black-girls

I am a white person who lives in quite possibly the whitest place in America. Seriously, the population statistics say it’s 95 percent white. So I know how white people are. I know how clueless we are to the struggles of POC. It frustrates me to no end to hear the constant micro aggressions and sometimes blatant racist statements that come out of the mouths of almost everyone I know. It’s why I’m moving. I’m very aware of what is happening all over the country but I hoped that the world out there was a little better. That more racial diversity meant some white people weren’t so damn clueless. That the feminist community I follow online was better. That Beyoncé’s loyal fans understood that she is about more than pop-y music and “Single Ladies” dances. Apparently, I was wrong.
I have a lot to be ashamed of as a white person but I had the reckless optimism to think that when white girls across America saw the “Formation” video they would react the way I did. That powerful video is a huge statement for the black community and black girls everywhere and I couldn’t love it more. Its not about me and I am happy to sit down and applaud. Anytime a marginalized community is lifted up (especially in a spotlight as big as Beyoncé and the Super Bowl), it is better for all of us.
We talk about checking our privilege but maybe some people aren’t ready to give up that privilege. I want to go to a job interview and not worry that I won’t get it just because I’m a woman. I also don’t want to get it just because my competition is a black woman with natural hair. White girls, this isn’t about us and that’s okay. So shut up and be happy that change is happening.