book math

A miraculous library is completely filled with books about magic, ghosts, dragons, etc. In the lowest corner of the farthest shelf, you discover a weather-beaten book entitled “Math”.

Where Genius Waits:

Aries: In the frenzy of moments of inspiration, in their childful dreams, in the boldness with which they live.

Taurus: In their gifting of goods, in their material creations, in their slow but steady methods.

Gemini: In the teachings they pass on, in the tales they spin, in the jokes they tell.

Cancer: In the lullabies they comfort with, in the homes they create, in the lunar madness of their dreams.

Leo: In their dances of theatricality, in the power of self-belief, in their creative bursts.

Virgo: In their understanding of the power of the small things, in their intricate minds, in looking out beyond themselves.

Libra: In their interest in connection, in their mediating minds, in the conversations that flow like poetry.

Scorpio: In the depths that they dive, in the tenacity of their will, in the rawness of their creations.

Sagittarius: In their cackling humour, in their gathering of luck, in their curious yet sceptical minds.

Capricorn: In their method and timing, in their sights set high, in their practical footsteps.

Aquarius: In their inventive eccentricities, in their innovative thoughts, in their objective humanitarianism.

Pisces: In their daydream days, in their doodling on maths books, in their channelling of source.

I like to think that Keith kept sneaking into the Garrison to collect info, steal food,supplies etc and became a sort of a myth after some students spotted him during one of these trips. So the new Garrison meme is blaming Keith for everything

“ have you seen my maths book? I can’t find it.”.

“maybe Kogane took it”

“I failed my test, I think Kogane cursed me :/”

“The cafeteria ran out of tater tots before I could get any! Screw you Kogane!”

Keith Kogane, the Garrison cryptid

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Top left photo courtesy Lee Towndrow/Little, Brown and Company

On his first day in the seventh grade, Sherman Alexie opened up his school-assigned math book and found his mother’s maiden name written in it. “I was looking at a 30-year-old math book,” he says — and that was the moment he knew that he needed to leave his home.

Alexie grew up on the Spokane Indian Reservation in the state of Washington. His mother was one of the few people who could still speak the native language, but she didn’t teach it to him. In his new memoir, You Don’t Have to Say You Love Me, he describes growing up surrounded by poverty, alcoholism and violence.

Check out his conversation with Fresh Air’s Terry Gross here.

– Petra