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THE TRUTH ABOUT TRUMPONOMICS

When Donald Trump spoke at Boeing’s factory in North Charleston, South Carolina – unveiling Boeing’s new 787 “Dreamliner” – he congratulated Boeing for building the plane “right here in the great state of South Carolina.“

But that is pure fantasy.

Trump also used the occasion to tout his “America First” economics, stating “our goal as a nation must be to rely less on imports and more on products made here in the U.S.A.”

Trump seems utterly ignorant about global competition – and about what’s really holding back American workers.

Start with Boeing’s Dreamliner itself. It’s not “made in the U.S.A.” It is assembled in the USA. Most of the parts and almost a third of the cost of the entire plane come from overseas.

For example:

The center fuselage and horizontal stabilizers came from Italy.

The aircraft’s landing gears, doors, electrical power conversion system - from France.

The main cabin lighting came from Germany.

The cargo access doors from Sweden.

The lavatories, flight deck interiors, and galleys from Japan.

Many of the engines from the U.K.

The moveable trailing edge of the wings from Canada.

Notably, the foreign companies that made these parts don’t pay their workers low wages. In fact, when you add in the value of health and pension benefits, most of these foreign workers get a better deal than do Boeing’s workers.

These nations also provide most young people with excellent educations and technical training, as well as universally-available health care.

To pay for all this, these countries also impose higher tax rates on their corporations and wealthy individuals than does the United States. And their health, safety, environmental, and labor regulations are stricter.

Not incidentally, they have stronger unions.

So why is so much of Boeing’s Dreamliner coming from these high-wage, high-tax, high-cost places?

Because the parts made by workers in these countries are better, last longer, and are more reliable than parts made anywhere else.

There’s a critical lesson here.

The way to make the American workforce more competitive isn’t to build an economic wall around America.

It’s to invest more in the education and skills of Americans, in on-the-job training, in a healthcare system that reaches more of us. And to give workers a say in their companies through strong unions.

In other words, we get a first-class workforce by investing in the productive capacities of Americans  – and rewarding them with high wages.

Economic nationalism is no substitute for building the competitiveness of American workers.

jeremy2191  asked:

Does all capsules drops in Kazakhstan on return after every mission?

Since the US Space Shuttle retired in 2011, we launch to and return from the Space Station with the Russian Space Agency.  So yes, these capsules (the Soyuz) land in Kazakhstan (or surrounding regions).  However, different spacecrafts have different reentry trajectories, depending on where they aim to land.  As you might recall, the Apollo mission capsules landed in the ocean.  Since Space-X and Boeing are currently building new vehicles so that we will also launch from the US again to get to the International Space Station, these spacecraft will return to the US. For example, you may have seen footage of Space-X cargo vehicles splashing down into the Pacific over the last few years. The Boeing Starliner plans to land on land instead of water. NASA is also currently building the Orion spacecraft, which will take us to destinations beyond low earth orbit (where the Space Station is), whether that be the Moon or Mars or another target.  Orion will also splash down in the ocean.  

SHITPOSTER IN CHIEF

US President-elect Donald Trump has sent another stock reeling into the red.

Barely a week after taking shots at Boeing, Donald Trump took aim at Lockheed Martin’s F-35 fighter jet programme, saying the cost was “out of control”.

“The F-35 program and cost is out of control. Billions of dollars can and will be saved on military (and other) purchases after January 20th,” Mr Trump said.

Following the tweet on Monday morning, shares of the aerospace company plunged by more than 4 per cent in early trade.

Based on the number of shares outstanding, the tweet has shaved just over $3.5bn from Lockheed’s market value.

Shares of the New York-listed company fell by more than 5 per cent by midday on Monday, and had not fully recovered by market close. By 4pm Eastern Time, the share price had only bounced back half way by about 2.5 per cent.

The President-elect’s comment has also had a knock-on for other companies involved in the project, which is worth up to $400bn over the contract’s duration.

Shares in Northrop Gumman were down 4 per cent, while Britain’s BAE Systems saw its stock slip 1.3 per cent after Mr Trump’s tweet. Neither of those companies’ share prices have recovered throughout Monday.

Mr Trump’s latest twitter firestorm comes just one week after he used the same social media platform to take aim at Boeing over costs for the replacement Air Force One.

Boeing fell by 1.5 per cent after the tweet but ended the trading day positive.

Although Lockheed’s dip is temporary, it is a reminder of investors’ knee-jerk reaction when the President-elect expresses his views on a company. His tweet is also a cause for concern in the longer term, as the anticipated increase in defence spending in 2017 may not be as lucrative to contractors as they had hoped.

A Lockheed Martin executive responded to Mr Trump’s attack, insisting that the company has taken steps to cut costs.

“Since the beginning, we have invested hundreds of millions of dollars to reduce the price of the airplane by about 70 per cent since its original costing, and we project it to be about £85m in the 2019 or 2020 time frame”, said Jeff Babione, Lockheed Martin’s F-35 programme leader.

A week before Mr Trump won the presidential election, the US Defence Department and Lockheed Martin concluded their 14-month negotiations on their ninth contract for F-35 fighter jets.

The F-35 Lightining II is meant to become the next leading-edge platform for the US Air Force, Navy and Marines, as well for the armed forces of nearly 10 US allies, including the UK, Netherlands and Australia.

Last week, the President-elect critcised Boeing by claiming the total cost of Boeing’s 747 Air Force One programme would be more than $4bn.

On Twitter, he said: "Boeing is building a brand new 747 Air Force One for future presidents, but costs are out of control, more than $4 billion. Cancel order!”

The aircraft manufacturer took a $1.4bn hit to its market value.

In response to Mr Trump’s tweet, Boeing said that its current contract with the Air Force is actually for $170m.

DONALD TRUMP HAS WEAPONIZED SHITPOSTING

Trump’s Creeping Tyranny

On the evening of December 7, minutes after a local Indiana union leader, Chuck Jones, criticized Trump on CNN for falsely promising to keep Carrier jobs in the U.S., Trump tweeted, “Chuck Jones, who is President of United Steelworkers 1999, has done a terrible job representing workers. No wonder companies flee country!” 

Since that tweet went out, Chuck Jones has received death threats, according to CNN.

A few days before, Boeing’s CEO Dennis Muilenberg was quoted in the Chicago Tribune gently chiding Trump for being against trade. Muilenberg noted that trade is essential to the U.S. economy, as reflected in the “large and growing percentage of our business” coming from international sales, including commercial jet orders from China.

Moments later, Trump tweeted: “Boeing is building a brand new 747 Air Force One for future presidents, but costs are out of control, more than $4 billion. Cancel order!” Later he added “We want Boeing to make a lot of money but not that much money.” 

Boeing shares immediately took a hit. As it turns out, Boeing does not even have a $4 billion order to make Air Force One planes. 

Trump doesn’t take kindly to anyone criticizing him – not journalists (whom he refers to as “dishonest,” “disgusting” and “scum” when they take him on), not corporate executives, not entertainers who satirize him, not local labor leaders, no one. 

The President-elect’s tendency to go after people who criticize him by sending false and provocative statements to his 16 million twitter followers not only imperils those people and their organizations. 

It also poses a clear and present danger to our democracy.

Democracy depends on the freedom to criticize those in power without fear of retribution. 

No President or President-elect in history has ever publicly condemned individual citizens for criticizing him. That occurs in two-bit dictatorships intent on stamping out dissent. 

No President or President-elect has ever bypassed the media and spoken directly to large numbers of his followers in order to disparage individual citizens who criticize him. That occurred in the fascist rallies of the 1930s. 

America came closest to this in the 1950s when Senator Joseph McCarthy wrecked the lives of thousands of American citizens whom he arbitrarily and carelessly claimed were communists. 

McCarthy’s reign of terror ended when a single man asked him publicly, during the televised hearings McCarthy was conducting, “have you no decency, sir?” In that moment, Americans began to see McCarthy for the tyrant he was. 

McCarthy’s assistant was Roy Cohn, an attorney who perfected the art of character assassination. Roy Cohn was also one of Donald J. Trump’s mentors. 

Trump’s capricious use of power to denigrate and even endanger his critics must end. He is not yet our President. When he becomes so and has far greater power, our freedom and our democracy could be gravely jeopardized.  

We must join together to condemn these acts. Has Trump no decency?