black women's history

A movie about Viola Davis because her life deserves to be known

The only picture I have of my childhood is the picture of me in kindergarten, I have this expression on my face — it’s not a smile, it’s not a frown. I swear to you, that’s the girl who wakes up in the morning and who looks around her house and her life saying, ‘I cannot believe how God has blessed me.’ “ 

“I would jump in trash bins with maggots looking for food, and I would steal from the corner store because I was hungry, I never had any kids come to my house because my house was a condemned building, it was boarded up, it was infested with rats. I was one of those kids who were poor and knew it.” 

“I was the kind of poor where I knew right away I had less than everyone around me. We had nothing, I cannot believe my life, I just can’t, I’m so blessed. I would jump in trash bins with maggots looking for food, and I would steal from the corner store because I was hungry, I never had any kids come to my house because my house was a condemned building, it was boarded up, it was infested with rats. I was one of those kids who were poor and knew it.”

“It became a motivation as opposed to something else — the thing about poverty is that it starts affecting your mind and your spirit because people don’t see you, I chose from a very young age that I didn’t want that for my life. And it very much has helped me appreciate and value the things that are in my life now because I never had it. A yard, a house, great plumbing, a full refrigerator, things that people take for granted, I don’t.”

I first envisioned myself as an actor after I watched Cicely Tyson in The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman when I was a child.”

“It wasn’t until then that I had a visual manifestation of the target I wanted to hit, It also gave me hope for the future and a different life for myself, she helped me have a very specific drive of how I was going to crawl, walk, run from that environment.”

“I became an artist, and thank God I did, because we are the only profession that celebrates what it means to live a life,” 

7

White women need to deal with the fact that most of you voted for Trump. It’s the not the job of black women or any marginalised and oppressed person to take responsibility for the actions of their oppressor or to educate their oppressor.

Hand-colored tintype portrait of three unidentified African American women, c. 1856.

Source: Harvard Library.

Members of the 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion, the first all-African-American, all-female unit to serve overseas in World War II, take part in a parade ceremony in honor of Joan d'Arc at the marketplace where she was burned at the stake. Rouen, France. May 27, 1945.

(US National Archives)

Viola Davis will star in and produce a biopic on the life of Harriet Tubman on HBO, the movie is based on the 2004 book, “Bound for the Promised Land Harriet Tubman Portrait: of an American Hero” by historian Kate Clifford Larson.

And Aisha Hinds is playing Harriet Tubman in WGN America’s Underground.

And Cynthia Erivo will play the iconic abolitionist Harriet Tubman in the upcoming Macro/New Balloon biopic, HARRIET.

WE HAVE THREE HARRIET TUBMAN

#BlackHistoryMonth

4

Happy Blackout Day! My name is Sophia and I’m a scifi writer! I have two books on amazon. One is a scifi mystery about a black girl named Cosmo. My second book is a short romance story about black love in space!

Also sometimes I tweet things.

Black Women Are

Pioneers: Harriet Tubman

Originally posted by nyuniversity

Educated: 

Dr. Hadiya Nicole Green AKA  The Pioneer in the fight against cancer



Michelle Obama

Originally posted by theproblackgirl

Beautiful: Jackie Aina (She’s also artistic, intelligent, funny)

Originally posted by fuckyeahfemaleyoutubers

Uzo Aduba

Originally posted by theproblackgirl

Soulful: Chargaux 

Originally posted by thechronicleofshe

Nina Simone

Originally posted by rollingstone


Phenomenal:  Oprah  

Originally posted by larry-ride-or-die

Beyonce

Originally posted by aninounettear


Hilarious:  Leslie Jones 

Originally posted by teachingfeelslike

Gabourey Sidible

Originally posted by dailyahsgifs


Poetic: Maya Angelou

Lauryn Hill

Originally posted by hip-hop-fanatic

Confident: 

Marsai Martin

Originally posted by wildjay101

Solange Knowles 

Originally posted by amarachixxxiv

Yara Shahidi 

Originally posted by thepowerofblackwomen


Fearless: Assata Shakur & Angela Davis

Originally posted by ch-r-o-m-e

Originally posted by thesecrowns

Unwavering:   Lezley McSpadden, Gwen Carr, Wanda Johnson,  and Sybrina Fulton aka Mothers of The Movement

Fighters:  Alicia Garza, Patrisse Cullors, and Opal Tometi aka founders of #BlackLivesMatter

Visionaries: Ava Duvernay (Director)

Shonda Rhimes (producer, screenwriter)

Determined: Ilhan Omar (Politician)

Originally posted by refinery29

Olympians:

Gabby Douglas

Originally posted by i-dont-understand-gymnastics

Simone Biles

Originally posted by sports-and-everything-else

Serena and Venus (and someone asking them a dumb question)

Originally posted by youreunattractiveinside

Allyson Fellix

Originally posted by bashfulhound

Ibtihaj Muhammad

Originally posted by womens-sports

Some Bonus Awesomeness:

Amber Riley

Originally posted by chichichichias

Kerry Washington, Taraji P Henson, and Mary J Blige 

Originally posted by alyandmatt

Janelle Monae 

Originally posted by tragedyb0ner

Despite being one of the most disrespected demographics, black women remain to be an integral part of America’s (and also global) history, present, and future. Validate, and humanize them. And take note of all the badassery and awesomeness. 


Originally posted by theblvckcool



#BlackHistoryMonth #tbt: Being the first African American woman to travel to space is one of Mae Jemison’s many accomplishments. A dancer, Peace Corps doctor, public speaker and astronaut, Mae went to college at age 16, holds 9 honorary doctorates and has founded many STEM-related programs for students.