bombing of hiroshima

doctor strange is a modern updating of a racist trope from the 70s, and so is iron fist, daredevil, elektra, batman begins, tmnt, and on and on

ghost in the shell is something else - it is more like american remakes of godzilla or the grudge, in that it is taking a japanese story about japanese cultural and geographic specificity, and making it about white ppl in america, or, more obnoxiously, white ppl in japan

this makes it closer to that matt damon movie about the indonesian tsunami that was about how matt damon was affected by the indonesian tsunami, or the last samurai, or the great wall, or the wolverine, than your bog standard ‘this white dude is the best hero in america bc of what he brought back from his time in asia’

specifically, the recent american godzilla took the fukushima disaster and said, how could this affect bryan cranston?

and then famously had godzilla - the literal embodiment of japanese cultural trauma from the atomic bombings of hiroshima and nagasaki - swim five thousand miles across the entire pacific ocean so he could smash up san francisco and honolulu, instead of tokyo, and only threaten white ppl, leaving the japanese entirely out of their own stories

scarlett as the major isn’t reenacting an old white trope abt going to asia and coming back with secret knowledge - it’s not lucy two

instead, they took a japanese story, and put a white face on it

i’m not sure which is worse tbh

The Best Films of 2017 - Mid-Year List

There have already been many great films so far this year, so I felt it worth doing a run down of my favourite films of the year so far. These all reflect the cinema releases we’ve had so far in the UK in 2017 - for that reason this list includes some films that were released in the US in 2016. Enjoy, and I’d love to hear your thoughts on the best films of the year so far!

Honourable mentions: Their Finest, Colossal, Gifted

1. Get Out, dir. Jordan Peele

This film really knocked me for six, to such an extent that I simply had to see it twice in the cinema. It got even better upon a re-watch, when I was able to watch it with full knowledge of the characters’ underlying motives and the things to come. It’s a terrifying concept (the racism of an all-white suburb is taken to a horrifying extreme) executed with incredible panache, and you feel every emotion that Chris goes through thanks to Daniel Kaluuya’s excellent performance. Get Out also represents one of the most brilliantly communal experiences I’ve ever had at the cinema - I won’t spoil it, but let’s just say that the audience erupted into spontaneous applause at a key moment in the climax. Simply fantastic. 

2. The Handmaiden, dir. Park Chan-wook

This film is exquisite - it’s first and foremost a beautiful boundary-smashing love story, and an absolutely marvellous tale of female defiance. It transplants Sarah Waters’ novel Fingersmith to 1930s Korea, and the story is effortlessly adapted to become intrinsically interwoven with its new setting. Sookee is a talented pickpocket plucked from a thieves den and sent as a handmaiden to trick a rich heiress into falling for a conman. To say any more would spoil the twists, but this film is just a masterwork of suspense, keeping you guessing throughout a series of interlocking pieces that take their time to reveal their secrets. I’ve seen the theatrical cut and the extended version, and they’re both great - you’re in for a treat with either.

3. Jackie, dir. Pablo Larrain

This is a film that soars on the strength of Natalie Portman’s incredible performance, which is complemented by Mica Levi’s haunting score. Portman’s performance is painfully vivid, with her agony and wretchedness coming through so intensely that it’s often uncomfortable to watch. Jackie is probably the best portrait of grief I’ve ever seen, and it sucks you into a famous historic event by providing an incredibly intimate perspective on it. This is great cinema, but be prepared for suffering.

4. A Cure for Wellness, dir. Gore Verbinski

This is a delightfully strange Gothic fairy tale of a film, and I’m amazed and impressed that a Hollywood studio gave Gore Verbinski a budget sufficient to pull it off with such beauty and style. I’ve seen this film attract love and hate in equal measure, but I adore it - the trailers set you up for a rehash of Shutter Island, but nothing could be further from the truth beyond the isolated setting. If I had to compare this to anything, I would compare it to Roger Corman’s Poe cycle of films from the 1960s - it has a similarly lurid sensibility and a deep-seated sense of fantastic romanticism at its core. Great if you’re after something uncompromisingly bonkers.

5. Wonder Woman, dir. Patty Jenkins

This film represented pure joy for me - I couldn’t have anticipated how emotional I was going to get at witnessing a (wonder!)woman crossing No Man’s Land and deflecting bullets with her bracelets. This simultaneously rejects the wry self-awareness of the Marvel films and the grim self-importance of the previous DC movies, instead unabashedly depicting a superhero who triumphs thanks to her overriding belief in love and compassion. Patty Jenkins adds endless little touches - from funny moments to quiet scenes where characters talk simply to learn about each other - that enrich the film and make it feel vivid and intimate in a very rare and special way.

6. Silence, dir. Martin Scorsese

This is truly the work of a master filmmaker, and it represents a stunning artistic achievement and a moving and intelligent investigation of the threshold of faith. Scorsese tried to get this made for decades before finally succeeding, and his passion for and belief in the project shine through in every painstakingly crafted frame. Silence is equal parts beauty and brutality, and it uses this contrast to illuminate the painful questions that the faithful must ask themselves when faced with the harsh reality of the present world. It’s heavy stuff, but well worth your time if you’re up for a film that raises more questions than it answers.

7. In This Corner of the World, dir. Sunao Katabuchi

I had no idea this film existed until a few days before I saw it, but I was really struck by its poetic treatment of the joys and tragedies of life. This film follows a young bride who moves to live with her husband’s family in WWII-era Japan, and while it deals unflinchingly with the trauma and horror of war - particularly the bombing of Hiroshima - it’s also surprisingly funny and ultimately hopeful. The power of this film comes through in the little moments of human connection and the way that the full potential of animation is exploited to maximum effect.

8. La La Land, dir. Damien Chazelle

A lovely ode to the classic Hollywood musical, La La Land is a technical marvel that sticks with me because of its heart and humanity (those words are recurring a lot, right?). It tells a very small story of a love affair between two dreamers in Hollywood, but it feels much bigger than them because of the way in which their story is told. La La Land draws from influences across the spectrum of cinema, and its homages to the classics are joyful and loving. The final ‘what might have been’ sequence represents the perfect marriage of raw emotion and filmmaking virtuosity. 

9. Okja, dir. Bong Joon-ho

Not many films can balance flatulence jokes with uncompromising critique of capitalist greed, but Okja pulls it off with aplomb. The core story hinges on the innocent and endearing friendship between a young girl named Mija and a bio-engineered super pig called Okja, and the film succeeds because you totally buy their connection and desperately want the two of them to have their wish and live together in the mountains. I’m delighted that Netflix gave Bong Joon-ho a platform to make such a weird beast.

10. Logan, dir. James Mangold

Logan may be bleak, but that isn’t what makes it great - Logan is fantastic cinema because it remembers that superheroes are still people who struggle with their own souls as much as super-villains. This film features the best character work managed in any of the X-Men films, and Hugh Jackman, Patrick Stewart and - in particular - Dafne Keen give heart-rending performances that really ground the film and give it an emotional core. I hope we get more superhero films like this, and that the takeaway from it for the industry is the importance of stressing character rather than frantic spectacle.

Most anticipated films still to come: War for the Planet of the Apes, Valerian and the City of A Thousand Planets, Dunkirk, The Beguiled, Mother!, Logan Lucky, Blade Runner 2049, Murder on the Orient Express, The Shape of Water, Annihilation, Star Wars: The Last Jedi

2

Cannikin was detonated on November 6, Amchitka island, Alaska, 1971. It was the largest underground nuclear test in US history. The ground lifted 20 feet caused by an explosive force almost 400 times the power of the Hiroshima bomb. The explosion caused a seismic shock of 7.0 on the Richter scale, causing rockfalls and turf slides of a total of 35,000 square feet Though earthquakes and tsunamis predicted by environmentalists did not occur, a number of small tectonic events did occur in the following weeks, thought to be due to the interaction of the explosion with local tectonic stresses. (Source)

the-blue-butterfly-effect  asked:

Xylion is definitely not ready to hear about nuclear warfare

He most definitely is not.


Xylion was sitting in the break room, drowning out the cries of the humans as they played that sickly game known as Grand Theft Auto V. The occasional explosions and screams from pedestrians was terrifying.

However, after thirty minutes, the sound seemed to stop. Xylion was confused, so he took a glance at the Humans, only to see them playing a different game.

Fallout 4.

 Xylion carefully made his way over to the TV and sat down next to Human Jenny, who was carefully watching Human Fredrick as he navigated the world around him. Xylion was confused about the way it was put together. It was mostly destroyed, and was clearly not the Earth he had seen the one time he went down there. “What is this place?”

“Diamond City.” Human Fredrick said, absentmindedly.

“And what happened to it?”

“The world got nuked.”

“’Nuked’?”

Human Fredrick sighed as he paused the game. He turned around to face him. “I’m going to assume you’ve never heard of a Nuclear Bomb before, huh?”

“What is a ‘Nuclear Bomb’? I know what a bomb is, but those aren’t typically used nowadays.”

Human Isaac held back laughter after hearing that. Xylion looked towards him, but Human Jenny was the one who refocused his attention. He nodded, apologizing to Human Fredrick for losing focus.

“It’s alright. We humans do it all the time. Anyways, a Nuclear bomb is similar to a normal bomb, except way worse.”

Xylion was confused. A bomb was already terrible. When activated, it could kill hundreds to thousands of people. How worse could a Nuclear bomb be?

Before he could ask it, Human Jenny stood up. “Let me go get my textbook.”

He watched her run off. Xylion sighed, and began to knot his tentacles together. Human Isaac seemed transfixed on it. “Woah, now that’s some cool shit.”

“Thanks?”

Human Jenny came back moments later, carrying a few textbooks. She dropped them on the ground before grabbing one. “This one talks all about World War II.”

Xylion attempted to throw his tentacles in the air, but he only tightened the knot, and ended up crying out in pain. “World War II?” He managed to squeak out as Human mason helped him untie his tentacles.

“Yep.”

“More than one?”

“Yep.”

Xylion looked down as Human Fredrick grabbed the textbook from Human Jenny. He flipped through the book before showing a page to Xylion. There were models of some weird shaped objects labeled ‘Little Boy’ and ‘Fat Man’. “These are the two nuclear bombs used at the end of World War II. Little Boy was dropped on a city called Hiroshima in Japan, and Fat Man on Nagasaki.”

“Why? What was the point?”

“Well, see, in World War II, there were the Axis powers and the Allies. The Axis was built up of Germany, known as the Nazis at the time and led by Adolf Hitler, Italy led by Benito Mussolini, and Japan led by Emperor Hirohito. The Allies were the opposing team that is considered the good side now. The three main ones, while there were others, is the United Kingdom led by William Churchill, the Soviet Union led by Josef Stalin, and the United States led by President Franklin Roosevelt, at least for a good chunk of the war.”

Xylion rubbed his tentacles together. “And why were the bombs used?”

“I’m getting to that. So, Germany and Italy were eventually defeated, but Japan had different beliefs when it came to war. It was essentially, surrender is never an option and death is more worthy than surrender. So, surrendering was not an option for them. The United States, worried the war would drag on for even longer, turned to president Harry Truman. Truman had to either decide to continue fighting as they had, or threaten them with Project Manhattan. No one really knew what it was, but all he said as a threat was that they would drop a bomb on one of their heavily populated cities.”

“And why would they do that? They could kill everyone!”

“That was kind of the point, Xylion.” Human Isaac said, rolling his eyes.

Xylion sighed, ignoring him. “Anyways…” Human Fredrick said, narrowing his eyes at his crewmate. “Japan refused to surrender, either not believing America or just out of their principle, I can’t exactly remember. So, America sent Little Boy off to Hiroshima. And they dropped the first nuke.”

“A nuke is essentially a large scale bomb. They not only have huge explosions, but they also release a ton of radiation, which is highly poisonous to humans. In large amounts, of course. It can cause different deformities and cancer, which can be incurable in some cases. 70,000 to 80,000 people were killed by the blast, and another 70,000 injured. About 20,000 military personnel were killed and/or injured.”

Xylion couldn’t believe what he was hearing. With that many dead, surely they would’ve changed their principle, right? Accepted defeat?

“So they stopped fighting?”

“No. They refused to surrender, so we were forced to drop another bomb on them. Fat Man. We dropped it on Nagasaki, another Japanese city. The death toll, in it’s entirety, grew to 129,000 to 240,000, though some believe the total death toll could be higher. Japan soon surrendered.”

Xylion felt his body begin to get covered in mucus. He grimaced. “Surely you don’t use them anymore, right?”

“Of course. Nuclear weapons are strictly banned in military wars. Now, it’s used as energy and fuel.”

“At least Japan has moved back into those cities, correct? Rebuilt everything?”

“Well…”

“Well what?”

Human Fredrick scratched the back of his head. “The cities are still uninhabitable.”

“What.”

“See, the radiation is still sticking around, and it will stay there for a few decades, I believe. No one can set foot in there without getting sick or dying.”

“So no one can live there?”

“Unless they want to grow a third eye or die of cancer, nah.” Human Isaac said, grinning at Xylion.

Human Fredrick sighed. “Essentially, yes.”

Xylion shook his head.

Humans were terrible, especially to themselves.

He stood up and carefully made his way back to his cabin. Once he got into his room, he sat on his bed, the horrors of what he heard still replaying in his mind.

Xylion didn’t think he could ever be the same, knowing just what humans did to one another.


I hope you enjoyed that.

I’m a huge history nerd, and I especially love learning and talking about WWII, mainly because of how it showed what humans are capable of, etcetera. I just think it was an interesting time period, because it helped dictate everything that has happened thus far. The Vietnam War, the Cold War, The Korean War, and so on.

Anyways, I especially know a lot about nuclear bombs and energy because we had to do a whole project on it in Chemistry last year. Me and my partner did the Yucca Mountain Power Plant in Nevada, but I still paid attention to Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

So yeah, I hope you enjoyed the-blue-butterfly-effect!

The World According to Trump

The starkest difference between dictatorships and democracies is that democracies are ruled by laws, and dictatorships are ruled by dictators.

The “rule of law,” as it’s often referred to, stands for laws that emerge from a process responsive to the majority, that are consistently applied, and are applicable to everyone regardless of their position or power.

Donald Trump doesn’t seem to understand this. Within a matter of days, Trump has bombed Syria and a group of fighters in eastern Afghanistan.

On April 12, Trump authorized the Pentagon to drop a 22,000-pound GBU-43/B Massive Ordnance Air Blast Bomb (MOAB) on people described as “Islamic State forces” in eastern Afghanistan near the Pakistani border.

It’s the first time this bomb – nicknamed the “mother of all bombs,” and the largest air-dropped munition in the U.S. military’s inventory – has ever been used in a combat.

It’s the largest explosive device America has utilized since dropping atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in World War II. (By comparison, U.S. aircraft commonly drop bombs that weigh between 250 to 2,000 pounds.)

Why, exactly? It’s not clear. And what was Trump’s authority to do this? Even less clear.

We still don’t know exactly why Trump bombed Syria. He said it was because Syria’s president, Bashar al-Assad, used chemical weapons on innocent civilians, including children.

But it wasn’t the first time Assad had used chemical weapons. When he did in 2013, Trump counseled against bombing Syria in response.

And where did Trump get the authority to bomb Syria? Assad is a vicious dictator who does terrible things to his people. But U.S. law doesn’t authorize presidents to go to war against vicious dictators who do terrible things to their people.

The Constitution leaves it up to Congress, not the president, to declare war.

In 2014, President Barack Obama began hostilities against the Islamic State, arguing that Congress’s approval of George W. Bush’s wars against Afghanistan in 2001 and Iraq in 2002 provided him sufficient to authority.

Well, maybe. But there’s no way Trump can rely on Congress’s approval of these wars to bomb Syria.

And it’s a stretch to argue that a group claiming or alleged to be connected to ISIS, but located in eastern Afghanistan far away from where ISIS is attempting to establish an Islamic State, is the same as the Islamic State.

In a democracy, the rule of law means that we the people are supposed to be in charge, through our elected representatives in Congress.

It can be a heavy responsibility. It is especially weighty when it comes to warfare, to the destruction and annihilation of human beings.

As Commander-in-Chief, a president is empowered to manage the military might of the nation. But he is not empowered to initiate warfare on his own. That’s our job. 

The world according to Trump is becoming increasingly dangerous, in part because we are not doing our job.