blinding people

3

Life from the perspective of colour blind people 

Deuteranomalia: This is caused by reduced sensitivity to green light. Deutan color vision deficiencies are by far the most common forms of color blindness. This subtype of red-green color blindness is found in about 6% of the male population, mostly in its mild form deuteranomaly.

Protanopia: Caused by a reduced sensitivity to red light due to either defective or a lack of long -wavelength cones (red cones). Some scientists estimate that being a protan is associated with a risk of a road accident equivalent to having a blood alcohol level of between 0.05 and 0.08 per cent.

Tritanopia:  People affected by tritan color blindness confuse blue with green and yellow with violet.  This is due to a defective short-wavelength cone (blue cone). Whilst  Protanopia and Deuteranomalia are significantly more common in men, tritanopia affects both sexes in equal amounts.

Monochromacy: Only around 0.00003% of the world’s population suffers from total color blindness, where everything is seen in black and white. 

Always keep a squad of non-biased genuine people. People who are quick to correct your wrongs, but also expose shit that you're emotionally blind to. Overall, keep people around you who have your best interests at heart. You'll always be safe.

OK so I know people were saying Jensen was super drunk during the JIB8 cockles panel, and at first I thought so too - because otherwise WTF was that all about?? But honestly the more I think about it (and I was there) the more I honestly think he really wasn’t all that drunk?

He’d drank A LOT more the day before, during his J2 panel (IIRC) but I honestly didn’t see him drink a lot on Sunday, and if you recall he’d had that emotional YANA moment mere hours before the cockles panel (he actually referred to this moment - but didn’t go into detail about it - during his M&G the same day which I also attended).

I really don’t think he would’ve drunk a lot after that moment….So honestly, IMHO, what we saw on stage there was more JENSEN than NESNEJ…Just a really hyper Jensen in a super flirty and jokey mood. He’d been in a really good mood / top form all two days of the con so it wasn’t out of place for him to act like that during the cockles panel, too.

Which makes that entire panel all the more unbelievable…Pray4misha

Love Square Songs

Ladrien)

Romantic Marichat)

Platonic Marichat (Talking about their crushes, of course)

Adrienette)

Personal Ladynoir)

Just a thought that wouldn’t leave me at 4:00 in the morning.

Okay unpopular opinion time.

As somebody who knows a blind-from-birth person, it’s kinda pissing me off that people are acting like the Doctor going blind is tragic. It might suck for him for awhile because he’s not used to living that way, but ffs if he’s taught how to do things the blind way as opposed to the sighted way and borrowed other people to be his eyes when vision is necessary then not much would have to change.

If the Doctor can memorize a map in a few seconds, I doubt it’d take him long to learn just about every form of Braille or raised reading material for blind people all over the universe.

Imagine if the TARDIS made him a sonic white cane that could do all the cool stuff his sonic screwdriver could do and more. Imagine it having a “homing” signal where the cane will gently tug him back to the TARDIS if there’s danger or if he gets ‘lost’ on an adventure. (And imagine him having to resist it and be all “be quiet, you!”)

Disability doesn’t have to be tragic, y’all.

–posted by an autistic person who headcanons the Doctor as autistic.

I hate edgy culture, this is a real article about a real *14 year old* girl being shot in the head, she’s paralyzed and partially blind, and people are laughing reacting or “thankful” reacting to it on Facebook. 

Male violence against women is so common, that we find this funny. A young girl has gone from wanting to spend her summer horseback riding and because of two boys instead her goal is to move her fingers, and we’re acting like it’s a joke. Why do we, as a culture, hate women so much? 

(here’s the actual article if you wanted to read the story)

10 things for those writing about people who are blind/have low vision...

So…finishing up my portfolio and I just thought I’d share a few things:

1. Person first language: people who are blind/ people who have low vision/ people who are visually impaired.

2. It’s a cane… not a stick

Side note: Please have your characters be safe travelers and use canes or guides some of the time, not just super powers all of the time. It’s hard enough for some young kids to use their canes without comparing themselves to Kanan Jarrus or Daredevil…

3.You don’t get super senses… but maybe you become more aware of what you’re sensing and differentiating what you’re sensing

4. As far as I’m aware and according to people I’ve talked to…touching faces is awkward and not effective

5. People who are congenitally blind may not turn to look at who’s talking because it is a learned skill that may need to be explicitly taught to them. However, people who become blind/lose their vision later in life may still turn to face who’s talking or face things that they are focusing on regardless of whether they can see it

6. Some people turn their heads at angles or appear to be looking away from you because they only have vision in that part of their eye that’s currently facing you. They can’t see you if they look straight on.

7. When you can see, you learn things whole-to-part. You, who are sighted, see a house, you think house. Then you learn door, window, roof, chimney, shutters etc. If you can’t see, you learn part-to-whole, and you need to rely on touch/hearing/smell/taste (when appropriate) to form a concept of something you might learn like this: door, smell of home, window glass, window frame, brick of a chimney, panels on side of the house etc. But then putting in all together as a house is difficult to conceptualize if you’re going off random pieces of the puzzle. You may need a tactile model or something to fill in the gaps if it’s something you’ve never seen and can’t touch in its entirety.

8. Cane stuff: Not everyone taps their cane when they use it. Most that I’ve been with don’t or if they do, they do not use it all the time. Think about it. You miss a lot of tactile feedback and there’s a greater risk of missing things to trip on. There are three types of formal cane techniques: two-point touch (the classic tapping side to side), constant contact, and verification technique. The first two the cane is held at the center of the body and the person moves it from side to side wide enough just so that it goes past their hips. As they move it to one side, their opposite foot steps forward. This gives someone the most protection when moving. Verification technique is when the person holds the cane low in their non-dominant hand and uses constant contact as they see possible obstacles/terrain changes in their path.

9. Counting steps is a myth. People don’t take even steps generally. Sometimes it’s easy to count doors if it’s a small number. But if you’re at school and you have to travel across the building, are you really going to count 20 doors? What if you bump into something and lose count? You’d have to start all over. Most people create landmarks for locations. It could be something like the door with the only bulletin board in the hallway. Or the door with the water fountain next to it. Or the door that is one door to the left directly across  from the water fountain. Another thing here, is that you can kind of feel when you’re getting close to somewhere you’ve traveled to before. Like when you’re driving home and you feel like it’s been a while and your turn should be here, when suddenly the turn is here! That’s called time-distance estimation.

10. Most people are not totally blind. Only 2% of the population is visually impaired and only 2% of the population that is visually impaired is totally blind no light perception. This means that most people who are blind/visually impaired/have low vision can see something, and everyone is different and reacts different to their visual impairment and how they use the vision they have. 

This got long and slightly ranty, which was an accident… but I hope someone finds it useful. And now that I have this off my chest, remember creative liberty is a thing :)

anonymous asked:

okay but ive been wondering this for like 2 years (since they cancelled the inhumans movie): why do x-men stans want inhumans to fail?

  • FOX claimed the sole movie rights to X-men back in the 2000′s
  • Marvel starts making successful movies of there own a bit later
  • Marvel now wants those movie rights to the X-men back
  • Fox is like nah
  • Comics aren’t very profitable anymore
  • movies are VERY profitable
  • marvel starts aligning their comics with the movies, hoping they will sell more that way, thinking movie-goers will want to go out and buy the comics
  • X-men comics are best sellers and have like 15 titles
  • wait a minute
  • Free advertising for movies we didn’t make?  
  • We’re generating hype for FOX?? 
  • Aw hell no
  • Tank the x-men comics. Just like. Extinct them or something. Kill off their leader. Cut down on titles. Slowly but gradually we’ll make them less relevant.
  • ….but we DO have the movie right to the inhumans tho….
  • But sir, hardly any one knows of the inhumans, they’re pretty obscure to general audiences-
  • -look, If we can make the guardians of the galaxy a hit, we can do anything
  • Marvel starts pushing the Inhumans in comics while shoving X-men titles in a broom cupboard on the basement level of Marvel inc
  • ….while changing the core message of these inhumans comics to one of ‘Survival against prejudice’ ‘Normal people are now waking up with inhuman powers and learning to cope with them’ while ‘trying to fit in with the human race and other super powered factions’
  • so like
  • They’re the new x-men who ARENT the x-men
  • p much