bob-longhi

8

Scans - George Harrison in Hawaii, 1978, 1987, 1991 (with Dhani) and 1999; scanned from Living in the Material World, the Concert for George and Brainwashed album booklets (and previously posted here: x; x; x; x; x; x; x).

Photos © Harrison Family

“The couple spent much time in Hawaii, but when she’s asked about favorite memories or locales in the islands, [Olivia Harrison] demurs. ‘I’m sorry, I can’t talk about Hawaii. It’s too…’ Her voice trails off before she can fill in the missing word.” - “Here now, she lives for George” by Randy Newman, Los Angeles Times, 9 March 2005 [x]

“'He gravitated toward the people of the earth. He had a fondness for them,’ said Michael Spalding, who represented Harrison in his real estate and financial dealings when he first purchased his 63-acre East Maui property in 1981. He would later buy more than 100 additional acres there.
'When he came to Maui, he didn’t seek out the mighty, the rich and the powerful. He sought out the Hawaiians. He was very loyal to the people he befriended, and they were very loyal to him,’ Spalding said.
Nahiku residents, such as Arnold Allencastre, knew Harrison simply as Keoki.
'He was a good guy, a nice guy,’ said Allencastre, whose father once owned the land Harrison had acquired. 'He liked the local people, too.’
Harrison hired Allencastre, a heavy-equipment operator, to help clear his land so he could build his house and plant his gardens. But their relationship wasn’t just a working one. Allencastre and his wife, Cynthia, would socialize with the Harrisons. George and his wife, Olivia, would come to their parties and they, in turn, would be invited to an occasional lunch.
The last time Allencastre saw Harrison was about a year ago when he and Olivia stopped by to say hello and catch up on what was happening in town.
Former caretaker Dot Pua remembers Harrison as a sweet and thoughtful boss. One time, when she was cutting his hair, Harrison asked about her favorite songs. Her reply was, ’“While My Guitar Gently Weeps” by Kenny Rankin,’ and a couple other tunes. Harrison didn’t say anything.
It was only years later, while leafing through a Beatles songbook, that she discovered that 'While My Guitar Gently Weeps’ was written by Harrison.
'My goodness, he must have thought I was so dumb,’ she said.
Pua, now a beautician at the Hotel-Hana Maui, said her time at the Harrison estate was a wonderful experience.
'But it made me appreciate my simple life,’ she said. 'When I was hired, Olivia told me my life will change — and it did. We got a dog and locked the doors, something we never did before. Strangers kept coming onto the property.’
Strangers were something Harrison worked hard to avoid and that aversion exploded into a lawsuit with neighbors who were allowing visitors to use a path over his property to get to the ocean. The lawsuit was finally settled this year.
'He used to tell me that he wanted to be famous, but after three or four months it was the worst thing that happened to him,’ said restaurateur Bob Longhi, who was introduced to the former Beatle in 1977 and continued as a friend.
'George was a super guy, a humble-type person. He wasn’t like, “I’m George Harrison.” He was fun-loving.’
Harrison fell in love with Maui, Longhi said, and in 1979 wrote 'Soft-Hearted Hana,’ dedicating it to Longhi on his 'George Harrison’ album.
Paul Weinstein, owner of Bounty Music in Kahului, remembers the former Beatle coming into his shop anywhere from six to a dozen times over the years.
He said Harrison was fascinated with the ukulele and bought perhaps as many as a dozen over the years.
During one visit, Weinstein allowed him to try out various instruments in an office behind the Hana Highway store.
'It was one of the thrills of my life,’ he said. 'Whoever thought I’d be able to sit in a room, just me and him, and be able to hear him try out some instruments.’
Maui guitarist Harry Troupe, a former Bounty Music manager, said he was stunned to find Harrison in the shop one day.
'He was so humble to me,’ he said. 'It really floored me to see a guy of that stature treat me the way he did. You could just feel the warmth from him.’“ - "Maui gave ex-Beatle Harrison the quiet he craved” by Timothy Hurley, The Honolulu Advertiser, 1 December 2001 [x]

Stevie Nicks & restaurant owner/chef Bob Longhi in Maui with George Harrison the day he wrote Soft Hearted Hana which he dedicated to his long time friend, Bob. This photo was taken in the late 1970s by Stevie’s friend Mary DeVitto & is very special to Stevie. Bob is the one who arranged the meeting as he was going to visit George & Stevie came along with him. Stevie said of this moment:

“The photo was taken by my best friend, Mary DeVitto,She had given me a copy of it a long time ago, and I had it made into an 8 x 10 and put in a little frame. When I go on the road it goes right on my makeup mirror, so before I go on stage, whether it’s with Fleetwood Mac or me in my solo career, the three of us are looking back at me and that has been my inspiration every single night. There’s lots of nights where you kind of go, I wish I didn’t have to go on stage tonight, I’m tired, I don’t feel like doing it, and I look at George Harrison and look at Longhi and look at me and I go, well, you just have to, because it’s important, it’s important to make people happy, so get out of your chair, put on your boots and go out there and do your thing.”

Something Else Reviews: "My inspiration every single night"

External image

Source

“For years, Stevie Nicks has kept a treasured 1970-era photograph framed and with her on the road, getting untold moments of inspiration while touring both as a solo artist and with Fleetwood Mac. She’s pictured with George Harrison, along with the well-known Maui restauranteur Bob Longhi. […]
‘When I go on the road it goes right on my makeup mirror,’ Nicks says. 'So before I go on stage, whether it’s with Fleetwood Mac or me in my solo career, the three of us are looking back at me and that has been my inspiration every single night. There’s lots of nights where you kind of go, I wish I didn’t have to go on stage tonight, I’m tired, I don’t feel like doing it, and I look at George Harrison and look at Longhi and look at me and I go: "Well, you just have to, because it’s important, it’s important to make people happy, so get out of your chair, put on your boots and go out there and do your thing.”’