book cover from a vintage painting

10

ᴮᴸᴬᶜᴷ ᴮᴼᴼᴷ ᴺᴼ. 2

This is the second in a series of six handmade art books made by me between October 2015 and March 2016. One black book was produced per month. Each book contains my handmade paper, vintage pages from upcycled books and magazines, original black and white photography, original handwritten poetry in six lines, and original paintings. Each book has been hand bound and possesses a unique black cover. I gave myself strict guidelines in regards to concept, style and time. But, allowed for experimentation since I am somewhat new to the art of bookmaking. The perfect book is still a ways away.

The black books are my intimate meditations on loss and grief. I intend to continue creating handmade art books, but hopefully move beyond grief as a subject. This is some of what I have been working on while offline. I hope you will appreciate this glimpse into my books and I look forward to hearing any feedback you might have. I will show the third book next week.

ᴷᴷᴼᴹᴾᴾᴬ

©wнereneѕѕ16

2

WHERE I’M READING FROM - Tim Parks

Should you finish every book you start?

What is literary style?

Do we need stories?

In this collection of lively and provocative pieces Tim Parks talks about what readers want from books and how to look at the literature we encounter in a new light.

When working on ideas for the cover we wanted to portray the joy of books. We painted, drew and took photos of different jackets before choosing the above ‘flying books’ illustration for the cover. The illustration works its way across the entire jacket, even making an appearance on the endpapers where we experimented with a different view focusing more on the pages within. Together they help celebrate the ever changing world of books.

Out now from Harvill Secker.

♡ november artist profile: jessica woods ♡ 

jessica is a photographer from ontario, canada exploring a variety of themes in her work including childhood, coming of age & the idea of “home.” (photo blog)

how did you get started in film? 
i was always a creative child and was encouraged to express myself through various art forms from a very young age. i loved to draw and paint, but nothing truly “clicked” with me until i discovered photography. when i was around 16 i purchased my first film slr (that i still use faithfully to this day) and learned to develop my own film and prints in the darkroom.

what is your favorite thing to shoot?
i like to shoot around the places where i grew up. i want to capture certain emotions, if it feels like heavy fog in autumn, the woods at night where creatures and ghosts hide in trees and in holes in the ground, like a place i knew as a child, a dream or a memory, a visual or auditory distortion caused by fear or love or sleeplessness, an abandoned house where the memories of previous owners still haunt the walls, like shivering when you’re outside and it’s cold but you’re holding hands with the person you love, if it feels like something lurking in the shadows, a dimly lit street in my hometown, the forest after it rains.

what was your first subject and what is your latest subject?
my first subject was probably myself, more out of necessity than anything else. i wasn’t really comfortable shooting others but soon found i could express more of what i wanted to anyway through self-portraiture. my latest subject as i am writing this is the beach town where i am staying, we have a little house by the water here that i like to go to when i have free weekends. there are a lot of weird motels and shops here that are fun to poke around in. about a month ago i found a compound of abandoned cottages right on the beach!

who are your favorite film photographers?
here are so many amazing photographers, artists and artwork that have become accessible thanks to the internet, i feel as though i am discovering beautiful work all the time. some photographers i have admired for a long time include allison scarpulla, aëla labbé and francesca woodman.

when you’re not shooting film, what are you up to?
i’ve got a few projects lined up this winter! first and foremost i’ve been working on a photo book that i hope to release sometime in the early new year that will contain a selection of my work from 2013 to 2014. second, i will be shooting the cover and album artwork as well as a music video for a wonderful local artist, the latter which will be my first foray into filmmaking, so that’s really exciting. in my spare time i also run a shop where i sell secondhand and vintage clothing, i draw, paint and write, travel, spend time with my friends and loved ones, and i have a job i love at a little library in my town.

I’ve seen the paths that your eyes wander down

A coffee shop/college AU
for thewriterchick

….

The coffee shop is not a place Darcy would have normally worked, if she had the choice and didn’t desperately need the money.  The place was too full of hipsters and students for her liking, even though she was one of them. She loves working there anyway.

Mismatched wooden tables and chairs vied with three ancient couches for floorspace. The couches were her favorite despite the possibility of sinking into them and never climbing out of again. Behind the counter, the wall was covered in chalkboard paint, her boss’ relatively legible handwriting and Darcy’s own geometric doodles.

One wall of the cafe is papered in pages from a vintage astronomy book, with a single ornately framed reproduction star chart. The Star Huntress was the sort of place you wanted to curl up in and spend a day, or two reading one of the books stacked haphazardly in the bookcase covered back wall, or while away the hours using the free wifi. Today’s password was adalovelace’, yesterday’s was murielwheldaleonslow’.

The bell on the door jingles merrily and two boys shuffle in. The blonde is sporting a bloody lip and a swollen eye, the one with the dark hair is wiping a drop of blood from his nose with a bit of tissue, a smirk plastered across his face.

“Ten minutes till closing, guys,” Darcy says, barely looking up from her notebook. What she should be doing is working on her paper on animal stories for her mythology course. What she was actually doing was drawing a butterfly over her notes while she hummed along to the radio. What she was being paid to do was to make coffee and glower at her fellow students, something she excelled at if you asked her. Most people rarely did.

“We can go somewhere else, Bucky,” says the blonde, breathing raggedly.

“Girl said ten minutes,” Bucky grins, shoving the crumpled tissue into his pocket. “Two lattes and whatever cake you’ve got left, sweetheart.”

“Jerk,” mutters the blonde sticking his hands into the pockets of his jacket and pulling out an inhaler, giving it a quick shake before taking a puff.

“Watch the name callin’, I’m not the asshole that started a bar fight,” Bucky grins, wide and reckless.

Darcy narrows her eyes, tilting her her head to the side, “Weren’t you two in here the other day? Art student, Mercuriade sandwich with extra cheese and latte bowl? Steve, right?”

“Uh, yeah, that was me,” Steve says, reaching his hand up to run through his messy hair. He winces and shakes his hand out. The knuckles of both hands are red and swollen.

“Idiot.”

“And you,” she said pointing at Bucky, “Raspberry mocha, struck out with the redhead with the iced brownie latte with whip, no sprinkles, right?”

“No,” Bucky scowls.

“I don’t forget orders,” Darcy says, which isn’t even really true, but it’s close enough. “You can argue with me but it won’t get you cake.”

“S’fine,” Bucky says, holding up his hands in mock surrender. Steve bursts out laughing clutching at his chest with his right hand. “Knock it off.” Bucky elbows Steve in the side  and pulls a wallet out of the back pocket of his jeans.

“Eight-fifty.”

“keep the change,” Bucky says, handing over a ten dollar bill.

So, tell me about this bar fight?” Darcy asks, plating up the last two slices of chocolate cake and setting the on the counter. She glances out the window but the street is empty in the halo of light from the nearest streetlight.

“Nothin’ to do with me, sweetheart, ask the idiot with the fat lip,”  Bucky shrugs, leaning casually against the countertop. Darcy looks between Steve and Bucky and back again.

Steve looks at her with wide blue eyes, eyebrows raised in  the picture of angelic innocence. Or it would have been if his eyes didn’t skate off to the right and the left corner of his mouth didn’t tick up. He winces and presses the pads of his fingers below the swelling of his lip, the movement shifts the sleeve of his t-shirt and she is given a tantalising glimpse of ink on his upper arm.

“A girl at the bar said no and some fuck had less sense that a damn dog,” Steve says, eyes bright and defiant.

“Did your Lois thank you for your amature heroics?”

“Uh, we didn’t really hang around to see,” Steve says sheepishly.

“What loverboy means is we got thrown out on our asses first,” Bucky says, pinching a bit of cake off one of the plates and popping it into his mouth.

“Yeah, that too,” Steve mutters, the tips of his ears turning red. “I didn’t catch your name,” Steve says, and Darcy snorts, and jerks her head to the little gold framed chalkboard perched on the counter. ‘Today your Barista is: Darcy. Be nice, because she won’t be.’  is scrawled in blue chalk with an angry face with jagged teeth doodled in the bottom left corner. “Darcy.”

“That’s me.”

“So, how’d you know I was an arts major?”

“You had oil paint on your shirt, and spent two hours sketching before your friend walked in,” Darcy says, focusing on pulling shot after shot of espresso. She can feel both of them watching her and rolls her lips between her teeth, willing her face not to turn red. “S’my job,” she shrugs, and sets their lattes down on the counter.

10

ᴮᴸᴬᶜᴷ ᴮᴼᴼᴷ

This is the first in a series of six handmade art books made by me between October 2015 and March 2016. One black book was produced per month. Each book contains my handmade paper, vintage pages from upcycled books and magazines, original black and white photography, original handwritten poetry in six lines, and original paintings. Each book has been hand bound and possesses a unique black cover. I gave myself strict guidelines in regards to concept, style and time. But, allowed for experimentation since I am somewhat new to the art of bookmaking. The perfect book is still a ways away.

The black books are my intimate meditations on loss and grief. I intend to continue creating handmade art books, but hopefully move beyond grief as a subject. This is some of what I have been working on while offline. I hope you will appreciate this glimpse into my books and I look forward to hearing any feedback you might have. I will show the second book next week.

ᴷᴷᴼᴹᴾᴾᴬ

©wнereneѕѕ16

9

The Thing The Book goes meta as it examines what makes a book a book

The Thing The Book: A Monument to the Book as Object
by John Herschend and Will Rogan
Chronicle Books
2014, 156 pages, 8.4 x 10.4 x 0.9 inches
$28 Buy a copy on Amazon

WINK is a site that’s dedicated to the unique and glorious qualities of the print book. Similarly, The Thing The Book celebrates all aspects of this amazing medium that revolutionized the world. Created by John Herschend and Will Rogan, the Bay Area artists behind one of my favorite subscription-based art projects, The Thing Quarterly, The Thing The Book gathers together over 30 well-known writers, artists, photographers, and thinkers, and asks them to riff on some traditional element of the book: cover, bookplate, table of contents, footnotes, endnotes, index, endpapers, etc.

The result is a collaborative art piece in book form, brilliant at times, mysterious and intriguing at others, and sometimes just plain odd and inexplicable. See celebrated author Jonathan Lethem’s single footnote, performance artist Miranda July’s tipped-in purple erratum, artist Dave Muller’s adorable flip book dancers (featuring Thom Yorke from the “Lotus Flower” video), filmmaker Mike Dion’s gallery of vintage book covers, and conceptual artist Lawrence Weiner’s ponderous thumb tab. 

Essayists include art and music writer Andrew Hultkrans (on the dying book), artist and geographer Trevor Paglen (on the lonely painting of Lascaux), and artist Lucy Pullen (on story telling). Lest one forget that this book really is a celebration of the book as an object, a thing, the promotional video for it shows it being used to prop open windows, as a food serving tray, as a sleep mask, etc.  – Gareth Branwyn

January 14, 2015