blazed orange

Symbolisms:

Sansa - Apple:

The apple symbolism is very rich and interesting. Indeed, it is found in many religions, popular cultures and legends. Apples can symbolize good (love and beauty), but also evil (sin, temptation and discord) through the famous name of “forbidden fruit”.

Cersei - Pomegranate:

The pomegranate fruit has been used throughout history and in virtually every religion as a symbol of humanity’s central beliefs and ideals, namely, life and death, rebirth and eternal life, fertility and marriage, and abundance.

Dany - Orange Rose:

With their blazing hidden power, orange roses are the embodiment of desire and enthusiasm. Orange roses often symbolize passion and excitement and are an expression of fervent romance.

Jon - White Rose:

White roses represent innocence and purity and are traditionally associated with marriages and new beginnings. The white rose is also a symbol of honor and reverence, and white rose arrangements are often used as an expression of Innocence, Purity, Secrecy, remembrance.

Arya - Ranunculus:

Also known as Buttercup and Coyote’s Eyes, legend has it that the mythological Coyote was tossing his eyes up in the air and catching them when Eagle snatched them. Unable to see, Coyote created eyes from the buttercup. In the language of flowers, a bouquet of ranunculus says, “I am dazzled by your charms.”

Tyrion - Peony:

The peony is significant both historically and mythological, and thus is tied to many different meanings and symbols. Common peony meanings include romance, prosperity, good fortune, a happy marriage, riches, honor, and compassion — but peonies can also mean bashfulness.

https://www.reddit.com/r/freefolk/comments/6k7tjm/maisie_williams_time_magazine_2017/djk6esu/

“Sweet love, Sweet lines, Sweet life!”

-Shakespeare


“I wanted ye from the first I saw ye—but I loved ye when you wept in my arms and let me comfort you, that first time at Leoch.”



I undressed slowly, standing by the bed, looking down at him. He had turned onto his side and curled himself up against the cold. His lashes lay long and curving against his cheek; they were a deep auburn, nearly black at the tips, but a pale blond near the roots. It gave him an oddly innocent air, despite the long, straight nose and the firm lines of mouth and chin. 

 Clad in my chemise, I slid into bed behind him, snuggling against the wide, warm back in its woolen nightshirt. He stirred a little, coughing, and I put a hand on the curve of his hip to soothe him. He shifted, curling further and thrusting himself back against me with a small exhalation of awareness. I put my arm around his waist, my hand brushing the soft mass of his testicles. I could rouse him, I knew, sleepy as he was; it took very little to bring him standing, no more than a few firm strokes of my fingers. I didn’t want to disturb his rest, though, and contented myself with gently patting his belly. He reached back a large hand and clumsily patted my thigh in return.

 “I love you,“ he muttered, half-awake.

 “I know,” I said, and fell asleep at once, holding him.” 


 “I didna think I should ever laugh again in a woman’s bed, Sassenach,” he said. “Or even come to a woman, save as a brute, blind with need.” A note of bitterness came into his voice. 

I lifted his hand, and kissed the small scar on the back of it. “I can’t see you as a brute,” I said. I meant it lightly, but his face softened as he looked at me, and he answered seriously. 

“I know that, Sassenach. And it is that ye canna see me so that gives me hope. For I am—and know it—and yet perhaps…” He trailed off, watching me intently. “You have that—the strength. Ye have it, and your soul as well. So perhaps my own may be saved.”


 “It’s a wonderful gift. However did you find it?” He smiled then, in return. The sun blazed low, a brilliant orange ball glimpsed briefly through dark treetops. 

“I’d seen the box when I went to the goldsmith’s shop—it was the goldsmith’s wife who’d kept it. Then I went back yesterday, meaning to buy ye a bit of jewelry—maybe a brooch—and whilst the goodwife was showing me the gauds, we happened to speak of this and that, and she told me of the Doctor, and—” He shrugged. 

“Why did you want to buy me jewelry?” I looked at him, puzzled. The sale of the ruby had left us with a bit of money, but extravagance was not at all like him, and under the circumstances— “Oh! To make up for sending all that money to Laoghaire? I didn’t mind; I said I didn’t.” He had—with some reluctance—arranged to send the bulk of the proceeds from the sale of the stone to Scotland, in payment of a promise made to Laoghaire MacKenzie—damn her eyes—Fraser, whom he had married at his sister’s persuasion while under the rather logical impression that if I was not dead, I was at least not coming back. My apparent resurrection from the dead had caused any amount of complications, Laoghaire not least among them. 

“Aye, ye said so,” he said, openly cynical. 

“I meant it—more or less,” I said, and laughed. “You couldn’t very well let the beastly woman starve to death, appealing as the idea is.” 

He smiled, faintly. “No. I shouldna like to have that on my conscience; there’s enough without. But that’s not why I wished to buy ye a present.” 

“Why, then?” The box was heavy; a gracious, substantial, satisfying weight across my legs, its wood a delight under my hands. He turned his head to look full at me, then, his hair fire-struck with the setting sun, face dark in silhouette.

 “Twenty-four years ago today, I married ye, Sassenach,” he said softly. “I hope ye willna have cause yet to regret it.” 


Yet what he felt now was not lust—not quite. Nor was it even the need of her, the wanting of soul’s company. He wished to cover her with his body, possess her—for if he could do that, he could pretend to himself that she was safe. Covering her so, joined in one body, he might protect her. Or so he felt, even knowing how senseless the feeling was. 

 He had stiffened, his body tensing involuntarily with his thoughts. Claire stirred, and reached back with one hand. She laid it on his leg, let it lie for a moment, then reached gently farther up, in drowsy question. He bent his head, put his lips behind her ear. Said what he was thinking, without thought. 

“Nothing will harm ye while there is breath in my body, a nighean donn. Nothing.” 

 “I know,” she said. Her limbs went slowly slack, her breathing eased, and the soft round of her belly swelled under his palm as she melted into sleep


 “It’s a great comfort,” he said at last, “to see the sun come up and go down. When I dwelt in the cave, when I was in prison, it gave me hope, to see the light come and go, and know that the world went about its business.” He was looking out the window, toward the blue distance where the sky darkened toward infinity. His throat moved a little as he swallowed. 

“It gives me the same feeling, Sassenach,” he said, “to hear ye rustling about in your surgery, rattling things and swearin’ to yourself.” He turned his head, then, to look at me, and his eyes held the depths of the coming night. 

“If ye were no longer there—or somewhere—” he said very softly, “then the sun would no longer come up or go down.” 


 He turned and reached up his hands, and she leaned to him, tried to climb down, but lost her footing and half-fell, landing in his arms in a fluster of clothes and loose hair. He laughed and turned her round to look, but kept his arms around her. 

He was loath to surrender the warmth of her and held her like a shield against cold memory. She was still, leaning back against him, only her head moving as she looked from one end of the cave to the other. It was barely eight feet long, but the far end was lost in shadow. She lifted her chin, seeing the soft black stains that coated the rock to one side by the entrance. 

“That’s where my fire was—when I dared have one.” His voice sounded strange, small and muffled, and he cleared his throat.

 “Where was your bed?” 

“Just there by your left foot.” 

“Did you sleep with your head at this end?” She tapped her foot on the graveled dirt of the floor. 

“Aye. I could see the stars, if the night was clear. I turned the other way if it rained.” She heard the smile in smile in his voice and put her hand along his thigh, squeezing. 

“I hoped that,” she said, her own voice a little choked. “When we learned about the Dunbonnet, and the cave… I thought about you, alone here—and I hoped you could see the stars at night.” 

“I could,” he whispered, and bent his head to put his lips to her hair. The shawl she’d pulled over her head had slipped off, and her hair smelled of lemon balm and what she said was catmint. She made a small hmp noise in her throat and folded her own arms over his, warming him through his shirt. 

“I feel as though I’ve seen it before,” she said, sounding a little surprised. “Though I suppose one cave probably looks a good deal like any other cave, unless you have stalactites hanging from the ceiling or mammoths painted on the walls.” 

“I’ve never had a talent for decoration,” he said, and she hmp’ed again, amused. “As for being here … ye’ve been here many nights wi’ me, Sassenach. You and the wee lass, both.”


“Are ye no coming to bed, Sassenach?” Jamie was already lying down, having found a remote corner behind the bar counter and spread out our cloaks. 

“I’ve broken a fingernail trying to get this bloody thing loose, and I can’t bloody reach it with my teeth!” I said, on the verge of breaking into tears of frustration. I was swaying with weariness, but couldn’t bring myself to sleep in the clammy confines of my stays. Jamie reached up an arm out of the darkness, beckoning. 

“Come lie down wi’ me, Sassenach,” he whispered. “I’ll do it.” The simple relief of lying down, after twelve hours in the saddle, was so exquisite that I nearly changed my mind about sleeping in my stays, but he’d meant it. He squirmed down and bent his head to nuzzle at my laces, an arm round my back to steady me.” “Dinna fash,” he murmured into my midsection, voice somewhat muffled. “If I canna nibble it loose, I’ll prise it wi’ my dirk.” He looked up with an inquiring noise, as I’d uttered a strangled laugh at the prospect. 

“Just trying to decide whether being accidentally disemboweled would be worse than sleeping in my stays,” I whispered, cupping his head. It was warm, the soft hair at his nape damp to the touch.

 “My aim’s no that bad, Sassenach,” he said, pausing in his labors for an instant. “I’d only risk stabbin’ ye in the heart.” As it was, he accomplished his goal without recourse to weapons, gently jerking the knot loose with his teeth until he could finish the job with his fingers, opening the heavy seamed canvas stays like a clamshell to expose the whiteness of my shift.

 I sighed like a grateful mollusk opening at high tide, plucking the fabric out of the creases the stays had made in my flesh. Jamie pushed away the discarded stays but remained where he was, his face near my breasts, rubbing his hands gently over my sides. I sighed again at his touch; he’d done it by habit, but it was a habit I’d missed for the last four months, and a touch I’d thought never to feel again. 

“Ye’re too thin, Sassenach,” he whispered. “I can feel every rib. I’ll find ye food tomorrow.” I had been too much preoccupied in the last few days to think about food, and was much too tired at the moment to be hungry, but made an agreeable sound in response and stroked his hair, tracing the curve of his skull.

 “I love you, a nighean,” he said, very softly, his breath warm on my skin.

 “I love you,” I answered just as softly, taking the ribbon from his hair and loosening his plait between my fingers. I pressed his head closer to me, not in invitation, but out of the sudden urgent need to keep him close to me, to protect him. He kissed my breast and turned his head, laying it in the hollow of my shoulder. He took one deep breath, one more, and then was asleep, the relaxing weight of his body against me both protection and trust.

“I love you,” I said, almost soundless, my arms wrapped tight about him. “Oh, dear God, I love you.”

Outlander Books “Sweetest Moments” As Requested by Anonymous

4

The Toy Water Guns of Entertech

Entertech was a subsidiary company of LJN, most popularly (or infamously) known for making low quality video games for the Nintendo Entertainment System, many of which were based on popular movies in the 1980′s. While LJN is known for their video games, in actuality most of their business came from the production and distribution of toys.  During the 1980′s, they made several lines of action figures and many other toys that were very popular, making LJN a powerhouse in the toy industry.

In 1985, the company MCA Inc bought out LJN, which gave LJN the power to buyout smaller toy companies and create several subsidiary companies.  One of these companies was Entertech, founded shortly after the MCA buyout.  Entertech invented and produced a line of children’s water guns that went above and beyond the water gun technology of the day. Rather than just being your typical squirt gun, Entertech’s guns used a battery powered motor to pump and fire the war.  In addition, Entertech’s guns used detachable magazine’s filled with water, making loading realistic to a real firearm. With the electric pump, the toy guns could fire fully automatic, with a rate of around 60 squirts per minute with a range of around 30 feet. Several models were produced, made to resemble common military firearms such as assault rifles, submachine guns, machine pistols, rocket launchers, grenade launchers,shotguns, and pistols.

Entertech’s slogan was “The look! The feel! The sound, so real!” Problem was, the guns did look very real, especially with it’s matte black finish. In a few incidents, teenagers toting the toy guns were shot by police who mistook them for the real thing. Some other incidents occurred in which robbers armed with the water guns robbed stores and banks. As a result, states and local governments passed laws banning toy guns that looked like real firearms, mandating they were finished in bright colors or had an orange barrel cap so that they could stand out.  Entertech attempted to remedy the situation by finishing their water guns in different colors, or with blaze orange caps. However by then, the damage had been done. Entertechs sales decreased by 79%.

In 1990 Acclaim Entertainment purchased LJN, and decided to reduce LJN to video game production and distribution only. As a result, Entertech was sold in September of 1990, and eventually dissolved. LJN’s run as video game produced was short, as Nintendo only authorized licensed game developers to produce five games a year. LJN was eventually folded into Acclaim in 1995, and thus LJN ceased production of crappy NES game. Inexplicably, Acclaim produced a game with the LJN name brand in 2003, called Spirit of Speed 1937. It was the last LJN title.