boarding schools

Story time: I went to boarding school and one day my dad sent me a letter and told me to open it in the dining hall so I was like ??? maybe he sent something for my friends too. So I take it to dinner and open it, and it turns out it’s a card. A record-your-voice card in which my dad recorded himself yelling at the top of his lungs about how my dog pooped on the carpet. And that is the story of how my dad sent me a Howler one day.

SIX Transgender Americans Were Elected in 2017! 🇺🇸



🗳️ Danica Roem ( Virginia - House of Delegates )

🗳️ Gerri Cannon ( New Hampshire - School Board of Somersworth )

🗳️ Andrea Jenkins ( Minnesota - City Council of Minneapolis )

🗳️ Stephe Koontz ( Georgia - City Council of Doraville )

🗳️ Lisa Middleton ( California - City Council of Palm Springs )

🗳️ Tyler Titus ( Pennsylvania - School Board of Erie )


Way to go voters! Congratulations to everyone elected! You have rekindled hope!

Hey Everyone! When I was younger, I used to read a ton. As a direct result of that, my writing and reading were on point. Recently, however, I haven’t been reading as much, and as a result, my writing isn’t as good as I want it to be (albeit, still pretty good). I’ve decided to read all the books on this list over the next 1 and a half years to get back into reading and to improve my writing. Enjoy! :)

1. To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee

2. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

3. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

4. Animal Farm by George Orwell

5. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë

6. The Catcher in the Rye by JD Salinger

7. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

8. Macbeth by William Shakespeare

9. Lord of the Flies by William Golding

10. Hamlet by William Shakespeare

11. Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

12. The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne

13. Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare

14. A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens

15. The Ecological Rift by John Bellamy Foster, Brett Clark, Richard York

16. This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs The Climate by Naomi Klein

17. Catch-22 by Joseph Heller

18. The Crucible by Arthur Miller

19. The Odyssey by Homer

20. The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane

21. Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë

22. Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut

23. Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe

24. The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer 

25. The Stranger by Albert Camus

26. Frankenstein by Mary Shelly

27. The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck

28. Beowulf by Unknown

29. The Systems View of Life: A Unifying Vision by Fritjof Capra, Luigi Luisi

30. All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque

31. A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare

32. Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad

33. Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson

34. The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams 

35. Faust: First Part by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

36. Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

37. The Awakening by Kate Chopin

38. Candide by Voltaire

39. The Color Purple by Alice Walker

40. The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka

41. Oedipus Rex by Sophocles

42. Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe

43. Steppenwolf by Hermann Hesse

44. One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

45. The Bell Jar by Slyvia Plath

46. The Call of the Wild by Jack London

47. Walden by Henry David Thoreau

48. Antigone by Sophocles

49. Things Fall Apart (The African Trilogy, #1) by Chinua Achebe

50. Gulliver’s Travels by Jonathan Swift

51. The Last of the Mohicans (The Leatherstocking Tales #2) by James Fenimore Cooper

52. Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert

53. Beloved by Toni Morrison

54. Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray

55. Selected Tales by Edgar Allen Poe

56. Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

57. 1984 by George Orwell

58. Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes 

59. The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner

60. One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel García Márquez

61. The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde

62. A Good Man is Hard to Find and Other Stories by Flannery O’Connor

63. Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw

64. As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner

65. Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison

66. The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas

67. A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen

68. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass by Frederick Douglass

69. Tess of the D’Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy

70. A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway

71. A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce

72. Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett

73. Moby-Dick; or, The Whale by Herman Melville

74. The Iliad by Homer

75. Inferno (The Divine Comedy #1) by Dante Alighieri

76. Babbitt by Sinclair Lewis

77. An American Tragedy by Theodore Dreiser 

78. The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling by Henry Fielding

79. Long Day’s Journey into Night by Eugene O’Neill

80. War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy

81. Cyrano de Bergac by Edmond Rostand

82. The Hunchback of Notre-Dame by Victor Hugo

83. The Mill on the Floss by George Elliot

84. The Cherry Orchard by Anton Chekhov

85. Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston

86. Bartleby the Scrivener by Herman Melville

87. Doctor Zhivago by Boris Pasternak

88. The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton

89. Selected Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson

90. Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman

91. The Good Soldier by Ford Madox Ford

92. Call it Sleep by Henry Roth

93. Fathers and Sons by Ivan Turgenev

94. The Portrait of a Lady by Henry James

95. The Adventures of Augie March by Saul Bellow

96. A Death in the Family by James Agee

97. The Turn of the Screw by Henry James

98. The Magic Mountain by Thomas Mann

99. Go Tell It on the Mountain by James Baldwin

100. Death Comes for the Archbishop by Willa Carther

101. To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf

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cloudy afternoon studyblr mood board for @thechemistrynerd (if you want one just ask!)

Photo credits (from R to L, top to bottom): @eatsleep-study, @holocrams, @liberalartssociety, @introvertedbookworm24@studyingbysunset, @studyrose

If you’d like me to take your picture down let me know :)

Today’s highlights in my ongoing project to read through and transcribe the letters of Rachel (a wealthy Victorian girl at boarding school on the East Coast in the 1890s) include…

  • Rachel’s cousin Will and his Yale roommate Allen both have the measles. Rachel shows limited sympathy (”Poor boy!”), before immediately mocking them and calling them “childish” for getting a disease only little kids get.
  • Rachel and her roommate “B” (It stands for Bertha!) attempted to steal a sign (what sort idk) from a fair they went to but found they “were carefully guarded”. She wishes Will could have been there to help.
  • Will has a crush on a girl named Jenny, who Rachel knows, and is constantly asking Rachel if Jenny has mentioned him.
  • “B” often sits next to Rachel as she writes and suggests things to add to the letter or just generally distracts her.
  • Will and Jack, who are brothers, don’t write to each other. They write to Rachel and tell her to write to the other and pass on a message for them. Rachel keeps asking why they do this, but goes along with it anyways.
  • Rachel always explains why there are ink blots or areas of sloppy writing in her letters. Explanations so far include such classics as: the dinner bell just rang, it’s after lights-out and I’m writing this in the dark, “B” is shaking my arm, “B” is kissing me, this pen is broken, the postman is almost here, and there was a bee.
  • For her 18th birthday Rachel received: a new Kodak camera, eighteen white rosebuds, silver manicure scissors, a pair of shell side combs, a silver pencil, and a vase of pink roses. However her favorite present was from her father who wrote to say she could just buy her own present and he would pay for it.
  • Rachel is always mentioning the pictures she takes with her Kodak. I wish I knew what happened to them. 
  • In addition to Calvé, Marlowe and Sothern, Rachel has now also gone to see performances by Ellen Terry, Henry Irving, John Philip Sousa, Ignacy Jan Paderewski (playing the piano, not governing Poland), and freaking Sarah Bernhardt! 
  • Rachel likes to put question marks in the middle of sentences to denote sarcasm; i.e. “I am very ? sorry for you.” and “Men were not excluded and we had the pleasure ? of meeting several.”
  • Your 1890s slang word of the day: “squelch” (verb) - to be lectured or punished for something. Example: “I expect to be squelched unmercifully by mama and papa.”  Can also be used as a noun as in: “This term we have had nothing but squelches.”

tough-teddy-deactivated20170303  asked:

Hi, I'm creating a comic where troubled, low income teens are given the option to go to a boarding school, in North California, to train to become monster hunters. The school is mostly populated by minorities mostly African American, Native Americans, South East Asians, and Latinx. A friend of mine said it might be seen as problematic to have Native Americans be in a government own boarding school. This worries me since my main character is a Native American boy whom loves the school.

Native Character in Monster-Hunter Boarding School; Poor implications? 

So, yes, it could be a very tricky thing to have Native Americans in the school. But it all boils down to two questions:

  1. Is it consensual in the most genuine sense of the term?
  2. Do they become part of a new culture, or do they keep their old one and add to it?

The residential school system was not consensual even when there weren’t laws in place forcing kids to go. Parents could and did send their children there because they thought it was for the best, because they were coerced into it, or because they had developed the type of fondness you develop for your abuser where you try to replicate the pattern because you haven’t healed from it yet.
If the kids are told in very informed ways what happens to their lives— who they have contact with, whether or not their culture has to change (a big red flag would be no room to carry on cultural beliefs or, in the case of Natives, reconnect with their cultural beliefs), how their lives would get better and worse.

If, however, the kids are caught in moments of desperation, where it’s basically “come with us or else”, then there would be major problems with the validity of that consent. If the kids are doing okay but looking for a way out, that’s one thing, but if the school reps dive in at a bad point when all hope seems lost, I would feel very uncomfortable.

Next, you have to give him options to practice and explore his culture. The pain of the residential school system was because it was an active attempt at destroying our culture. So if you have it that your character is still Native, keeps what traditions he can, and is allowed to go back into his community/family without problem, then you’ve mollified the forced assimilation undertones to the school.

you should have minimal problems with the government run boarding school. If you want a general list of what to avoid in the school to make it not be a residential school, Canada published the Truth and Reconciliation Commission describing the country’s use of the system and the abuse that happened within. The possibility exists you’ll trigger people regardless (it is a very fresh trauma in our communities), but by making it consensual and having connections to his culture, you’ll at least minimize the negative impact. Check out [Braving Native American Diversity] and [Researching Native American Cultures] for tips on how to make him have a culture.

~ Mod Lesya

5

Voltron Aesthetic: St Trinian’s Boarding School AU

We are the best
So screw the rest
We do as we damn well please
Until the end
St Trinian’s
Defenders of Anarchy

Featuring:Headboy!Shiro, Rudeboy!Lance, Poshtotty!Keith, Geek!Pidge and Indie!Hunk.
Every first year student at the boarding school of Hell will learn the same six things within the first week:
  • Headboy Kuro Shirogane is the real authority around here.
  • If an upperclassman offers you any sum of money for finding out Headmistress Altea’s age, do not accept. Repeat. Do not accept.
  • Lance McClain is banned from anything containing more than 5% alcohol pass it on.
  • Keith Kogane’s heels provide a twenty second warning to get the hell out the way or be crushed by six-inch stilettos.
  • One should avoid pissing off Pidge Gunderson if one values one’s wifi access.
  • In Hunk Garrett we trust.
To All the Students in School

I think this really needs to be said to all the high schoolers freaking out about AP exams, SAT scores, and ACT scores. Hell, even to those who are applying/applied to colleges or other things. The number that you end up reading off the collegeboard site does not determine your worth. The number that you end up reading off the collegeboard site does not determine how smart you are. The number that you end up reading off the collegeboard site does not determine your future. Only you, as a person, can determine that. I know it’s hard, I’m still in high school too. But I think you guys need to, have to, know that even if you get all A’s and a 1450+ (or 2200+) on the SAT that it doesn’t automatically guarantee you a job. You could end up going to Stanford, MIT, or Harvard but end up in a bad place. The school you end up going to doesn’t necessarily grant you a job either. Okay, yes, it makes it a little bit easier but either way, you’re going to have to work hard for everything to get where you want. All of you are so much more important than some score or letter grade. Y’all are gonna do great, as long as you have the passion and drive to work for it. Having straight A’s and perfect scores does not mean you will survive in the real world. Now, this isn’t a way to make you feel better or myself (since I’m not a straight A student either) about all of this because honestly it’s all so true.

Good luck on your AP exams and everything else though. :) You guys got this.

3

Friday 22nd May 2015 : 12:43pm 

Study Leave has begun! I had my last day of lessons yesterday, which marks the beginning of exams for me! 18 days until my first A2 exam ( A level Music ). 

Studying Shostakovich’s 5th symphony at my desk in my room on my boarding house at school. Got a long day ahead of me with lots of studying to be done! 

I hope everyone’s exams are going well! Good luck and stay healthy! x