black-indian

Edmonia Lewis (1844-1907)

Edmonia Lewis was a sculptor of African-American, Haitian, and Ojibwe descent who achieved fame for her use of the neoclassical style to depict subjects significant to her heritage. She was wildly successful during her lifetime and was even asked by former president Ulysses S. Grant to do his portrait in 1877. Some of her most famous pieces include Forever Free, Hagar, and Old Arrowmaker and His Daughter.

The Root: Black, Red and Proud

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Radmilla Cody’s crowning as Miss Navajo Nation in 1997 triggered an outcry and a conversation about what it means to be Native American. Now she’s featured in a museum exhibit showing the rarely told history of African-Native Americans.

Cynthia Gordy | February 22, 2011

Radmilla Cody’s crowning as Miss Navajo Nation in 1997 triggered an outcry and a conversation about what it means to be Native American. Now she’s featured in a museum exhibit showing the rarely told history of African-Native Americans.

In a 1920 edition of the Journal of Negro History, Carter G. Woodson observed, “One of the longest unwritten chapters in the history of the United States is that treating of the relations of the Negroes and the Indians.”

“Red/Black: Related Through History,” a new exhibit at Indianapolis’ Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art, illuminates this rarely told story. Since the first arrival of enslaved Africans in North America, the relationships between African Americans and Native Americans have encompassed alliances and adversaries, as well as the indivisible blending of customs and culture.

“It’s not received a lot of attention because it’s not the dominant culture’s story, although it’s very important to the dominant culture’s bigger view of the past,” says James Nottage, curator of the exhibit, which includes narratives of enslaved blacks who traveled the Trail of Tears with their Native owners; slaves who intermarried into Native tribes as an escape from bondage; and the largely African-featured members of the Shinnecock tribe of New York, as well as shared traditions in food, dress and music.

Radmilla Cody, 35, a Native American Music Award-winning singer and anti-do

mestic violence activist, is also featured in the exhibit. The daughter of a Navajo mother and an African-American father, Cody was raised by her grandmother in the Arizona Navajo community, initially speaking only the Navajo language. In 1997 she was crowned Miss Navajo Nation, sparking controversy from some members who refused to accept her.

As one disapproving letter to the editor of the Navajo Times put it, “Miss Cody’s appearance and physical characteristics are clearly black, and thus are representative of another race of people. It appears that those judges who selected Miss Cody have problems with their own sense of identity.”

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The original people, whom the white race found here (red people), were the brothers of the black man, they are referred to as the Red Indians.

Columbus was a half-original man and was born in Italywhich is South-East Europe. His full name was Christopher Columbus and the place he discovered was North America. He found the Indians here…They are Original People - The Hon Elijah Muhammad

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#NativeAmericanIndian
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Honoring Violet Sky, at Thunder Bay #Powwow
Northern Cheyenne, Saponi & African heritage #Multiracial #Native #Biracial

“The most important thing to me is to teach the children, so that our culture never dies.” –Blackhawk SanCarlos, Mohawk & Apache

Violet Sky is a lovely dancer and a star student in school. A beautiful child to be proud of! Thank youJana Curley for allowing us to feature your youngest daughter with such a beautiful name. Just saying her name out loud brings a smile.

Photo by Jamie Bananish

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