block-printing

Block Printing | Everything Golden

Long time readers will know how much I love block printing. I think it’s the carving that I enjoy the most - it’s so rewarding seeing your design ‘come to life’ and seeing it printed onto fabric or paper. This DIY is to make napkins but you can print onto anything - you could even block print a repeat pattern onto a plain quilt cover! If you’re not sure about what to design, do a search on google and get inspired. You just might find a new passion!

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Block Printing

A long time ago we learned our first lesson about block printing with linocut at school. Now we spotted Derrick Castle, designer and typographer from Nashville, Tennessee, USA. Living in Nashville, he has been exposed to mixology and more modern interpretations of classic cocktails through friends that he has in the bartending industry. To pay tribute to some of his favorite classic cocktails he started with this series of block prints you can see above. As a city were music is born and celebrated every day he dedicated some works also to this soundful center of the south. Enjoy his work!

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Talismanic Scroll

Egypt, 11th century

Contains ayat al-kursi, among other verses and invocations.

Centuries before block printing was introduced in Europe, the technique was used in the Islamic world to produce miniature texts consisting of prayers, incantations, and Qur'anic verses that were kept in amulet boxes. The text on this amulet is in the angular kufic script. The six-pointed star, a familiar symbol in Islamic art, is usually called “Solomon’s seal.”

Metropolitan Museum of Art 

Block printing at the Morris & Co Merton Abbey workshop. England. © William Morris Gallery 

As the business continued to grow, in 1881 Morris opened a factory. The space allowed him to print his famous patterns on a much larger scale. The continuous thump of the woodblocks was one of the most characteristic sounds of Merton Abbey.