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#BlackHistoryMonth 2014

CultureHISTORY: The Civil Rights Movement

They were everyday people who became warriors for justice. They did it to give themselves and their families a better life and they did it for us. Those future generations seemingly so far off in the distance. For us they endured the lynchings, the beatings, the rapes, the murders, the attacks, the daily humiliations. For us.

Today, it is on their shoulders we stand. #NeverForget

1. The American South

2. KKK flyer (Citizens Council) - New Orleans chapter

3.  New York City - Miles Davis, 32, was arrested after fighting with a patrolman who had ordered him to move from a crowded sidewalk. Davis was hit on the head with a blackjack for which an ambulance had to be called. (1959)

4. 1951 - Southeast Maids with their employers children. Photo by John Vachon, LOOK magazine series “The South”

5. Segregated bus in Texas c. 1950s

6. March on Washington, 1963

7. Civil rights protest, New York, 1964

8. Memphis, TN Sanitation Strike, 1968

9. A young activist teaching a woman to read and write so that she could vote, Virginia 1960. Photo by Eve Arnold

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#BlackHistoryMonth 2014

CultureSOUL: *The Graduates* Post- Reconstruction Era - The African Americans

1. Fisk University Graduates including W.E.B. Dubois (right), 1888

2. Class from Roger Williams University in Nashville - 1899

3. Howard Univ. graduating class c. 1900

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CultureSOUL: Vintage African Americans – 1940s-1960s – Photos by Charles “Teenie” Harris

Mr. Harris was a Pittsburgh native who became one of the most prominent African American photographers in the first half of the 20th century. His vast body of work includes photographs of jazz musicians, negro league baseball players and mid-century African Americans. More on his work here.   All photos courtesy of Carnegie Museum of Art.

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#BlackHistoryMonth 2014
CultureSOUL - The Carl Van Vechten Photography series  Van Vechten was a writer, photographer and patron of the arts in New York. He was said to be moved by the artists of the Harlem Renaissance movement and in 1939 he began a photography series that would last for nearly 25 years. Van Vechten, who became friendly with many of the artists, began photographing them in a bold color series. Some 50 years later, this series still stands as one of the finest photo essays on mid-century black artists available. A few highlights from the series here.
Credits: 1. Eartha Kitt / 2. Harry Belafonte / 3. Ruby Dee / 4. Ossie Davis 5. Langston Hughes / 6. Zora Neal Hurston / 7. Pearl Bailey 8. James Earl Jones / 9. W.E.B. Dubois / 10. Mahalia Jackson
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CultureSOUL: “Civil Rights: Segregation” - Greenville, SC

From the landmark 1956 LIFE magazine series photographed by world-famous photographer Margaret Bourke-White. Some gorgeous color photos of families, kids and a little Saturday night partyin’ at the local juke joint.

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CultureHISTORY: The Obamas & Black History

  1. First Lady Michelle Obama at the Brown vs. Board of Education Museum, Topeka, Kansas, July 2014
  2. President Barack Obama on the Rosa Parks bus at the Henry Ford, Dearborn, Michigan, April 2012

We are living during historic times. The Obamas are changing and reclaiming black history right before our very eyes. The passage of time will only serve to elevate their legacies so, as we move through this momentous era with America’s First Black Family, be present for the journey. Future generations will ask us about Obama as we asked our elders about MLK, Malcolm and JFK. They will ask us what it felt like to live in the Age of Obama. Be a witness to history.

 

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CultureVIDEO *Soul Train Line Dance* - “Daddy Could Swear” - Gladys Knight & The Pips c. 1973

Black folks in the 70s. Feeling free and gettin’ down. You’re welcome. 

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#BlackHistoryMonth 2014

CultureDANCE: Lauren Anderson

“Honey, I’m a chick that loves to dance. I’m not one of your little frail, anorexic ballerinas. I’m an athlete.”

Ms. Anderson is an American ballet dancer and a former principal dancer with the Houston Ballet. In 1990, she was the first African American ballerina to become a principal for a major dance company.