book news

bbc.co.uk
Indian cricket captain calmly reads book before batting - BBC News
Women's captain Mithali Raj enjoys some poetry to calm "jitters".

In a post-game interview, she said the book was by 13th-century Persian poet Rumi. She borrowed it from a coach as she was not allowed to bring her normal electronic e-reader with her. The game saw her become the first woman to score seven consecutive half-centuries in one-day international cricket. She scored 71 runs.

When asked who her favourite men’s cricketer was, she replied: “Do you ask the same question to a male cricketer? Do you ask them who their favourite female cricketer is?”

Here’s a story that … well, just read the headline: “KFC Has Published a Colonel Sanders Romance Novel in Honor of Mother’s Day and I Am Overwhelmed

Needless to say, I am also overwhelmed. Apparently KFC has released a 96-page novella, called – WAIT FOR IT – Tender Wings of Desire as a free e-book on Amazon. There’s a Mother’s Day peg to it all, but I’m honestly having a hard time focusing on that, because … just look at that book cover. In the words of the article’s author, “I have never been so horrified and yet delighted in my whole, entire life, and you will not judge me for this.”

Now let’s go have a weekend.

-Nicole

ibookbuddies  asked:

hi can you please explain the drama going on in the booklr community? with the white cis male author that got a movie deal? I haven't heard abut anything about this???

Yesterday, Publisher’s Weekly (a huge book news site) posted an article written by Sue Corbett about Scott Bergstrom‘s book called The CrueltyLink.

The headline reads: “YA Debut Gets Six-Figure Deal, Sold to 16 Territories and Jerry Bruckheimer (Pirates of the Caribbean)” and you think, oh my goodness, good for him, his book took off after being picked up and it’s a huge deal.

The articles writer, Sue Corbett, descibes the books as “Bergstrom’s heroine is Gwendolyn Bloom, a Jewish, slightly overweight 17-year-old, who is transformed into a “lean warrior with hair dyed fire-engine red,” during her mission to rescue her father, a kidnapped diplomat. Her search takes her into Europe’s most dangerous slums, and into contact with gangsters, spies, and arms dealers.”

You can probably already hear several alarm bells. For one it sounds like the plot of all three Taken movies -  plus several other people pointed out it sounds exactly like The Historian by Elizabeth Kostova. For some reason, Ms. Corbett makes a giant negative connotation on both overweight (and some people say Jewish as well) to a positive “lean warrior” and for some reason red hair is also an important part of the heroines development. Because of course overweight girls can’t rescue their fathers - they have to completely physically transform themselves in order to become truly kick-ass.

Then it gets worse when Scott Begstrom says “The morality of the book is more complicated than a lot of YA so I wanted to try doing it on my own,” Bergstrom said. “In a lot of YA, the conflict takes place inside a walled garden, set up by outside adult forces. If you think of those stories as a metaphor for high school, they start to make a lot more sense, but that was one thing I wanted to depart from.” 

Bergstrom disses both the YA genre writers and his primary audience - which is primarily women and girls. Not only that, but he sounds like he’s literally never read a YA book in his life, let alone have any business writing one. This was I think the primary spark that caused the firestorm on twitter.

Then the article praises the story as being revolutionary and outstanding, basically the next best thing that happened to YA. So when white man writes a YA book about a hyper-violent teenage heroine people say it’s morally ambiguous instead of being a high-school metaphor– he’s revolutionizing the genre, gets a six figure book deal, sells to 16 countries, and a movie deal with the Pirates of Caribbean director.  Meanwhile, all the female authors who’ve literally created and up-kept YA for decades are still dismissed and side-lined and deemed unimportant and are constantly forced to defend their work and prove it’s worth simply because they are women.

The article finishes with Scott’s agent Tracy Adams  “thought that Gwen would get a lot of leeway from readers because of her mission’s goal. “She’s going to do whatever it takes to save her dad and that was good enough for me,” Adams said. “Kicking butt to save your dad is actually a lot easier for me to swallow than kids killing kids in The Hunger Games.”

Can you believe that this woman basically dismisses one of the most important YA novels of our decade by trivializing it? Literally what she’s saying is “the violence is our book is more palatable that the violence you’ll see in that one really popular YA… you might have heard of it”

So as you can tell, this got a lot of people - authors, readers, and bloggers very angry. Not even because of this instant, but because this shit happens all the time, and women writers are tired of being side-lined every single time a white man decides that he’s better at doing what women have been doing their entire lives while he haven’t even bothered to learn anything about the subject.

Kayla Whaley @PunkinOnWheels on twitter created the #MorallyComplicatedYA hastag on twitter in response so that people could not only respond to this but also give recommendations about morally complicated YA novels that already exist. 

I’ve also heard that people have read excerpts from the book ( @buttermybooks and @ladybookmad and @cresdarnels) have told me that this guy basically created a “I’m better than those other females” character and basically bashes the YA dystopias that already exist and their readers.

At this point, I’m not really angry with Bergstrom but with the publishers, who clearly decided that this guy - a debut author- is worth a six figure deal, rights in 16 territories, and a movie deal with a basic plot like “fat Jewish girl gets lean and red-haired when her diplomat father goes missing and she has to go to Europe to rescue him while beating up and meeting up bad guys”.

They’re showing us what they think they find valuable while ignoring the fact that this guy is literally insulting not only to the genre but the readers who love it as well.

6

Marley Dias, the 12-year-old behind #1000BlackGirlBooks, is writing her own book!

  • In February 2016, Marley Dias, who was 11 at the time, launched the #1000BlackGirlBooks project, collecting books featuring black girls as the main character. 
  • Now, after collecting over 8,000 such books, Dias has decided to author a #BlackGirlBook of her own.
  • On Thursday, Scholastic announced that 12-year-old Dias had signed a deal with the publisher for a book due in Spring 2018. 
  • According to a press release, the book is a “keep-it-real guide” to helping kids and preteens make their dreams come true.
  • “Through her smarts and ingenuity, she’s delivered a jolt of inspiration that’s sent an unstoppable shock-wave to kids everywhere who’ve stood up with Marley to shout ‘Yes!’ to the power of positive action,” Scholastic’s vice president and executive editor Andrea Pinkney said.
  • “In this book, Marley will share her dynamic wisdom with readers everywhere.” Read more

follow @the-movemnt

2

6-year-old Vanae James-Bey has created a book celebrating black indigenous cultures across the globe

  • Even a 6-year-old understands that representation matters. Vanae James-Bey and her mother, Veronica Bey, teamed up to create a coloring book celebrating the black indigenous cultures around the world.
  • The coloring book, The Indigenous Adventures of Princess Vanae, has already been given high praise since going on sale on March 31. 
  • The book lets readers in on a journey learning about the history and culture of the native-born black people in Africa and the Americas, the Root reported.
  • “We’ve received tons of positive feedback, with orders from Australia to Amsterdam,” Bey told the Atlanta Black Star. “Parents asking for one for boys are as negative as the feedback gets.”
  • The book was a family project. Johnathan Ellerbee, Vanae’s uncle, provided the illustrations for the book in April 2016. 
  • Vanae, who is homeschooled, researched all kinds of indigenous cultures with her mother. Ellerbee then drew illustrations of the 6-year-old wearing their traditional dress and jewelry. Read more (4/27/17)

follow @the-movemnt

Image: Walt Whitman (FPG/Getty Images)

A literary treasure buried for more than a century has been unearthed by a grad student at the University of Houston. What’s notable about the work is its author — the beloved American poet Walt Whitman — and its place in Whitman’s literary career — just three years before he published Leaves of Grass.

Grad Student Discovers A Lost Novel Written By Walt Whitman

Image: Tracy K. Smith visits the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. (Shawn Miller/Library of Congress)

Tracy K. Smith knows many readers are intimidated by line breaks. She knows people don’t like identifying consonance, assonance or alliteration.

But Smith — the newly announced 22nd Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry of the United States — wants to help America push past that anxiety.

“What do you hear? What do you feel? What does this remind you of?” she asks NPR. “These are all real and valid reactions to a poem.”

The poet laureate is appointed by the librarian of Congress and fills the role for a year. Smith takes the mantle from Juan Felipe Herrera, who has served two terms.

Tracy K. Smith, New U.S. Poet Laureate, Calls Poems Her ‘Anchor’

4

Lion King remake casts Donald Glover as Simba, James Earl Jones as Mufasa

In the first sign that Disney’s new take on The Lion King is moving forward since it was originally announced back in September, director Jon Favreau has taken to his Twitter feed to start announcing the cast for the new film.

Donald Glover is set to voice the main role of Simba this time around, taking on the part from Matthew Broderick, while James Earl Jones is to reprise his role as the powerful Mufasa (because honestly, no one else would be allowed to, anyway!)

The Lion King is the latest Disney animated classic the studio to be given the live-action treatment, following the likes of Cinderella and Beauty and the Beast which is out next month. While there are no human characters in the story, Favreau plans to bring the animation to life with the same CGI techniques he used on his critically-acclaimed live-action version of The Jungle Book last year. 

In addition to Simba, Glover is taking on another iconic role, playing Lando Calrissian in the young Han Solo Star Wars spinoff, which is currently filming. Jones, well known as a Star Wars veteran, reprised his voice work as Darth Vader in December’s Rogue One: A Star Wars Story.

Image: Ali Cobby Eckermann. (Woodford Folk Festival/Flickr) 

When Ali Cobby Eckermann received an email announcing she’d won one of the world’s richest literary prizes (the $165,000 Windham-Campbell Prize), the unemployed Aboriginal poet says she had no idea what to think. Then, she tells The Guardian, she “pretty much just cried.” The poet, who lives in a caravan in South Australia with her elderly adoptive mother, added: “It’s going to change my life completely.”

Unemployed, Living In A Caravan — And Now, Winner Of A $165,000 Literary Prize