bob-iger

Robert Iger Extends Contract as Disney CEO Through Mid-2019

Disney chairman-CEO Bob Iger has extended his contract as the company’s chief executive by one year, through July 2, 2019, a move that had been expected as Disney continues its long search for his successor.

“Given Bob Iger’s outstanding leadership, his record of success in a changing media landscape, and his clear strategic vision for Disney’s future, it is obvious that the company and its shareholders will be best served by his continued leadership as the board conducts the robust process of identifying a successor and ensuring a smooth transition,” said Orin C. Smith, who is the lead independent director of Disney’s board.

The pact calls for Iger to serve as consultant to Disney for three years following his exit as CEO. He’s held the top job at the Mouse House since succeeding Michael Eisner in early 2005.

“Mr. Iger has led the Walt Disney Company to unprecedented success during his 11 years as CEO, driving Disney to new creative heights, expanding the company’s global reach, fostering technological innovation, and delivering year-after-year of record financial results,” Smith said. “During his tenure, Mr. Iger has created enormous value for shareholders, with total shareholder return of 448%, compared to 144% for the S&P 500, and a dramatic increase in the company’s market capitalization to $177 billion from $46 billion.”

Breaking News: Disney Buys Itself

Adding to a string of recent acquisitions, the Walt Disney Company has announced its intention of purchasing itself for the amount of $105.5 billion. 

This will be the company’s most significant purchase since its acquisition of Lucasfilm in 2012. This deal is expected to cede the entirety of both Disney’s intellectual property and numerous subsidies to to Disney.

In a statement, Disney CEO Bob Iger simply stated, “AT&T and Time Warner? PLEASE. The only thing worth more than Disney is Disney. After this deal, I will be eternal. I will become the Alpha CEO.“(x).

It’s of-f-f-f-f-icial: “Frozen 2” is in development at Walt Disney Animation Studios with directors Chris Buck and Jennifer Lee and producer Peter Del Vecho, the Oscar®-winning filmmaking team behind “Frozen.” The news was announced at Disney’s Annual Meeting of Shareholders this morning by Bob Iger, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of The Walt Disney Company; John Lasseter, Chief Creative Officer of Walt Disney and Pixar Animation Studios; and actor Josh Gad, who provides the voice of Olaf from “Frozen.” A release date and production details are on ice for now.

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Disney CEO Reveals That He’s Hannah Montana

In a shocking display at a press conference earlier today, Disney CEO Bob Iger revealed that he is, in fact, worldwide pop sensation Hannah Montana.

“I’m tired of living this double life,” Iger said solemnly, as he put on a blonde wig in front of a crowd of confused reporters.  “Dang flabbit, I just wanna be me!”

“This definitely explains his recent absence in command,” says Disney analyst Jane Furrow.  “Of course he neglected Hollywood Studios, ignored dozens of successful Disney franchises, and fostered a lack of general original content in this company for all these years! He was too busy being Hannah Montana!”

Iger declined to make an official statement to reporters, saying only, “Don’t forget to buy my new album Live Action Remake! available now on Amazon and iTunes!”(x).

variety.com
Marvel’s Kevin Feige on ‘Spider-Man’s’ Future and Why Brie Larson Was Perfect for ‘Captain Marvel’
By Brent Lang

Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige is on one heck of a run. Each of the company’s 14 films over the past eight years has opened in first place at the domestic box office, and they’ve brought in more than $10 billion globally. That success is a boon for Disney CEO Bob Iger, who led the $4 billion acquisition of the comic-book empire Marvel Entertainment in 2009.

But it’s Feige who is credited with Marvel’s signature style — a blend of humor, optimism, and spectacle that has attracted legions of fans around the world. And he’s had great success in elevating lesser-known characters, like Iron Man, Captain America, and Doctor Strange, into big-screen brands.

Feige spoke with Variety about Marvel’s plans to promote diversity, upcoming projects, and what it is that makes him anxious.

How much freedom do you give actors to put their own imprint on characters?
They have a lot of freedom to take what has made the characters as popular [as they’ve been] for as long as they’ve appeared in the comics, and evolve it and grow it. Think about what you saw Benedict [Cumberbatch] do in “Doctor Strange” — he embodied that character and made it his own. That’s similar to what Robert Downey Jr. did by molding and shaping and turning [Iron Man] into something even more contemporary and relatable.

Would you recast your biggest superheroes with other actors if, say, Robert Downey Jr. or Chris Evans decide they want to move on?
Luckily we don’t have to make that decision anytime soon. There are a lot of movies that everyone is signed on for, and we get to enjoy them for a long time. Robert Downey Jr. is Iron Man, and right now I can’t envision anyone else. Chris Evans has embodied Captain America as well as any actor has ever embodied an iconic pop-culture figure like that. I go back to Chris Reeve as Superman as the gold standard, and I think Evans is right there. I couldn’t imagine anybody else.

But you also look to history: We have a new Spider-Man right now who was in our “Civil War” film and is in “Spider-Man: Homecoming,” and the audience has embraced it. And you can look to Sherlock Holmes, James Bond, and Batman as characters that last longer than any one actor playing them. There’s a precedent for it in other franchises that suggests it’s possible. But right now I don’t want to think about it and don’t need to think about it.

“Spider-Man: Homecoming” is backed by Sony but produced by Marvel. How will that change this version of “Spider-Man”?
It takes place inside the cinematic universe that we have built across 14 films. In the previous films, Spider-Man was the only superhero who existed in that world. In the comic books, Spider-Man always existed in a world where the Avengers existed, and Iron Man existed, and the Hulk would run through the streets, and Captain America had been thawed out of the ice. In the film, he’s a young kid who has to be home at curfew so his Aunt May doesn’t get worried, and go to school, and do his homework. That’s in contrast to Tony Stark’s life or Stephen Strange’s.

Fox controls the film rights to “The X-Men” and “The Fantastic Four.” Could you partner with them on a movie as you did with Sony?
It’s an impossibility at this juncture. We certainly have enough films to keep us busy for a number of lifetimes.

There are more comic-book movies being made, with DC trying to develop its own cinematic universe. Are you worried about the competition?
What other people are adapting from the comics medium, I watch with as much interest as I do any other movies. Because I’m a fan, and I want to see what other people are doing in the world.

I’ve always believed in expanding the definition of what a Marvel Studios movie could be. We try to keep audiences coming back in greater numbers by doing the unexpected and not simply following a pattern or a mold or a formula.

There’s a lot of discussion of inclusion in the business. Do you believe Marvel has a role to play in creating opportunities for people of color, women, and other groups?
Absolutely. The comics have always been progressive. They’ve showcased all sorts of different cultures and ethnicities. And we want to stay true to that. When you look at “Black Panther” — when you look at “Captain Marvel,” which will be Brie Larson in the title role — it is a very important thing for us to have diversity both in front of the camera and behind the camera.

Is finding a female director for “Captain Marvel” a priority?
It is. Having a female director at the helm to tell the story of a woman who is also our most powerful hero by far is very important to us.

What makes her so powerful?
If you had the collector cards of the Marvel characters and you could see the power levels, she would be off the charts compared to anyone that we’ve previously introduced in a film.

Why was Brie Larson the right fit?
With Captain Marvel, who has powers that approach a level that we haven’t seen before in our films, you need to counter- balance that by finding somebody who is also very human and very relatable and can get into a groove with the audience, where they’re willing to see her fly through the sun and punch a moon away from a spacecraft. At the same time, we need her to land and have relatable flaws.

Brie is a person you’re going to want to go on this journey with, just like Benedict or Robert or Chris Pratt.

You’ve had a string of hits Do you ever greenlight a film about a character that may be interesting but isn’t well-known, and get seized by anxiety that the audience won’t show up?
I feel anxiety about every scene and every character in every movie we’ve ever made. That’s why when you sit down for your first test screening, you’re nauseated. It would be hubris to think people are going to love everything you put in front of them.

Why Delete Uber?

Yes I deleted Uber. But I think it helps to understand *why* you should consider it.

It’s not because their CEO “backed the Muslim ban”. It’s because he ignored the request from the NYC taxi union to participate in a few hours of protest; Uber drivers were basically “breaking a picket line” rather than showing some brief solidarity. And the CEO’s tepid press release afterwards read like a non-apology – that they were concerned for their *employees* who might be affected by the ban, but not everyone else? His stance was infuriatingly unclear.

It’s also not because the CEO is “on Trump’s board”. Tesla’s Elon Musk and Disney’s Bob Iger are on that board too – which strikes me more like a “keep your enemies closer” strategy than anything. Uber’s CEO may very well support Trump – but his being on that board doesn’t “prove” that, or else we should boycott Tesla & Disney too.

And yes, it’s great that Lyft is showing their beliefs through financial support of the ACLU. I’ve always preferred Lyft anyway, because they treat their drivers better (and have a tipping option!).

Uber has always been a bit questionable (and often outright slimy) with their business practices. To me, the refusal to protest was simply the final nail.

BREAKING (NOT SO SURPRISING) NEWS!

Olaf was seen talking to Bob Iger earlier this week about replacing Mickey’s spot as the official “mouse-scot” of the company. Bob thinks it will increase revenue and more attraction to the Disney company. Mickey has run his course, Bob implied. He’s been with us for so long, it’s time to ~let him go~. 

Olaf gave no comment but giggled when asked about it. 

xoxo gossiprincess

“We’re deeply saddened by the loss of Robin Williams, a wonderfully gifted man who touched our hearts and never failed to make us laugh. An incredible actor and a comedic genius, Robin will always be remembered for bringing some of the world’s favorite characters to life, from his zany alien on ABC’s Mork & Mindy to the irascible genie in Disney’s Aladdin. He was a true Disney Legend, a beloved member of our family, and he will be sorely missed. We join Robin’s friends and fans everywhere in mourning, and offer our thoughts and condolences to his family during this difficult time.

- Robert A. Iger, chairman and chief executive officer, The Walt Disney Company.”