blaschka

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7 Science Illustrators You Should Know

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I went to Boston this weekend to visit my best friend @yogalady and while I was there I took the opportunity to have my MIND BLOWN by the Blaschka Glass Flowers at the Harvard Museum of Natural History.
ALL OF THESE FLOWERS ARE 100% GLASS!!!
Produced on a foot bellow powered Bunsen burner in the 1870’s by just two incredible flame-workers!
They are so intricate, realistic and perfect I thought my little glass worker heart was going to explode! As a nature inspired flame-worker it felt practically a like a religious pilgrimage. I still can’t even believe my eyes just looking at the pictures I took! It was a fantastic highlight to an all around perfect trip!
Prepare to be spammed by more pictures of awesome things in Boston!

We think of glass as a stable material, but it can deteriorate. Droplets, such as those seen in this close-up of a hollow glass element from a Blaschka sea jelly, are an early sign of atmospheric glass deterioration, a process in which moisture from the air leaches out alkalis (sodium and potassium) from the glass creating microscopic voids and can eventually cause the glass to fall apart. The severity of the deterioration is determined by the glass composition and the humidity it is exposed to. The deterioration can’t be stopped, but we can slow it down by controlling the environment and by periodically cleaning the glass. 

Check out the amazing 360° view our photography department captured of one of the Blaschka models in the Fragile Legacy exhibition. 


Blaschka Nr. 232 

Chrysaora mediterranea (1885) 


All models in the Fragile Legacy exhibition were crafted by Leopold Blaschka and his son, Rudolf, in Dresden, Germany. Cornell purchased 570 Blaschka models in 1885; this model is on loan from Cornell University, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. #corningmuseumofglass #cmog #glass #glassmaking #blaschka2016 #gif

In honor of Black History Month, we’re highlighting works in our collection by African American artists. As the recipient of the 2007 Rakow Commission, Debora Moore created Host-IX Epidendrum, a star orchid inspired by the work of Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka. 

Debora Moore, Host-IX Epidendrum, Seattle, Washington, United States, 2007. 22nd Rakow Commission. 2007.4.70.

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LEOPOLD BLASCHKA AND RUDOLF BLASCHKA: DRAWINGS FOR GLASS MODELS OF MARINE INVERTEBRATES

Although many people have either heard about or visited the Harvard collection of glass flowers, few are familiar with their creators, the father and son model makers, Leopold (1822-1895) and Rudolf (1857-1939) Blaschka. Fewer still know about the Blaschkas’ models of soft-bodied undersea creatures - marine invertebrates - which they made in their lampworking studio in Dresden, Germany and shipped to universities and museums worldwide.

source- The Corning Museum of Glass

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Here’s a neat little video I found on the Blaschka models put out by the Natural History Museum (in London).