blue star bar

The spectacular new camera installed on NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope during Servicing Mission 4 in May has delivered the most detailed view of star birth in the graceful, curving arms of the nearby spiral galaxy M83.

Nicknamed the Southern Pinwheel, M83 is undergoing more rapid star formation than our own Milky Way galaxy, especially in its nucleus. The sharp “eye” of the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) has captured hundreds of young star clusters, ancient swarms of globular star clusters, and hundreds of thousands of individual stars, mostly blue supergiants and red supergiants.

The image, taken in August 2009, provides a close-up view of the myriad stars near the galaxy’s core, the bright whitish region at far right.

WFC3’s broad wavelength range, from ultraviolet to near-infrared, reveals stars at different stages of evolution, allowing astronomers to dissect the galaxy’s star-formation history.

The image reveals in unprecedented detail the current rapid rate of star birth in this famous “grand design” spiral galaxy. The newest generations of stars are forming largely in clusters on the edges of the dark dust lanes, the backbone of the spiral arms. These fledgling stars, only a few million years old, are bursting out of their dusty cocoons and producing bubbles of reddish glowing hydrogen gas.

The excavated regions give a colorful “Swiss cheese” appearance to the spiral arm. Gradually, the young stars’ fierce winds (streams of charged particles) blow away the gas, revealing bright blue star clusters. These stars are about 1 million to 10 million years old. The older populations of stars are not as blue.

A bar of stars, gas, and dust slicing across the core of the galaxy may be instigating most of the star birth in the galaxy’s core. The bar funnels material to the galaxy’s center, where the most active star formation is taking place. The brightest star clusters reside along an arc near the core.

The remains of about 60 supernova blasts, the deaths of massive stars, can be seen in the image, five times more than known previously in this region. WFC3 identified the remnants of exploded stars. By studying these remnants, astronomers can better understand the nature of the progenitor stars, which are responsible for the creation and dispersal of most of the galaxy’s heavy elements.

M83, located in the Southern Hemisphere, is often compared to M51, dubbed the Whirlpool galaxy, in the Northern Hemisphere. Located 15 million light-years away in the constellation Hydra, M83 is two times closer to Earth than M51.

Object Name: M83

Image Type: Astronomical

Credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

Acknowledgment: R. O'Connell (University of Virginia) and the Wide Field Camera 3 Science Oversight Committee

Time And Space

The Signs and their Bubble Bar companions
  • Capricorn: Rose Jam Bubbleroon
  • Aquarius: Blue Skies and Fluffy White Clouds
  • Pisces: Dorothy
  • Aries: Sunny Side
  • Taurus: Yuzu and Cocoa Bubbleroon
  • Gemini: Pop in the Bath
  • Cancer: Creamy Candy
  • Leo: Bright Side
  • Virgo: Amandopando
  • Libra: French Kiss
  • Scorpio: Karma
  • Sagittarius: The Comforter

Okay all the stuff about Jim getting into fist fights at the Academy and Bones coming to patch him up is A+ but like

What about Bones?  We’ve seen that he’s a totally high-strung drunk and has that Southern flavor of irascibleness, and yeah he’s a doctor but that doesn’t make him a pacifist.  I mean, “Would you like to see how fast I can put you in a hospital?

So just imagine Bones going out with Jim and getting drunk and slurry and drawling, and some jackass makes some sneering comment about him being a “hick” and Bones is out of his seat faster'n a bell clapper in a goose’s ass yelling, “Say that to my face you city-slickin’ jackass!” with Jim trying to hold him back and being like, “Bones, Bones no, c'mon this is the third time this month!” and when they stagger out later with Jim holding Bones up with bruised faces and bloody knuckles Bones is just chortling “We sure showed them, kid” and Jim just mutters “Yeah, sure.”

Or Bones punching some guy out after he was harassing a girl on the street and he sits and lets Jim run the regen over his fingers while holding his side and wincing but he just looks sooooo pleased with himself.

Or someone insulting Jim, saying that he’s only at the Academy on his dad’s name or that he’s clearly fucking his way to the top and Jim doesn’t even have time to grab the back of Bones’s collar before he’s on top of the guy.  Jim later muttering something asking about the Hippocratic Oath and Bones just snorting (and wincing) and saying the Oath technically doesn’t allow surgery either and you can’t expect him to keep up with all that.

And Bones staggering into Jim’s room at ass o'clock in the morning on the second anniversary of his divorce, drunk off his ass and eyes red-rimmed (or at least the one that isn’t currently turning purple and green), nose bloody and a cut on his cheekbone.  Jim blearily letting him in and settling back on his bed and lifting an arm for Bones to curl under and close his eyes and definitely not cry, dammit as he takes tissues and wipes the blood off his face.

Leonard Horatio McCoy, with the golden heart and the steadiest hands on the ship, but mess with someone he cares about or be a bully and god help you he will fuck your shit up.  (◡‿◡✿)

Nicknamed the Southern Pinwheel, M83 is undergoing more rapid star formation than our own Milky Way galaxy, especially in its nucleus. The sharp “eye” of the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) has captured hundreds of young star clusters, ancient swarms of globular star clusters, and hundreds of thousands of individual stars, mostly blue supergiants and red supergiants.

WFC3’s broad wavelength range, from ultraviolet to near-infrared, reveals stars at different stages of evolution, allowing astronomers to dissect the galaxy’s star-formation history.

The image reveals in unprecedented detail the current rapid rate of star birth in this famous “grand design” spiral galaxy. The newest generations of stars are forming largely in clusters on the edges of the dark dust lanes, the backbone of the spiral arms. These fledgling stars, only a few million years old, are bursting out of their dusty cocoons and producing bubbles of reddish glowing hydrogen gas.

The excavated regions give a colorful “Swiss cheese” appearance to the spiral arm. Gradually, the young stars’ fierce winds (streams of charged particles) blow away the gas, revealing bright blue star clusters. These stars are about 1 million to 10 million years old. The older populations of stars are not as blue.

A bar of stars, gas, and dust slicing across the core of the galaxy may be instigating most of the star birth in the galaxy’s core. The bar funnels material to the galaxy’s center, where the most active star formation is taking place. The brightest star clusters reside along an arc near the core.

The remains of about 60 supernova blasts, the deaths of massive stars, can be seen in the image, five times more than known previously in this region. WFC3 identified the remnants of exploded stars. By studying these remnants, astronomers can better understand the nature of the progenitor stars, which are responsible for the creation and dispersal of most of the galaxy’s heavy elements.

M83, located in the Southern Hemisphere, is often compared to M51, dubbed the Whirlpool galaxy, in the Northern Hemisphere. Located 15 million light-years away in the constellation Hydra, M83 is two times closer to Earth than M51.

Object Name: M83

Image Type: Astronomical

Credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA), R. O'Connell (University of Virginia) and the Wide Field Camera 3 Science Oversight Committee

Time And Space

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Lovin the “oh-oh’s” a LOT- and the rest too!