book throwing

Each of them had something...

Molly noticed it a lot in the weeks following. It started with Ginny and a note left for Molly when she came back from town one afternoon.

“Hey mum, gone down the road to play some Quidditch, be back by dinner. Love Ginny” 

It was in the Gs and the way she wrote Mum specifically but seeing the handwriting put a lump in her throat and burning tears in her eyes.

The next was Ron, he was home studying for his Auror training and he was having a hard time. She heard him stomping and throwing his book against the wall and the sound made her dizzy.

A little later Percy would come home for a visit and when he walked through the door with a “mornin’ mum” she felt her legs buckle below her and she needed to lean on the table to stay upright.

Then a package came from Charlie, inside was a picture of him with a new dragon and the way the light struck his eyes made her gasp for air and hold her chest.

Bill came by the house one evening and kicked his boots off by the door, spreading dirt all over the hall and when she walked through the door she almost cursed HIM and when the words were in her throat she realized whos boots they were, the words caught in her throat and she dropped the bags she had been carrying. 

The worst of all was about a month and a half later, the first time George joined them for a real meal. She walked into the kitchen and saw him sitting at the table from behind and leaving the room sunk to the floor in the hallway crying.

Ginny had Fred’s handwriting.

Ron had Fred’s temper.

Percy had Fred’s voice and enunciation.

Charlie had Fred’s eyes.

Bill had Fred’s mannerisms.

George had Fred.

I find beauty in old piano keys and fraying guitar strings; I find beauty in lonely forests and dark caves, in abandoned bookstores and dusty libraries; I find beauty in music that means something and in people who are passionate. I find beauty in things that make time stop for just a second.
—  The World Moves Too Fast Sometimes

malec-go-to-hogwarts  asked:

hi cassie :) i've been a fan of the books since 2010 and it's been amazing to see how much they've grown in terms of popularity and audience. I would love to know whether you came up with the idea to write the eldest curses because of how popular Magnus became and the reaction to him or was the idea in your head from the beginning and you decided to finally write it :) also could i be cheeky and ask for a snippet from the lost book of the white preferably featuring Alec....

I was excited to write the story of Magnus and Alec Having An Adventure and Falling More In Love for a very long time, but my ability to do so was limited by the way publishing and distribution worked back in 2005, when I was initially trying to sell City of Bones. There was a lot more resistance to gay characters in YA at that time. A couple of publishers turned the book down because Alec, a gay character, was in it. The Barnes & Noble website page for City of Bones included a review from Commonsense Media where they gave it a content warning for “sexual content” just because of the presence of a gay character even though he never did anything sexual. A lot of big box stores refused to carry the book, and major children’s book clubs passed it over. 


I always hoped for systems to change. As the books grew more popular, and as times changed, I was able to include more of Magnus and Alec as the series went on. In fact, their presence in the story and on the page made a big jump starting in CoFA, at which point I received a surge of criticism from those who were upset that I was writing about Magnus and Alec more prominently. I remember having my books pulled from libraries; foreign translators cut scenes with Magnus and Alec in them; once I was standing in the middle of the street about to get into a car to take me to a school where I was going to do a talk about my books when my publicist came up and said we were no longer invited: the school had read about Magnus and Alec and they didn’t want me there. Or often, if I was at a school, I’d be asked not to talk about Magnus and Alec while speaking to the students.


I tried to walk a careful line, including Magnus and Alec (and later, Aline and Helen) as significant and meaningful characters, but still managing to keep schools, libraries, and reading groups from throwing the books out or locking them up where the kids who most needed to read them wouldn’t be able to access them at all.


I held onto the hope that attitudes would continue to shift, to allow for more freedom to write characters who accurately represent the population of the world we live in (and represent my own friends and family, on whom Alec and Helen specifically are based). Hope that I’d be able to expand roles for characters like Magnus and Alec, and over the past twelve years — partly as I’ve carved out my career in a way where I can take the sales hits that sometimes result from major LGBT+ inclusion, and partly because of so many brave writers, readers, editors and publishers who’ve pushed for change — I’ve been able to do so more and more. 


When I was writing CoFA, I purposefully left a gap where Magnus and Alec go on vacation, with the idea that someday I could go back and fill in that gap with a story focused on them. For a long time that wasn’t something that companies wanted to buy and publish. I could have self-published the series, but I wanted the books on the shelves in stores, on the “bestsellers” rack with every other book I’ve written, making a statement about how much people want this kind of book and these kind of characters. I chose to write the story now when I did because Simon and Schuster, my publisher, opened Saga Press, an imprint dedicated to expanding what you can do in YA and cross-publishing with adult fantasy/sci fi. It’s Saga that will be publishing The Eldest Curses.

I thought a lot about what to say here because of two things: one, that people don’t like to hear about pushback against writing non-straight characters — it’s depressing (it is), it seems distant, unreal, how can these old systems and thought processes still exist? We’ve had successful books with gay characters in them! We’re done, right? I guess all I can say is that I think there’s a value to illuminating the pushback because it underlines how important it is to keep supporting books with LGBT+ characters because we are not there yet; we’re not where those books are give the same budgets and marketing and push as books with straight casts, and it takes the support of readers and reviewers and bookstore and library buyers to get us there.

I’d also say that I know I’ll get criticism for saying I was careful in my portrayal of Magnus and Alec until I felt like I’d gotten to a place where even if the fact that they were in love, lived together, even had sex was shown or even just implied (as it is in CoFA) it wouldn’t mean the books were locked up in libraries and slapped with warning labels. I guess I can only say it’s hard to navigate a situation where you fear the very kids who need to read about Magnus and Alec won’t be able to. When you meet kids who say “This book saved my life” so many times, and you think “But what if you couldn’t get to it? What if your school wouldn’t carry it, or your library, or your Walmart, which in small towns is sometimes literally the only source of books?) I accept that criticism. We all face hard choices in life and we make complicated decisions we think are for the best, and being criticized for those decisions is part of living and learning.

I guess the only other thing I’d say is whatever shitty things were said to me over the years about Magnus and Alec, they pale in comparison to the shitty things said to writers like Malinda Lo and Scott Tracey who were writing their own lives and experiences in the form of LGB characters on the page — and as Malinda says, their pain at confronting homophobia/biphobia will always be more visceral and personal than mine.

If you go out and buy The Lost Book of the White of course I’ll be thrilled, and a lot of that will be because it’s a way to show publishers that this kind of media and these protagonists are wanted and desired by readers. But I’d be just as thrilled if you picked up any fantasy by an LGB+ writer with LBG+ characters in it. There’s a ton of wonderful stuff and I hope you’ll explore it.

I am so angry that I could THROW this book across the room but I am NOT GOING TO instead I will CAREFULLY PLACE it in its spot on my METICULOUSLY ORGANISED bookshelf

Ooh Varian
  • Rhysand: there are two conditions: you are not to take either sister, and you are not to enter their floor. If you require a book from the library, you will ask the servants. If you wish to speak to Elain or Nesta, you will also ask the servants, who will ask us. If you disregard those rules, I’ll lock you in a room with Amren.
  • Lucein: *shudders in fear* *nods in agreement*
  • Varian: *appears out of nowhere*
  • Varian: * sets nesta's books on fire
  • Varian: *throws Elain out of the window*
  • Varian: Oooh no I broke the rules! I await my punishment

zaynmalickmedown  asked:

So would it be correct to assume Mark will be on the cover for QoAaD? ALSO, did you write Emma and Julian as kind of flips on kinda sexist male and female character stereotypes on purpose? Like how Emma takes on what are generally thought of as more masculine character traits (brash, impulsive, headstrong, more prone to violence) while Julian, besides being a caregiver, relies more heavily on what Cersei Lannister would call 'women's weapons'; his wits and and ability to manipulate others.

I love this question because yes, definitely! Julian and Emma are meant to be exactly that. Julian is the one who holds the babies, makes the pancakes, has the traditional “caretaking” role; Emma is the one who’s out hitting things with her sword first and asking questions later. Of course they’re both more layered than that — Emma has plenty of caregiving instincts and Julian is a more than competent fighter — because essentially those stereotypes break down in the face of individuality, even when you flip them. But it was a lot of fun to play around with them: that is in fact the reason Emma is the one who has sexual experience and isn’t a virgin their first time; Julian is. It’s maybe the thing about flipping the stereotypes I get the most questions about: the idea of alpha masculinity and sexual aptitude in men being tied to experience (often with a string of nameless partners they didn’t care about) while the girl is an inexperienced and shrinking flower is so ingrained in us as the pinnacle of romance I think Julian’s virginity in the first book really throws people for a loop. I actually had a lot of fun writing the “extended” cottage scene in LoS from his perspective because we get to see what he thinks about the scene in LM having been his first time and what it means for him and whether he cares that Emma is more sexually experienced than he is (no.)

(I also like that quote from Cersei, thanks for that, because it’s true that manipulation is seen as a woman’s weapon but strategy is a man’s game. And yet they’re basically the same thing. It’s often about specificity of language and how certain words are feminized. Meanwhile I bet Julian and Cersei would have a killer game of chess.)

  • Robin, actual cinnamon roll with no anger: *gets mad at trig homework and throws book against wall*
  • Joker: holy shit Brucie he takes after me
  • Bruce: he's not your son. He's not my son either. He's adopted.
  • Joker: *gasp*
  • Robin: *gasp* I am /too/ your son
  • Joker: Yeah Bats. He's our son.
  • Batman: oh my god stop saying our why are you even in my house
Improper Evangelizing

Long context: In a 5e game, we’re being pursued on a carriage by a group of Fell bats in the middle of an undead siege on the city. The party has whittled it down to the last bat.

Our Paladin is the son of Bahamut, and must spread his religion to prove his worth to his father. To do this, a book has been created, and our Paladin wears a robe that will magically conjure one of the books every time he reaches into it and says the phrase, “Have I got a book for you!”

DM: The last Bat is still pursuing you. [Paladin], you’re up.

Paladin: Well, I don’t want to hold action again since my breath weapon is out. I’m going to try to evangelize the bat to my religion!

DM: It doesn’t understand common.

Paladin: Shit. Well, I guess I can throw a book at it.

*A moment of stunned silence as we all take in what he just suggested*

DM: (attempting to suppress his giggling) Okay. Roll a strength improvised weapon throw.

Paladin: I got… a 21 total.

DM: (giggling maniacally) That hits! Roll damage.

Paladin: 11.

DM: (trying not to laugh hysterically) You hear the voice of your father in your head, whispering “Use the book…”

Paladin: (dramatically) I reach into my robes, and shout the phrase “Have I got a book for you!”, and on ‘you’, I frisbee the book as hard as I can!

DM: The book has a beautiful curve to it, arcing gracefully through the rain, water cascading from its’ spinning surface. You watch as it moves and intercepts the bat, perfectly hitting it in the face, crushing its’ skull and killing it instantly.

Party: *bursts out into hysterical laughter*

Fighter: (me, imitating the DM’s Bahamut voice) [Paladin], you idiot! That’s not how you evangelize!

Paladin: (laughing and fighting back tears) I just wanted you to be proud of me!

Needless to say, our Paladin used his book to successfully convert many that night.

me, signing up for a course on Early Celtic legends: Oh Boy I Can’t Wait To Learn Everything This Class Has To Offer And Expand My Knowledge And Write About The Many Fascinating Attributes Of This Culture!!!

also me, 11pm on the night before the paper is due, looking at a blank document: fuck the early irish and their satanic love of Lists