book as object

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Surreal Book and Lamp Installations by Rune Guneriussen Illuminate Norway’s Forests

Norwegian artist Rune Guneriussen moves elements of domestic life into the outdoors, producing large installations built from books, lamps, and other displaced objects. His works are placed in remote areas of Norway’s forest, and either balance precariously in a selected location or illuminate a particular patch of the surrounding wooded environment. “It is not as much photography as it is about sculpture and installation,” says Guneriussen in an artist statement. “…This process involves the object, story, space and most important the time it is made within. It is an approach to the balance between nature and human culture, and all the sublevels of our own existence.”

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I’ve grown quite weary of the spunky heroines, brave rape victims, soul-searching fashionistas that stock so many books. I particularly mourn the lack of female villains — good, potent female villains. Not ill-tempered women who scheme about landing good men and better shoes (as if we had nothing more interesting to war over), not chilly WASP mothers (emotionally distant isn’t necessarily evil), not soapy vixens (merely bitchy doesn’t qualify either). I’m talking violent, wicked women. Scary women. Don’t tell me you don’t know some. The point is, women have spent so many years girl-powering ourselves - to the point of almost parodic encouragement - we’ve left no room to acknowledge our dark side. Dark sides are important. - Gillian Flynn

Enchanting a pendant to show someone's true self

Very straight forward. This is a spell to enchant a pendant so that the person wearing it will reveal their true inner self (thoughts/actions) to others.

Things needed:

•Black candle
•Pendant
•Intentions written on paper (in your own words) 
•Black string
•Box to put pendant in (cleansed)
•Scissors or something that can cut string

Directions:

**Cleanse pendant and box before or during ritual

1.Cast a circle 

2. Cleanse pendant and box if needed

3.Light candle

4. Read intentions from paper while dripping candel wax on paper 

5.Start chant

6.while chanting wrap the black string around paper with wax (not cooled completely) and pendant to bind your intentions to the pendant

7. When you feel like it is bound completely place the pendant in the box

8. blow out candle and close circle

9. Leave pendant in box for a week or longer 

10. When you are ready to give it to someone or wear it cut the sting and take the string and paper off. By now the intentions would be soaked into pendant and the string and paper can be discarded 


Chant:

The wearer of this pendant could be most divine

Or the wearer could be serpentine 

Either way it’s not left to chance

The wearers inner self is out to dance

Others will see your true form bloom

There is no hiding behind your costume 

When the traits are to be admire

Other can show their desire

When the traits are that of detest

Others around will not be impressed

There it is and there it shall be 

Let the true self come out of thee

anonymous asked:

Can you write a post explaining German cases please?

If they could be explained in one post, i’m sure we’d all have less problems lmao but i’ll try! 

1. What cases are there? 

German has four cases: Nominativ, Genitiv, Dativ und Akkusativ. (for any Latin nerds: Same as in Latin minus Ablative and Vocative.) 

2. Why are they necessary? 

Well, for once, you’ll need them if you want native speakers to understand what you’re saying. But let’s go a little deeper and compare German to English: 

In English, the meaning depends on the sentence structure. “The man bit the dog” and “The dog bit the man” have very different meanings even though both sentences use the same words - that’s because of the typical SVO-order. In English, the subject generally comes first, then some kind of verb, then the object (there are more difficult cases of course, but let’s not go into that rn). English has very little morphology, meaning that nouns/pronouns/determiners don’t inflect (a lot) depending on the case they’re in. 

In German, you can switch stuff around until you’re dizzy. “Der Hund biss den Mann” and “Den Mann biss der Hund” both mean the same, because “den” indicates that “Mann” is in the Akkusativ, thus he’s the one being bitten, no matter where you put him in the sentence. The case morphology allows a freer sentence order without leading to possible misunderstandings. 

3. So how do I know which case I need? 

This is the moment where it gets more complicated. You can associate the following questions with each case: 

  • Nominativ = Wer oder was? (Who?. The subject of a sentence is always in the nominative case.)
  • Genitiv = Wessen? (Whose?. Typically describes possession or comes as a rule after certain prepositions like “wegen” or verbs like “gedenken”.)

Okay, we can deal with that. Now on to the more difficult stuff: 

  • Dativ = Wem? 
  • Akkusativ = Wen oder was? 

To understand this, some knowledge of grammar is definitely an advantage. Consider the following sentences: 

  • I have a book. = Ich habe ein Buch. 
  • This is all well and nice. Subject (NOM), Verb, Object (AKK). 
  • In English, you would call “a book” a direct object because the verb “to have” is transitive, meaning it carries one object. “I have.” isn’t generally a full sentence and is expected to be followed by an object.

So apparently all our problems are solved with the Akkusativ/direct object. What now? 

  • I give you a book. = Ich gebe dir ein Buch. 
  • This is the critical moment. Subject (NOM), Verb, Object (DAT), Object (AKK). 
  • Suddenly we have two objects because the verb “to give” makes us expect information about what we’re giving (direct object, AKK) and to whom we’re giving it (indirect object, DAT). 
  • Such verbs are called ditransitive, meaning they can carry two objects. Just saying “I give.” leaves us wondering what you’re talking about because we’re missing key information. 
  • English, as explained above, solves this with sentence order by making the indirect object come first or by indicating it with “to” (“I give a book to you”). German solves it with inflection, putting the indirect object in a different case. 
  • That’s why things like “Ein Buch gebe ich dir” and “Dir gebe ich ein Buch” are both possible in German.
  • There are also intransitive verbs which carry either no object at all or just a dative object (“Ich antworte ihm”). 

4. How do I know which verbs carry which object(s)? 

This list will save you.  At some point (once you’ve gotten to a certain level in German), you’ll have a gut feeling about which object(s) to use just from experience. Give it some time! 

5. What about determiners and pronouns? 

I actually think this is less work because it’s one table of endings each, and once you’ve got that down you should be fine. 

side note: As a native speaker and language nerd who loves grammar, it’s hard for me to judge if this was helpful or just confusing as hell. I hope I still answered your question to some extent! If you need more help or have problems with a specific sentence, let me know and i’ll try my best! :) 

A Simple Spell for Enchanting Objects
  • Object
  • Sage
  • Incense
  • White candle
  • Bowl of water
  • Salt

Light the candle, sage, and incense. Pass the object through the incense to cleanse it of any previous energies. State your intent of enchanting the object and its purpose aloud. Pass the object through the incense smoke (air) and candle flame (fire), and sprinkle some salt (earth) and water on it.

Charge it by the light of the full moon for an extra oomph, especially if the object is a crystal/has crystals on it.

Notional life is the life encouraged by government, mass education and the mass media. Each of these powerful agencies couples an assumption of its own importance with a disregard for individuality. Freedom of choice is the catch phrase but streamlined homogeneity is the objective. A people who think for themselves are hard to control and what is worse, in a money culture, they may be sceptical of product advertising. Since our economy is now a consumer economy, we must be credulous and passive. We must believe that we want to earn money to buy things that we don’t need. The education system is not designed to turn out thoughtful individualists, it is there to get us to work. When we come home exhausted from the inanities of our jobs we can relax in front of the inanities of the TV screen. This pattern, punctuated by birth, death and marriage and a new car, is offered to us as real life.

Children who are born into a tired world as batteries of new energy are plugged into the system as soon as possible and gradually drained away. At the time when they become adult and conscious they are already depleted and prepared to accept a world of shadows. Those who have kept their spirit find it hard to nourish it and between the ages of twenty and thirty, many are successfully emptied of all the resistance. I do not think it an exaggeration to say that most of the energy of most of the people is being diverted into a system which destroys them. Money is no antidote. If the imaginative life is to be renewed it needs its own coin.

—  Jeanette Winterson, ‘Imagination and Reality’, Art Objects
What an astonishing thing a book is. It’s a flat object made from a tree with flexible parts on which are imprinted lots of funny dark squiggles. But one glance at it and you’re inside the mind of another person, maybe somebody dead for thousands of years. Across the millennia, an author is speaking clearly and silently inside your head, directly to you. Writing is perhaps the greatest of human inventions, binding together people who never knew each other, citizens of distant epochs. Books break the shackles of time. A book is proof that humans are capable of working magic.
—  Carl Sagan