult to navigate, but worth a glance.

Composing Magick, by Elizabeth Barrette. A very general, but well-done, look at writing in a magical context. Some of the ritual templates are slightly specific to religious witchcraft traditions, but most information is widely applicable.

Crafting Magick with Pen and Ink, by Susan Pesnecker. Focuses both on the physical act of writing as a magical act, and the mental state associated with it. Highly recommended

The Modern Witchcraft Grimoire, by Skye Alexander. This book is for those who want to create their own grimoire. It gives fairly good advice for doing so, as well as providing hints and tricks for spellcasting and useful correspondences.

General Concepts

Planetary Magick, by Melita Denning and Osborne Phillips. If you want to work with the planets at all, particularly in a highly ritualized context, I recommend this book. It’s large, comprehensive and gives a good foundation beyond what you find in general astrology books.

Practical Planetary Magick, by Sorita d’Este and David Rankine. Shorter than I would have liked, but a useful reference to have on your shelf, with excellent tables and appendices in the back. The meditations are also quite useful.

Practical Elemental Magick, by Sorita d’Este and David Rankine. Should be read alongside the other book by this pair. Comprehensive guide to working with the elements in a ritualized fashion. Not as accessible to newbies as Lipp’s book, but good for seasoned practitioners.

The Way of Four, by Deborah Lipp. Though mostly geared towards Wiccans, I found this author’s in-depth treatment of the four elements highly fascinating. I will note that it’s probably best to get the print version of this book, as it contains exercises and quizzes.

Ingredients and Correspondences

The Herbal Alchemist’s Handbook, by Karen Harrison. I cannot praise this book enough for its concise and well-formulated approach to astrology, herbs, and magick as a whole.

The Weiser Concise Guide to Herbal Magick, by Judith Hawkins-Tillirson. This is excellent for anyone who’s interested in any kind of magick. Yes, the focus is generally herbs, but there’s a lot to be learned here about Kabbalah and other correspondence systems, as well.

Mixing Essential Oils for Magic, by Sandra Kynes. Fills a very difficult gap in published knowledge regarding the use of essential oils by discussing, in great detail, how scents interact with each other and how to create a formula that’s not only palatable, but evocative.

Dunwich’s Guide to Gemstone Sorcery, by Gerina Dunwich. Given the New Age fascination with all things shiny, it was quite a chore to sort through the myriad crystal books to find something with good information. While far from perfect and not exactly devoid of fluff, this book does give a level of detail about the lore surrounding gemstones not seen in many other texts.

Real Alchemy, by Robert Allen Bartlett. Excellent book, lots of history and detail. There’s a strong focus on tradition within the text, yet the author is quite accommodating of his audience and describes alternate methods that work better in a modern context.

Spagyrics, by Manfred M. Junius. With a highly-developed academic tone and attention to detail, this book is a meaty look at traditional alchemy. I recommend this more for intermediate practitioners due to the sheer density of information.

Spellbooks

The Goodly Spellbook, by Dixie Deerman and Steve Rasmussen. The title sounds horribly fluffy, but this is a hidden gem. It explains obscure concepts like alternative alphabets and potential uses of musical notes, as well as plant lore and other bits and pieces. Definitely worth checking out. It’s way more than just “a book of spells.”

Encyclopedia of 5,000 Spells, by Judika Illes. The title sounds trite to some, but it delivers. This book has spells from almost every culture and spiritual philosophy, as well as a very detailed formulary. I read it when I’m bored sometimes, too, just because I always learn some tidbit from it.

Book of Spells, by Nicola Pulford. In most editions, this book is absolutely gorgeous and describes spellcasting traditions from a variety of perspectives and traditions. Recommended for those who already understand the basics, as this book jumps straight into spellcasting and gives only a small amount of information about how things work.

Ceremonial Magick

Modern Magick, by Donald Michael Kraig. I received this as a gift several years ago. It is essentially a workbook meant to be completed slowly, step by step, and while the format will not appeal to everyone, it’s a good easy-to-read introduction to ceremonial magick.

Familiar Spirits, by Donald Tyson. Though geared towards ceremonialists, any practitioner can likely learn a thing or two from Tyson’s interesting stroll through the whys and wherefores of spirit work and thoughtform creation. This is by far the best book I’ve seen on the topic of familiar spirits.

Secrets of High Magick, by Francis Melville. The most recent edition of this (the one I own) is lavishly-illustrated and full of rudimentary, yet useful information. He stresses the basics of ceremonial practice, and his writing style is very accessible. Highly recommended for absolute beginners.

My Life With The Spirits, by Lon Milo DuQuette. This is a memoir of a ceremonial magician, but it gives a good look at the magickal mindset in a highly developed form from someone who’s experienced quite a lot. I have major issues with DuQuette’s approach to Qabalah, but his memoirs are worth a read.

Chaos Magick

Liber Null and Psychonaut, by Peter Carroll. Classic book of chaos magick. I consider it required reading for almost anyone interested in the occult. Even if you have no love for chaos magick, do give it a read, just to understand how influential Carroll is, and why.

Hands-On Chaos Magic, by Andrieh Vitimus. Knowing some of the people involved in the creation of this book, I’m a bit biased towards it. That said, even if I didn’t know them, I would still recommend it. It’s especially interesting to read alongside Liber Null and Psychonautin order to see how the chaos “current” has developed over the years.

Pop Culture Magic 2.0 by Taylor Ellwood. There aren’t a lot of books on using pop culture symbolism in magick, but this one is nearly perfect. The author writes in a highly erudite, literate fashion, while still being accessible to newbies. Many useful resources cited, as well, so prepare to branch off a bit while reading it.

History-Related

Triumph of the Moon, by Ronald Hutton. An inside no-holds-barred look at the history of Wicca and Modern paganism. Highly recommended. This is sort of the book that fluffbunnies don’t want you to read.

Book of Lies: The Disinformation Guide to Magick and the Occult, by Richard Metzger. Lots of facts and history of magick in the context of Postmodernity. This is different from the Crowley text of the same name, which I wouldn’t recommend unless you want to focus on his tradition.

The Place of Enchantment, by Alex Owen. This is a purely historical text that documents the occult revival within the context of Modernity. I remember it being very good, but please realize I haven’t really picked it up much since graduating, and it might just have served my mindset at the time.

Tarot

The Book of Thoth, by Aleister Crowley. Make sure you actually own (or have access to pictures of) the Thoth deck before you dive into this. By far one of the best books on Tarot ever published. The prose is often dense and purple, but in this one book, Crowley teaches so much about Tarot and it’s connection to the Western Mystery Tradition. I can’t really say much more - it must be experienced.

The Pictorial Key to the Tarot, by Arthur Edward Waite. I recommend this book because it is a classic and was introductory for many older readers. It will teach you to read and gives insight into the methodology behind the Waite-Smith deck specifically, particularly his use of what are essentially parables and why he does this. Do not expect too much esoteric information, but read it anyways.

Seventy-Eight Degrees of Wisdom, by Rachel Pollack. This is the epitome of a good modern Tarot book and is really one of the first ones I’d recommend for someone looking for an accessible book on Tarot in a modern context. Very dense in information and history, yet altogether worth it. You’ll want highlighters nearby for this one!

Tarot for a New Generation, by Janina Renée. This is essentially a book for children and teenagers, but I do recommend it for them, specifically, because it is well-written, easy to understand, and helpful to absolute beginners.

Secrets of the Waite-Smith Tarot, by Marcus Katz and Tali Goodwin. This book focuses just on the history, symbolism, and creative process of the Waite-Smith deck. It gives you an inside line on just what Pixie Smith was thinking when painting specific scenes, and is a great look at her life’s work, as well.

The Tarot: History, Symbolism, and Divination, by Robert M. Place. This book will not teach you to read Tarot, but does give an actual, accurate portrait of the history of the phenomena, which is incredibly important and useful. Know your history.

Understanding Aleister Crowley’s Thoth Tarot, by Lon Milo DuQuette. I hesitate to recommend DuQuette due to issues I have with his approach to Qabalah, but many people ask me for a beginner book for the Thoth Tarot specifically, and this is the closest I’ve come to finding one. I recommend reading this alongside, and not instead of, Crowley’s Book of Thoth.

The Back in Time Tarot, by Janet Boyer. This is more for the intermediate reader, and the entire book details a single, extremely useful technique for familiarizing yourself with the cards, namely by framing past events in terms of how they might appear in a spread.

Lenormand

The Essential Lenormand, by Rana George. This was not the first Lenormand book I picked up, but it was the most influential and intense. Ms. George writes in a personable, touching fashion and brings the concepts of the system home by relating them to life experiences in a way rarely seen. She is one of those authors I literally go all “fangirl” over.

Learning Lenormand, by Marcus Katz and Tali Goodwin. This is one of the better beginner books on Lenormand. I’m not going to lie - it isn’t as good as Rana George’s, but it definitely is worth reading if you’re completely new to the system. It’s very accessible, where some of the books I’ll be listing later in this can seem intimidating, or so I’ve been told.

Lenormand: Thirty-Six Cards, by Andy Boroveshengra. This book is intense, but in a different way than Ms. George’s. Expect to be inundated with information and techniques. Another one of those where you really need to take notes or highlight while reading, and read it multiple times.

Secrets of the Lenormand Oracle, by Sylvie Steinbach. This book is organized in a novel and useful fashion by topic, and gives specific techniques for readings on love, money, spirituality, and other topics. Highly recommended, and I tend to use it as a reference book nowadays, looking things up as needed.

The Complete Lenormand Oracle Handbook, by Caitlyn Matthews. Not for the beginner, nor the faint at heart, this one details a lot of what, to me, seem to be more advanced approaches and techniques. I use this book a lot, and I think anyone else will enjoy it, too. Good information on the connection between Lenormand and traditional playing cards, too.

Cartomancy with Lenormand and the Tarot, by Patrick Dunn. This is more of a special topic book, and best read after you’ve got some familiarity with both Tarot and Lenormand. It’s all about using them in tandem and the synergy between them.

Astrology

The Luminaries, by Liz Greene. I could really recommend anything by this author, but she’s written so much, and this book is a particularly important one. It focuses entirely on the Sun and Moon in astrology, and gives a good look at why the luminaries need to have a special place in your understanding.

The Weiser Concise Guide to Practical Astrology, by Priscilla Costello. This is focused, as you might expect, on actual interpretation of charts and less on theory, but it gives a good background on that, too. Was quite helpful in my attempts to interpret @xepsurah‘s unusual natal chart.

The Complete Book of Astrology, by Kris Brandt Riske. Very beginner, and very light on intellect, heavy on intuition. A great introduction, but I would not suggest it as the only book you read if you’re really interested in the subject.

Tasseography

Tea Leaf Reading for Beginners, by Caroline Dow. There are only a few books within Llewellyn’s immensely popular “For Beginners” series that I would recommend, and this is one of them. The symbol glossary (which makes up the bulk of the book) is the most useful part.

Tea Cup Reading, by Sasha Fenton. This book goes into some detail (quite a bit, actually) about the history of tea and coffee, and, better yet, how to prepare them in the traditional fashion! A lot of traditional lore is described, as well.

Scrying, etc.

Scrying for Beginners, by Donald Tyson. This is really a surprise find, as I don’t usually expect much from this series, by Tyson knows his history and goes far beyond simple exercises for scrying. He is a bit biased towards mirror and crystal-gazing techniques, but does discuss other methods.

Psychic Development for Beginners, by William Hewitt. Readable, and offers some very practical developmental exercises for those wishing to hone extrasensory abilities. Be prepared to sort through a lot of woo, though.

Who likes short stories?

I don’t feel like short stories get as much attention as novels. So, I thought it would be cool to have 31 short stories in 31 days in July that are freely accessible online to discuss and share faves. (Yeah, I know short story month was in May but I’m always a bit late for everything). 

Ideally it would be as high commitment as someone would want with daily stories and discussions about the stories. But at the same time laid back enough for people to join only on a couple of days who maybe want to read horror, or read after the ‘date’ of the discussion, or only have time to read a couple. 

I thought a set up like this:

Sundays: ?

Mondays:  Horror

Tuesdays: Contemporary

Wednesdays: ? 

Thursdays: Classic

Fridays: Fantasy

Saturdays: Science Fiction

might work. Don’t really know what to do with Sunday or Wednesday yet. I have some stories in mind but I’m open to suggestions. This is a very rough idea, but one I think would be neat to try. 

March 2017 Book Discussion Challenge, day 9

Guilty Pleasure

I was well into typing this post about my consumption of Sophie Kinsella books in my teens, when I realised two things:

First, it’s been years since I read those books, so they’re not really my guilty pleasure, or any kind of pleasure for that matter.

Second, I don’t think chick lit as a genre really needs any more hate, even if a good portion of these books perpetuate heteronormative gender roles and idealised fantasies of what romance is.

Consequently, my question is this: why should anything you read be considered a guilty pleasure? If you enjoy it, why should you feel guilty? And if you feel guilty for reading it, maybe you shouldn’t be reading it at all?

Trying to get my friend to read my favourite book so I can discuss it with them

Originally posted by kpfun

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-The Astro Witch Project-

  • Aquarius - Heart Witch: The most humanitarian of all witch types, they can easily adapt to the energy that surrounds them. A witch who uses her various abilities to help the world. Empathetic and Helpful. They are adept at spirit communication and are versed in the telepathy and healing. They enjoy wandering around, getting lost, meeting familiars and befriending creepy all types of individuals. Their craft is usually a mix of traditional witchcraft and meditation. They are very warm, hospitable individuals, but you should NEVER cross a Heart witch. They are not afraid to curse your ass. These witches favor the healing powers of love, enjoy mixing potions, reading next to a roaring fire and being surrounded by their friends and family. 
  • Pisces - Storm Witch: This breed of witch is both terrifying and thrilling. Compassionate yet fearful. They have a great sense of humor, and are usually very cryptic. They give zero fucks what people think of them and march to the beat of their own drum. Are usually very friendly, so they often find themselves in a company of very different people. Storm witches are selfless, they are always willing to help others, without hoping to get anything back.They whistle up the winds and summon lightning. Their overly trusting nature makes them an easy target for the ill-informed, but be careful, because these witches are very exceptional at cursing and fear nothing. They like horror movies, cloudy weather, and casting emotionally charged spells. They are empathetic individuals and always feel things to the extreme, there is often no middle ground with them. It’s black or white. 
  • Aries - Energy Witch: Witches that perform all of their magic internally. Their magic is one of pure energy that they pull from their courageous hearts. Using circles casts in their heads and their imaginations, they can bring their will to life. Are usually shy and keep to themselves. But they are also fiery and energetic. They enjoy divination and astral projection. Also called Intrinsic Witches. 
  • Taurus - Portal Witch: An undying need to always be surrounded by loved ones and hedonism, Portal witches possess superhuman agility and the ability to teleport with the aid of magical portals. This type of witch also uses easily obtained items and weaves magick into every aspect of their life. These witches have the ability to see things from a grounded, practical and realistic perspective.They are particularly fond of cooking, arts and crafts, sewing, cleaning, gardening and baking. They are skilled in potions, herbology, and subtle magick. Reliable and devoted, these witches are described as the original earth mothers.
  • Gemini - Shadow Witch: A witch that lives between two worlds. They easily cross over into The Fade, the shadowrealm, a dimension only accessible to these witches. They can be in both realms at once, or split from their shadows and be in one realm together. Very gentle and curious, they know how to fun with their abilities! Ever lose something 5 seconds after putting it down? That was probably a shadow witch joking around with you! Being in two places at once can be useful! Being in two places at once all the while undetected…dangerous! They are also clairvoyant and have a number of other psychic abilities. 
  • Cancer - Sea Witch: Highly imaginative and emotional! Loyal and sympathetic, these witches hone their craft near a body of water, and center their practice around it. Some sea witches will work with fresh water, such as rivers or lakes (in which case they will usually call themselves ‘river’ or ‘lake’ witches), some with the ocean. Sea witches without immediate access to a body of water are called ‘land-locked’, which can cause them to become a bit moody or pessimistic. They often form connections with fish of all kinds, know their local areas very well, are good at predicting the weather, and are friendly with the nymphs, fae and dragons of their region. They enjoy collecting sand and seashells and are adept at storm and sun magic.
  • Leo - Pop Culture Witch: A branch of Urban witchcraft. Witches that craft their spells based on popular music, movies, books and poetry. They are very adept at pyromancy (fire magic). These witches are very creative and passionate about everything that they do. Their mystical abilities are influenced by various aspects of their character. No pop culture witch is the same as another. They are artistic and very educated and love to laugh. Energetic and Dominant. Loyal, yet headstrong. Do not cross them. They can also curse the hell out of you. It’s not all Disney movies, folks. 
  • Virgo - Hedge Witch: A witch that can not only communicate with all wildlife, they can also share consciousness with them. Thier natural loyal and hardworking nature allow them to do so with ease. They can also manipulate the size of any creature, configuring its scale to accomplish any task! Though skilled at working with animals and magickal creatures, they can often struggle with opening up to others. They use their relationship with animals to accomplish unimaginable things. Often tender but also very careful, they are very organised and practical about their craft.These witches are also very adept at spirit communication, energy work, and levitation. Also called Omega Witches. 
  • Libra - Urban Witch: Fair-minded and peaceful, these witches have an expressed intellect and a keen mind. They can be inspired by good books, insurmountable discussions and interesting people. City witches who graffiti sigils on abandoned buildings, grow herbs in pots in their apartments and are very technologically savvy. Technomagic is their jam, usually rocking enchanted headphones, weaving spells from their favorite songs and using their cell phones as scrying mirrors. 
  • Scorpio - Spirit Witch: Mysterious and seductive, Spirit witches are one of a kind. A witch who communes with the dead spirits of humans, animals, and others entities. Some can even communicate with the spirits of trees, rocks, and man-made items. They are usually very outspoken, opinionated people, though only show their full force when completely necessary. They use spirit boards and pendulums, among many other tools. They enjoy taking strolls in graveyards and having casual chats with the dead. Also called Mediums. 
  • Sagittarius - Moon Witch: A witch whos abilities change depending on the phases of the moon. The full extent of their power being at full potential during the full moon. They are particularly fond of comedy shows, group activities, spell crafting with fellow witches, and collecting. They are very skilled in herbology and dark magick. Generous and idealistic, these witches incorporate magic into their optimistic goals. These witches know how to transform their thoughts into concrete actions and they will do anything to achieve their goals. Also called Lunar Witches. 
  • Capricorn - Chaos Witch: A witch who uses baneful magick in their craft. They will sometimes use demons, storm magick, blood magick, and cursing in their practice. They fear nothing. Commonly mislabeled ‘black’ or ‘dark’ witch. Which is not correct. Tsk tsk. These witches are responsible, disciplined, have more self-control than most, and are very good managers. They pull most of their power from their love of family and tradition. Their powers are very practical and are considered to be the most serious of the witch community.

Inspired by this post

Mentors

How much do we know about the mentors from the other districts?  Peeta and Katniss are stuck with Haymitch because he’s the only living Victor from District 12, but what about the other tributes?  It’s hard for me to believe that Haymitch would’ve been able to convince the Career mentors to allow Peeta into the Career pack if he didn’t already have some sort of relationship with them.  I’m assuming that the Career districts would have their fair share of Victors, so how do they choose who gets to mentor the current years’ tributes?  Do they have separate “pretty” mentors, meaning the ones like Finnick who are expected to act like escorts, and then other mentors who are more strategic, and therefore better at the actual mentoring (securing sponsors, etc)?  This seems plausible, especially in the Career districts.  But then again, Katniss seems to recognize Finnick during the Quarter Quell reapings, so maybe Finnick was both the pretty mentor and the strategic one.  And, Haymitch seems to know every single Quell tribute, indicating that he’d at least seen them mentoring during other games over his 24 years as a Victor.


Anyone else have any thoughts?

D23 Expo will bring Alex Hirsh And Daron Nefcy

  • On Friday July 14 at 10:30 AM in the D23 Expo Arena,Gravity Falls creator Alex Hirsch and Star Vs The Forces Of Evil creator Daron Nefcy will discuss how to bring hit Disney XD series to the screen to the amazing world of books discussing Journal 3 and Star and Marco’s Guide to Mastering Every Dimension
Hey! Let's recommend some books :)

Yesterday I started and finished reading “All the bright places” by Jennifer Niven. What a beautiful and painful book! I think it’s the best contemporary book I’ve read this year along with “Eleanor & Park” by Rainbow Rowell. What’s the best contemporary book/s you have read in 2017? Reblog and tell me! I just want to read more contemporary books.

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When WOMEN WHO RUN WITH THE WOLVES was first published in 1993, it created a furor about the idea of the Wild Woman archetype and how women had lost our connection to our natural, instinctual selves. Jungian psychoanalyst, poet, and keeper of old stories Clarissa Pinkola Estes’ book went to sell over 2 million copies, but today her fascinating book is rarely discussed. Estes’ ideas are both ancient and completely new. She points to storytelling, our ancient narratives, as a way for women to reconnect to the Wild Woman all women have within themselves, but have lost.

Emma x

Chapter 8

I had forgotten until this reread that Gale wasn’t a bow hunter until he met Katniss.  He was relying only on his snares to catch enough food for his family before they met.  Katniss says, “as the seasons went by, we grudgingly began to share our knowledge our weapons, our secret places…”  Seasons, implying that it was several months before she felt him trustworthy enough to give him one of her precious bows, and at least as long for her to return his smiles.  Her trust in others up to that point had been shattered with the passing of her father and the immobility of her mother, perhaps only softened a tiny bit when Peeta threw her the bread.

She goes on to talk about how she and Gale traded with each other.  He taught her snares and fishing while she taught him about plants and how to shoot.  About how she grew to enjoy his companionship while in the woods, how he became her confidant.  Over a five-year period of time she grew to trust him.  She compares how she feels with Gale in the woods to the friendship she’s pretending to have with Peeta during training, where she feels like she has to doubt Peeta’s motives because she assumes that he’s trying to win, just like she is, and his winning would mean her death.

The chapter ends with Haymitch dropping the bombshell about Peeta wanting to be coached separately for their interviews.  “Haymitch shrugs.” when he tells her.  He shrugs, like it shouldn’t be a big deal.  But, as we find out right away in the next chapter, (I peeked, I couldn’t help it!) it is a big deal to Katniss.  Since this is a reread, I can understand why Peeta would want to have his interview coaching done separately from Katniss, but it hits Katniss hard.  Much harder than she expects it should I think.

Microreview: TBR

To play: answer the prompts and tag your friends to do the same. Optional: use #microreview and check out @microreviews for “rules,” reviews, and more!

Pick a book you own but haven’t read yet: 
The Sun is also a Star by Nicola Yoon

How did you come by it? Given by a friend? Bought from a recommendation? Compelled by the cover?
This was on my wishlist, and I received it for a gift. I read Everything, Everything, but wasn’t a huge fan. I heard that this book was far better, apparently there’s science talk, and look at the cover:

Quote the first sentence(s):
”Local Teen Accepts Destiny, Agrees to Become Doctor, Stereotype.”

Realistically, will you ever read it?
I will. I’ve been reading a lot of fantasy lately, and this seems like it will be a nice, fun break from that. 

Tagging (no pressure, only fun): @24zallurabbits, @monsieurbookshire, @symonereads, @coffeebooksorme, @kitcatbookmad