blackfolk

gurl.com
Why Does Being Weird And Black Make Me White? | Gurl.com

But as much as I love to bond with other black girls who were told that they act white based on shallow, uneducated observations, there’s nothing empowering in thinking, “Oh my God I’m so different than other black girls.” It’s easy to fall into that trap, but it’s really obnoxious and erases the fact that you aren’t alone. You don’t dress differently than other black girls as a whole because there are plenty of black girls who dress just like you. There are preppy black chicks, goth black chicks, trendy black chicks, punky black chicks, hip-hop inspired black chicks and everything in between! The problem isn’t that we don’t dress like other black girls. The problem is that most people haven’t gotten the message that we’re not a monolith.

File this under “things I wish people had told me in high school”.

Let me put my 2 cents in on this Sharkiesha foolishness.

First of all, I logged onto this dreadful World Star Hip Hop to see what this Sharkiesha bullshit was all about and I figured it’d be a waste of my fucking time.

Sharkiesha and her little army of ratchet skanks all need to be arrested and thrown in juvie for a very long time. She’s a dumb bitch for punching/kicking her friend over a dude that was probably ugly as shit and not even worth it.

Her friends are dumb as hell for standing around and watching.

Sharkiesha is a common basic bitch and a bully. Her friends are bullies. They’re all WEAK. Anyone who finds this shit funny needs to re-evaluate their lives because this shit has got to stop, young black America. SMFH

folklife.si.edu
Five on the Black Hand Side: Origins and Evolutions of the Dap | TALK STORY
Five on the Black Hand Side is a project exploring gestural languages that were born in African American communities during the 1960s and 1970s, including the “the dap” and the black power handshake. When we see youths, athletes, or even President Obama giving a fist bump or dap, we think of the

Five on the Black Hand Side is a project exploring gestural languages that were born in African American communities during the 1960s and 1970s, including the “the dap” and the black power handshake. When we see youths, athletes, or even President Obama giving a fist bump or dap, we think of the