bonfire of the vanity

the best ways to describe neo yokio to someone who has never seen it:
  • the YuYu Hakusho/The Royal Tenenbaums/Fresh Prince of Bel Air crossover fanfic that none of us wanted but all of us deserved
  • a radical new adaptation of the classic 1980′s novel Bonfire of the Vanities as told by DJ Khaled and that guy who made all those “how to draw manga” books you read in the middle school library.
  • have you ever seen the 1990 indie movie Metropolitan, directed by Whit Stillman? if you haven’t you should, it’s funny. now, for those of you who have watched it, imagine that but with giant robots and demons.
  • do you like Woody Allen movies but wish they had more wizard battles and ki attacks? (and also don’t want to support a pedophile?) well have i got the show for you buddy!
  • Dragon Ball Z if it were a New Yorker cartoon
  • Ouran High School Host Club crossed with some quirky HBO dramadey about new york high society crossed with 4 am tumblr shitposts.
  • Jeeves and Wooster if Jeeves was a robot and Wooster was the protagonist of a PS1-era Final Fantasy game.
  • jaden smith makes fun of himself for hours at a time and it is amazing
  • seriously just watch it
Personal Mardi Gras thoughts

1.  Catholic Ash Wednesday comes from Genesis 3:19–that moment when God expelled Adam and Eve from the paradise of Eden as the price of their rebellion and lack of faith: “In the sweat of thy face shalt thou eat bread till thou return to the earth, out of which thou wast taken: for dust thou art, and into dust thou shalt return.” God is telling them, “Think about what you did. Repent. Seek Me out. For you have replaced My love with your selfishness; you have replaced My grace with your sin; you have replaced My gift of immortality with death, which means that some day, you must surrender your body to sickness and corruption, and the grave will claim you as you become ashes once again.”

2.   Catholic Ash Wednesday is a preparation of 40 days for renewing our baptismal commitment to Jesus, at Easter. The ashes are a sign of repentance and turning back to the Gospel, because death will come, and after death, we will be judged before the throne of Jesus Christ, “For the wages of sin is death” (Romans 6:23). But of course, we will joyously remember at Easter that the precious Blood of Jesus has regained “paradise lost.” The death brought down upon us by the first Adam is reversed by the second Adam. For as St. Paul reminds us in the same verse of 6:23: “But (by) the grace of God, (we have) life everlasting, in Christ Jesus our Lord!”

3.   For me, personally, Ash Wednesday and Lent are an annual reminder that I do not have control. The Lord God is in control. I, however, sometimes live with the illusion that I can control my life, my health, my friends, my mental state, my financial situation, my sense of peace and comfort. I can try to control these things, but sometimes all my efforts end in “ashes.” In the end, “vanity of vanities, and all is vanity” (Ecclesiastes 1:2). Lent is my time to throw my earthly sense of power and control into the “bonfire of vanities” which is penance and sacrifice. If I rise and have victory, it is only in the Blood of Jesus and His Calvary–“Through Him, with Him, and in Him.”

streepbuffy4ever  asked:

What's your favourite book/story?

I don’t think I could pick just one! 

My favourite authors in no order (top two favourite books from each) are:

  • Maritta Wolff (Whistle Stop and About Lyddy Thomas)
  • Norman Collins (London Belongs to Me and Love in Our Time)
  • Patrick Hamilton (Twenty Thousand Streets Under the Sky and Hangover Square)
  • Willa Cather (My Antonia and O Pioneers!)
  • F Scott Fitzgerald (The Beautiful and Damned and Tender is the Night)
  • Kurt Vonnegut (God Bless You Mr Rosewater and Breakfast of Champions)
  • Trollope (The Way We Live Now and the Palliser series)  
  • Steinbeck (The Winter of Our Discontent and East of Eden)
  • Zola (L'Assommoir and Nana)
  • Dostoevsky (Crime and Punishment and The Idiot)

I also really like Peyton Place by Grace Metalious, An American Tragedy and Sister Carrie by Theodore Dreiser, London Fields by Martin Amis, The L-Shaped Room by Lynne Reid Banks, Babbitt by Sinclair Lewis, The Bonfire of the Vanities by Tom Wolfe, The Jungle by Upton Sinclair, The Millstone by Margaret Drabble, The Best of Everything by Rona Jaffe, The Tenants of Moonbloom by Edward Lewis Wallant, The House of Mirth and The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton, The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon, A Time to be Born by Dawn Powell, Apartment in Athens by Glenway Wescott, The Heart is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers, Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier, The Mysteries of Paris by Eugene Sue, Valley of the Dolls by Jacqueline Susann, Last Exit to Brooklyn by Hubert Selby Jr, and everything by Nancy Mitford and Dominick Dunne. 

If I had to pick a short story, maybe A Perfect Day for Bananafish by  J. D. Salinger?

I have a tattoo of Behemoth from The Master and Margarita!

Blair: No. It’s a death trap. Being a muse never works out.

Serena: Plenty of women have been both lover and muse to famous artists. Like Picasso.

Blair: Serena! A guy starts out in his Blue Period and everything’s great. But it’s only a matter of time before he’s all into Cubism and it’s some other girl’s eye coming out of her forehead. 

-Favorite Scene 2x10 Part 2: Bonfire of the Vanity

anonymous asked:

a little faq about yourself? like your name, age, where you're from and what other things interest you ? if you're comfortable ofc - all the love :)

Okay here goes! My name’s Kalie, I’m 27, I’m from British Columbia, Canada! I’m married and I have two cats. This blog is my biggest hobby, but next is probably reading. 

My favourite authors (top two favourite books from each) are: 

  • Maritta Wolff (Whistle Stop and About Lyddy Thomas)
  • Norman Collins (London Belongs to Me and Love in Our Time)
  • Patrick Hamilton (Twenty Thousand Streets Under the Sky and Hangover Square)
  • Willa Cather (My Antonia and O Pioneers!)
  • F Scott Fitzgerald (The Beautiful and Damned and Tender is the Night)
  • Kurt Vonnegut (God Bless You Mr Rosewater and Breakfast of Champions)
  • Trollope (The Way We Live Now and the Palliser series)  
  • Steinbeck (The Winter of Our Discontent and East of Eden)
  • Zola (L'Assommoir and Nana)
  • Dostoevsky (Crime and Punishment and The Idiot)

I also really like Peyton Place by Grace Metalious, An American Tragedy and Sister Carrie by Theodore Dreiser, London Fields by Martin Amis, The Bonfire of the Vanities by Tom Wolfe, The Jungle by Upton Sinclair, The Millstone by Margaret Drabble, The Best of Everything by Rona Jaffe, The House of Mirth and The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton, The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon, The Heart is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers and everything by Nancy Mitford and Dominick Dunne. I have a tattoo of Behemoth from The Master and Margarita! 

I’m not a big fan of historical fiction but I really liked Ken Follet’s Kingsbridge and Century Trilogies. 

My favourite TV shows are It’s Always Sunny and Curb Your Enthusiasm. 

My favourite podcasts are My Brother My Brother and Me, and Uhh Yeah dude.

2

February 7th 1497: Bonfire of the Vanities

On this day in 1497 in Florence, thousands of objects including cosmetics, art, carnival masks, and books were burned in a so-called ‘bonfire of the vanities’. The bonfire was orchestrated by the supporters of Dominican priest Girolamo Savonarola, who spoke out against corruption in the Catholic Church and called for Christian renewal. The puritanical Savonarola became a prominent moral and political leader in Florence during the Medici exile, thundering against human wickedness and hedonism, which he framed in apocalyptic terms. Under his direction, street festivals and general frivolities were banned in Florence, and the famous bonfire destroyed objects seen as promoting the sin of vanity in the hope of cleansing the soul. Among Savanarola’s enemies was Pope Alexander VI, and in early 1498 he was arrested by Florentine authorities. The priest and his core supporters were tortured and condemned as heretics; Savanarola was executed on May 23rd 1498 in the Piazza della Signoria.

7

Time for Friday Reads! Here’s what we’re working on:

Film Critic Bob Mondello: I’m reading the novel on which one of my favorite Toronto International Film Festival films was based and marveling with every paragraph. If I’d read it first, I’m sure I would have sworn that no one would be able to make a film of André Aciman’s coming-of-age/coming-out story Call Me by Your Name. I mean, the book is gorgeous, lush, heartfelt and beautifully written, but doesn’t remotely seem dramatic (at least not in its first 40 pages). But man it made for drama on screen.

Executive Editor Edith Chapin: Enemy of the Good by Matthew Palmer, the prolific diplomat who spins great yarns from all over the globe. It should be just what I need for two long plane rides over the weekend.

Producer Jessica Reedy: I just started The Leavers by Lisa Ko, which was recently longlisted for the National Book Award. I’m only 50 pages in, but I can already tell it’s one of my favorite books of the year.

Correspondent Karen Grigsby Bates: Just finished Salman Rushdie’s The Golden House. Gatsby meets The Godfather, with a little Bonfire of the Vanities thrown in. Very satisfying.

Blogger Camila Domonoske: Who Fears Death by Nnedi Okorafor

Critic Annalisa Quinn: I’m reading Dunbar, Edward St. Aubyn’s retelling of King Lear for Hogarth.

News Assistant Sydnee Monday: Electric Arches by Eve L. Ewing

How about you??

-Nicole

Sparrows and Lollards: The Historical Parallel

A few weeks back I promised @poorquentyn that I’d write up that comparison between the English heretics known as Lollards, their connection with the Peasants’ Revolt of 1381, and the Sparrows of ASoIaF. It took a bit longer than I’d hoped, but as promised, and for your reading pleasure, the case for why the Lollards and the Peasants’ Revolt is the strongest parallel we’ve got here, and their similarities - theological and political.

I’d also like to thank @meddlingwithdragons for her assistance with this essay.

Keep reading

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111 guys who have ruined my life (in alphabetical order) - Tom Hanks (47/111)

I can’t stop thinking about that Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell AU >_<’ 

I just:

  • Quaker Will as America’s equivalent to Strange, who has a huge natural gift for magic (is probably part fairy himself) and has published multiple articles/books about it under the pseudonym Will Grey and keeps being asked (by other magicians and fairies alike) to help them summon the Raven King
  • and people who visit him in search of wisdom are shocked when they find that America’s pre-eminent magician is not the aged wizardly alpha they had been expecting but a young, stunningly-pretty, unmarried omega
  • (keeps a pack of dogs, chops his own kindling, catches his own fish)
  • who lives alone, by a lake in the woods,and seems to harbour no greater ambition than to become a genteel spinster
  • and he also gets visits from local pastors trying to talk him into giving up this unnatural life of financial and spiritual independence (but he can tell that really it’s because they’re creepers who want a pretty young omega to be grateful to them.)
  • And Fairy!Hannibal as The Gentleman who is courting him
  • and keeps fucking up his life unintentionally with his outlandish gifts
  • and causing odd things to happen (because he has no chill and doesn’t know how to human)

Keep reading