blechman

2

Tigerstripe Camouflage

Of all the camouflage patterns, tigerstripe is probably the most instantly recognizable and visually attractive design there is. Produced in South-East Asia during the Vietnam war in a variety of versions, it was initially issued to US Army Special Forces troops who valued its functionality and concealment properties in jungle environments, and regarded it as a kind of status symbol.

Later, tigerstripe suits became available from local tailor shops, and were privately purchased by other personnel – pilots, reporters, photographers etc – as a distinctive and fashionable alternative to the standard olive-green uniform. Tigerstripe has also gained notoriety in popular culture, being worn by Dennis Hopper’s photojournalist character in Apocalypse Now, and on stage by Joe Strummer.

Tigerstripe Zig Zag

US Army Special forces recruited tribal villagers to assist them in the more inhospitable regions of South Vietnam, and issued them with tigerstripe uniforms. One of the rarest and most interesting patterns has been christened the Zig Zag pattern, because of the way the background colours move diagonally across the horizontal black stripes. Legend has it that it also includes a phallic symbol as a sign of bravado for the ethnic tribesmen.

Maharishi Reproduction Tigerstripe Zig Zag

Nowadays, it is extremely hard to find original tigerstripe garments, and even harder for those of a larger build to find wearable sizes, as the majority were manufactured in small Asian size ranges. Maharishi have faithfully reproduced one of the rarest and most desirable tigerstripes, the Zig Zag pattern, in authentic colours, fabric and cut and incorporated the phallic symbol found in the original pattern.

Specific styles of cut associated with this pattern are the two pocket shirt with straight cuffs, pants with two thigh pockets and boonie hat with foliage loops around the crown. These authentic reproductions are a limited edition of 500 sets only worldwide, and have never been reproduced before. Whilst nobody would doubt Blechman’s camouflage knowledge is bordering the perverse in its depth, he has acknowledged the still deeper artist and re-enactor Neil Holdom as the inspiration and resident expert for this project.

Maharishi SS/2008

http://maharishistore.com/wordpress/

Letters to a young illustrator

I like very much R.O. Blechman . I just finished “Letters to a young illustrator” and I really recommend this book for illustrators and students of illustration. He talks about life, art and an honest approach to the illustration path.

“I think it’s such a disservice to the public that galleries and museums display only artist’s successes , but never their failures . There should be a Museum of Failed Art. It would exhibit all the terrible art that would have ended up in trash bins and garbage cans, lost and unknown to the public. My museum would give a true picture of the artist’s live, and provide much consolation to fellow artists”

6

Max Allan Collins, Quarry

Quarry, Quarry’s List, Quarry’s Deal, Quarry’s Cut, Quarry’s Vote: 2015 Hard Case Crime reissues of the five first Quarry novels with covers by Robert McGinnis.

Quarry in the Black: the twefth Quarry novel, due October 2016, cover by Laurel Blechman and the late Glen Orbik.

See the six original Hard Case Crime Quarry paperbacks there.

youtube

Hardy Blechman on Norman Wilkinson’s WWI ‘Damdazzle’ camouflage

http://dpm-studio.com/

www.maharishistore.com 

     Once again, the obituary of another creative giant has sent me spinning back through time and into my archives. This week Hermann Zapf, arguably the world’s greatest type designer, died in Germany at the age of 96. Creator of some of the world’s most famous and enduring typefaces, his work is subliminally etched into the minds of hundreds of millions of people worldwide. His Optima face is etched into both the Vietnam memorial in Washington and the 911 memorial in New York. His Palatino face ships with Microsoft Word and his sweeping calligraphic face Zapfino ships with every Mac. He was the reigning giant of a world that few outside the graphic arts industry knew, but his influence is felt everywhere the printed word occurs.

      Like most of the world, when I shot my first job for the International Typeface Corporation, I was pretty oblivious to type design. I had been obsessively studying the work of all the great photographers, but had paid scant attention to how their work was being used in print and the type that surrounded them.

    That all changed sometime around 1980 when I was hired to photograph Herb Lubalin for the ITC. I can’t remember how the job came my way, but it was a life changer. Herb Lubalin, along with Aaron Burns and Ed Rondthaler, had founded the ITC in 1970, and was himself, a huge presence in the type and graphic design world. He had designed the famous PBS logo that’s still in use, as well as the ground breaking typeface Avant Garde. He had also been responsible for the creation and design of the seminal type and graphic arts magazine known as U+lc (Upper and lower case). I shot him first in the converted fire station that was his studio, and again not long before his death in 1981.

     From that point on I became a regular presence at the ITC, shooting their gallery shows and openings, features for U+lc and all manner of special projects. The gallery and the regular shows  there became a magnet for all the great talents of the New York graphics world and I met and photographed many of them over the years : The great cartoonist Lou Myers, the illustrators R.O. Blechman and Seymour Chwast, type designers like Ed Benguiat, Matt Carter and Herman Zapf, and even the royal scribe, Donald Jackson. I was young, and these guys were huge in their fields, and a huge influence on me as well. With the influence of the ITC, type for me was no longer just a field of letters that surrounded my photographs, but an integral part of every design I looked at for the next 35 years.

    Ironically, Matt Carter now lives in my neighborhood and I run into him regularly. A 2010 MacArthur “genius” Grant winner and a major player in the typography world, he was quoted in the N.Y. Times after Herman Zapf’s death:  “Last Thursday, all of us moved up one. That’s my way of saying Herman was on top.”

      A few from that period; mostly 1980′s……

youtube

Vintage Alka Seltzer ad by illustrator R.O. Blechman, who is being honored with the 25th annual Masters Series Award and exhibition at SVA. Exhibition up from October 2nd – November 2nd at the SVA Chelsea Gallery; reception next Thursday, October 3rd.

Announcing the Guests of Honor at the 2016 MoCCA Arts Festival

The Society of Illustrators is proud to share this year’s stellar list of Guests of Honor for the MoCCA Arts Festival in New York City. They are: 

* Cece Bell, author of the phenomenal middle grade graphic memoir El Deafo (winner of the Newberry Honor and an Eisner Award) 

* R.O. Blechman, Emmy Award-winning illustrator, animator, cartoonist and author.

* Phoebe Gloeckner, whose subversive classic The Diary of a Teenage Girl was recently adapted into a critically acclaimed film of the same name.

* Sonny Liew, whose graphic novel The Art of Charlie Chan Hock Chye was censured by the National Arts Council of Singapore and is forthcoming from Pantheon Books.

* Rebecca Sugar, creator of the quietly radical animated cartoon series Steven Universe.

This diverse group of artists exemplifies the limiteless aesthetic and social power of comics and cartooning. The MoCCA Arts Festival will take place on April 2 - 3rd from 11:00AM - 6:00PM at our brand new location at Metropolitan West (636 W. 46th St.) with programming mere steps away at Ink48 (653 11th Ave.).

Price of admission is $5 per day and will grant attendees access to the Fest including the Exhibitors Hall, on-site Gallery space, and programming. Tickets will be available for purchase at the door. Children under twelve are free. Further scheduling information regarding our Guests of Honor will be available in future announcements.

ABOUT THE GUESTS OF HONOR

Cece Bell
Children’s book author and illustrator Cece Bell attended the College of William and Mary where she studied Art History, and later attended Kent State University, earning a graduate degree in illustration and design. Her colorful, fun and quirky drawings can be found in her best-selling books Rabbit & Robot: The Sleepover, Crankee Doodle, Bug Patrol, Itty Bitty, Bee-Wigged, and the Sock Monkey series. In 2015, Bell received the Newberry Medal Honor for her graphic novel El Deafo, a story based on her own experiences growing up deaf.

R.O. Blechman
R.O. Blechman is a multiple award-winning and influential animator, illustrator, children’s book author, graphic novelist and editorial cartoonist. His many books include the groudbreaking 1953 graphic novel The Juggler of Our Lady and the forthcoming Amadeo & Maladeo: A Musical Duet. His work in animation includes The Soldier’s Tale and unforgettable advertisements for products like Alka Seltzer. He has received multiple recognitions including a Lifetime Achievement Award from The National Cartoonists Society in 2011, was inducted into the Society of Illustrators’ Hall of Fame in 2012. His work has been shown at The Norman Rockwell Museum, The School of Visual Arts, and MoMA.

Phoebe Gloeckner
Phoebe Gloeckner began cartooning after moving to San Francisco in the 1970s, and was greatly influenced by the underground comix movement led by artists including Robert Crumb, Aline Kominksy, Bill Griffith, Diane Noomin, and Terry Zwigoff. Her early work appeared in anthologies including Wimmen’s Comix, Weirdo, and Twisted Sisters. Both her 1998 collection A Child’s Life and Other Stories and the 2002 novel The Diary of a Teenage Girl: An Account in Words and Pictures received notable recognition as well as controversy for its honest portrayal of teenage sexuality with themes of drug use and childhood traumas. The book has been adapted into a theatrical production and a critically acclaimed feature film of the same name. She is the recipient of the 2000 Inkpot Award, received the Guggenheim Fellowship in 2008, and is currently the Faculty Fellow at the University of Michigan Institute for the Humanities.

Sonny Liew
Sonny Liew is a comics artist, painter, and illustrator whose work includes the New York Times best seller The Shadow Hero (with Gene Yang), Doctor Fate (with Paul Levitz), Malinky Robot and titles for Marvel Comics, DC Vertigo, and Image Comics. He has been nominated for multiple Eisner Awards for his collaborations on The Shadow Hero, Wonderland, and Liquid City, a multivolume comics anthology featuring creators from Southeast Asia. He lives and works in Singapore.

Rebecca Sugar
Animator, composer and director Rebecca Sugar’s groundbreaking career started as a writer and storyboard artist on the animated television series Adventure Time. She later went on to create the Cartoon Network series Steven Universe, and became the first woman to independently create a series for that network. She has received numerous Emmy and Annie Award nominations for her work on both series.

About the Society of Illustrators and the Museum of Comic and Cartoon Art (MoCCA)
Founded in 1901, the Society of Illustrators is the oldest nonprofit organization dedicated to the art of illustration in America. Notable Society members have been N.C. Wyeth, Rube Goldberg, and Norman Rockwell, among many others. Our Museum of Illustration was established in 1981. We offer year-round themed exhibits, art education programs and annual juried competitions. Our Permanent Collection houses 2,500 pieces that are cataloged for scholarly use and displayed periodically. In 2012, we created the MoCCA Gallery with a focus on curated exhibits of comic and cartoon art.

The MoCCA Arts Festival is a 2-day multimedia event, Manhattan’s largest independent comics, cartoon and animation festival, drawing over 7,000 attendees each year. With 400 exhibiting artists displaying their work, award-winning honorees speaking about their careers and artistic processes
and other featured artists conducting workshops, lectures and film screenings, our Festival mission accelerates the advancement of the Society’s broader mission to serve as Manhattan’s singular cultural institution promoting all genres of illustration through exhibitions, programs and art education.

Pourquoi Faire l'amour sort 2 ans après ? Le réalisateur Djinn Carrenard répond

AlloCiné : Le film a été présenté à Cannes en 2014 et il sort en ce mois de février 2016. S'il n'est pas inhabituel qu'il y ait un délai entre la présentation en festival et la sortie publique, l'écart est particulièrement grand dans ce cas. Pourquoi a-t-il fallu attendre tant de temps avant de voir FLA ?

Djinn Carrenard : Salomé Blechmans et moi-même avons pris du temps afin de remonter le film, nous avons organisé des projection-test, laissé décanter les images, nous avons demandé l'avis de collègues réalisateurs, remis toutes les scènes du film au mur. Ce temps a été nécessaire afin d'arriver à une version avec laquelle nous étions définitivement en accord.

Quel a été votre état d'esprit durant ces deux années pendant lesquelles le film existait sans vraiment exister ?

Ce n'était pas véritablement deux années, le film a été présenté en mai 2014, il devait sortir en novembre 2014 avec un précédent distributeur, et puis finalement nous avons décidé de le sortir nous-mêmes début 2015. Pendant cette année j'étais très concentré sur le film, et puis je pensais aussi à mes futurs projets. Je pourrais dire que j'étais dans un état d'esprit de transition, car Donoma et Faire l'amour sont un diptyque expérimental, un nouveau cinéma s'ouvre pour moi dorénavant.

“Donoma" et "Faire l'amour" sont un diptyque expérimental, un nouveau cinéma s'ouvre pour moi dorénavant.

Si je me réfère aux informations à l'époque de Cannes et celles fournies pour la sortie, la durée du film est passée de 2h45 à 1h59. Là encore, un "remontage” de film après une projection en festival n'est pas exceptionnel. Mais là les coupes semblent importantes. Quelles ont été les motivations pour des changements aussi drastiques ?

J'aime bien expérimenter au cinéma. Pour Donoma, par exemple, j'avais fait 4 versions successives du film, la 4ème version avait été faite 2 jours avant la sortie en salles, alors même que le film avait déjà été visionné par la presse, qui l'avait aimé. Sur Donoma, j'avais été plus drastique, car j'avais même ajouté de nouveaux personnages entre les versions. J'ai été dans le même état d'esprit pour Faire l'amour : travailler mon oeuvre jusqu'à être complètement en accord avec ce que j'amène au public.

A quel point le film est différent de celui présenté à Cannes ?

Très différent. Il est plus concis, plus efficace, on y comprend aussi mieux mes intentions en tant que réalisateur. Je me suis rendu compte qu'il fallait sûrement être plus bref et didactique avec cette inhabituelle histoire d'amour qui met en scène un rappeur. J'ai décidé d'accompagner un peu plus mon public afin qu'il ne se perde pas dans cette vision pessimiste et urbaine de l'amour.

La nouvelle version de Faire l'amour est très différente, plus concise, plus efficace.

Après le succès (médiatique et critique) de “Donoma”, tourné en mode “guérilla”, “FLA” creusait ce même sillon, farouchement indépendant. Est-ce que vous pensez que, compte tenu de l'évolution de la distribution, des films de ce genre ont encore de l'avenir en salles ?

Je pense que, tôt ou tard, le cinéma effectuera sa révolution numérique. Comme dans l'univers des réseaux sociaux, des VTC ou des locations de logement, je crois qu'il arrivera des protagonistes modernes qui créeront un nouveau modèle qui bousculera tout le système tel que nous le connaissons. L'avenir en salles des films “guérilla" (ndlr : des films faits avec une logique de production beaucoup plus libre que le cinéma "traditionnel”) ne fait que commencer, car ils participent à la démocratisation du cinéma, cet univers tellement fermé que tellement de personnes veulent et doivent pénétrer.

Est-ce que l'avenir de ces films passe par un autre mode de diffusion ou de distribution ? Via le e-cinéma ou la SVOD par exemple ?

A l'heure actuelle, certains films sortent directement en DVD, cela ne dépend pas de leur budget ou de la façon dont ils ont été produits, mais de l'intérêt que l'on prête au public pour ces films. Je crois que Toy Story 2, par exemple, devait sortir directement en DVD. Ce sera la même chose pour les films “guérilla”. De plus en plus de films seront créés, une promotion de plus en plus efficace sera mise sur pieds afin qu'ils atteignent leur public. A ce moment, il se produira un effet de décantation, certains films ne sortiront pas en salles, parmi eux il y aura des films “guérilla” et d'autres non.

Tôt ou tard le cinéma effectuera sa révolution numérique.

Quel est votre prochain projet ?

Mon prochain projet c'est FYMO, une communauté qui promeut l'ouverture d'esprit. Je vais commencer par faire des courts métrages au sein de cette communauté, et par la suite tout ce que je créerai se fera dans le cadre de cette communauté.

“Faire  l'amour” sort en salles ce mercredi 3 février…

«Faire l’amour»: Comment l'équipe de «Donoma» assure la sortie de son nouveau film
DO IT YOURSELF - Le succès de « Donoma » a encouragé Djinn Carrenard et Salomé Blechmans a sortir eux-même leur deuxième film, « Faire l’amour », dans les salles, dès ce mardi 2 février… Avec Donoma (2011), l'équipe du réalisateur Djinn Carrenard avait réussi un pari fou : réaliser un film en toute indépendance pour 150 euros de budget et le faire connaître grâce aux réseaux sociaux. En mai 2014, son nouveau film coproduit par Arte, Canal+ et le CNC, Faire l'amour est toujours entièrement autoproduit, mais fait l'ouverture de la Semaine de la Critique de Cannes, en dépit de sa durée : 2h45. « La version qui a été montrée à Cannes était la première », explique Salomé Blechmans, cadreuse, directrice artistique, monteuse, coauteur et coproductrice. (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src=“//connect.facebook.net/fr_FR/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.3”; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);}(document, ‘script’, 'facebook-jssdk’)); << A relire : « FLA » à Cannes, ou comment faire l'amour sur la Croisette Un an et demi pour finir le film « Nous avons mis un an et demi à monter, remonter, peaufiner le film à l'aide de projections test », précise Salomé Blechmans. Ce mardi, FLA rencontrera le public dans une version d'1h59. « Une fois que le film a été terminé, nous avons décidé de suivre notre logique à fond en le distribuant nous-même. Ce n'était pas une réaction antisystème mais une envie de mieux connaître ce domaine de la sortie. Nos méthodes de promotion ne sont pas classiques », insiste Salomé Blechmans. Toute l'équipe s'est investie pour « créer une communauté autour de FLA ». Parmi leurs idées, faire circuler une bande-annonce fleuve de 11 minutes où un chauffeur de Uber parisien raconte le film Faire l'amour à ses clients. « On compte reproduire l'expérience à Marseille », (…) Lire la suite sur 20minutes.fr

«La terre et l’ombre»: Une pluie de cendre dans un champ de Colombie
«Steve Jobs»: Comment Danny Boyle a réussi à rendre attachant un homme odieux
«Point Break»: Pourquoi les fans vont détester le remake
«Anomalisa»: Charlie Kaufman ose les marionnettes pour adultes
Téléchargez gratuitement l'application Android 20 Minutes
The New Old Masters
External image
External image
External image
External image
External image
External image

In Erik Madigan Heck’s series “Old Masters,” the photographer creates portraits of people in their 80s and 90s who are still “at the top of their game.” Commissioned by The New York Times Magazine, the series features 15 men and women, including actors Betty White and Christopher Plummer, filmmaker Frederick Wiseman, architect Frank Gehry and jazz musician Roy Haynes, among others, photographed in different locations over the course of just one week.

Over the years, Heck has developed a distinct “contemporary-romantic” style, and identifies himself as a “painter who uses photography.” His influences are evident in the series, from the baroque lighting of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg to the painterly landscape in which he photographs illustrator R.O. Blechman.

Accompanied by an essay by Lewis H. Lapham and interviews conducted by Camille Sweeney, Heck’s portraits capture his subjects in their natural environments. 81 year old long-distance runner Ginette Bedard, for instance, is photographed in athletic wear near her home in Howard Beach, Queens, while 85 year old naturalist and author Edward O. Wilson studies pine needles at Walden Pond in Massachusetts. It’s not everyday that one gets to work with such renowned legends, let alone 15 of them. “It was the most rewarding experience I’ve ever had with photography,” says Heck.

“Old Masters” was recognized in the Magazine/Editorial category in the 2015 PDN Photo Annual. The 2016 PDN Photo Annual is currently open for submissions, with an extended deadline of February 24. Please visit the website for more information.

Related Stories:

Erik Madigan Heck: Cathedrals

Love Your Elders

How to Get the Best from Portrait Subjects: Photojournalist Pieter Ten Hoopen (For PDN Subscribers only; login required)



from PDN Photo of the Day http://ift.tt/1Q3yp7H
«Faire l’amour»: Comment l'équipe de «Donoma» assure la sortie de son nouveau film

DO IT YOURSELF - Le succès de « Donoma » a encouragé Djinn Carrenard et Salomé Blechmans a sortir eux-même leur deuxième film, « Faire l’amour », dans les salles, dès ce mardi 2 février… Avec Donoma (2011), l'équipe du réalisateur Djinn Carrenard avait réussi un pari fou : réaliser un film en toute indépendance pour 150 euros de budget et le faire connaître grâce aux réseaux sociaux. En mai 2014, son nouveau film autoproduit, Faire l'amour est toujours entièrement autoproduit, mais fait l'ouverture de la Semaine de la Critique de Cannes, en dépit de sa durée : 2h45. « La version qui a été montrée à Cannes était la première », explique Salomé Blechmans, cadreuse, directrice artistique, monteuse, coauteur et coproductrice. (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src=“//connect.facebook.net/fr_FR/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.3”; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);}(document, ‘script’, 'facebook-jssdk’)); << A relire : « FLA » à Cannes, ou comment faire l'amour sur la Croisette Un an et demi pour finir le film « Nous avons mis un an et demi à monter, remonter, peaufiner le film à l'aide de projections test », précise Salomé Blechmans. Ce mardi, FLA rencontrera le public dans une version d'1h59. « Une fois que le film a été terminé, nous avons décidé de suivre notre logique à fond en le distribuant nous-même. Ce n'était pas une réaction antisystème mais une envie de mieux connaître ce domaine de la sortie. Nos méthodes de promotion ne sont pas classiques », insiste Salomé Blechmans. Toute l'équipe s'est investie pour « créer une communauté autour de FLA ». Parmi leurs idées, faire circuler une bande-annonce fleuve de 11 minutes où un chauffeur de Uber parisien raconte le film Faire l'amour à ses clients. « On compte reproduire l'expérience à Marseille », insiste (…) Lire la suite sur 20minutes.fr

VIDEO. Secrets de tournage: «Anomalisa», «Chocolat» et «Steve Jobs»
Omar Sy: «A la Belle Epoque, on trouvait normal de traiter le clown Chocolat de singe»
«Dofus»: Ankama réussit son passage au long-métrage
Le réalisateur de «Mad Max» George Miller présidera le Festival de Cannes
Téléchargez gratuitement l'application iPhone 20 Minutes