black women pioneers

Black Women Are

Pioneers: Harriet Tubman

Originally posted by nyuniversity

Educated: 

Dr. Hadiya Nicole Green AKA  The Pioneer in the fight against cancer



Michelle Obama

Originally posted by theproblackgirl

Beautiful: Jackie Aina (She’s also artistic, intelligent, funny)

Originally posted by fuckyeahfemaleyoutubers

Uzo Aduba

Originally posted by theproblackgirl

Soulful: Chargaux 

Originally posted by thechronicleofshe

Nina Simone

Originally posted by rollingstone


Phenomenal:  Oprah  

Originally posted by larry-ride-or-die

Beyonce

Originally posted by aninounettear


Hilarious:  Leslie Jones 

Originally posted by teachingfeelslike

Gabourey Sidible

Originally posted by dailyahsgifs


Poetic: Maya Angelou

Lauryn Hill

Originally posted by hip-hop-fanatic

Confident: 

Marsai Martin

Originally posted by wildjay101

Solange Knowles 

Originally posted by amarachixxxiv

Yara Shahidi 

Originally posted by thepowerofblackwomen


Fearless: Assata Shakur & Angela Davis

Originally posted by ch-r-o-m-e

Originally posted by thesecrowns

Unwavering:   Lezley McSpadden, Gwen Carr, Wanda Johnson,  and Sybrina Fulton aka Mothers of The Movement

Fighters:  Alicia Garza, Patrisse Cullors, and Opal Tometi aka founders of #BlackLivesMatter

Visionaries: Ava Duvernay (Director)

Shonda Rhimes (producer, screenwriter)

Determined: Ilhan Omar (Politician)

Originally posted by refinery29

Olympians:

Gabby Douglas

Originally posted by i-dont-understand-gymnastics

Simone Biles

Originally posted by sports-and-everything-else

Serena and Venus (and someone asking them a dumb question)

Originally posted by youreunattractiveinside

Allyson Fellix

Originally posted by bashfulhound

Ibtihaj Muhammad

Originally posted by womens-sports

Some Bonus Awesomeness:

Amber Riley

Originally posted by chichichichias

Kerry Washington, Taraji P Henson, and Mary J Blige 

Originally posted by alyandmatt

Janelle Monae 

Originally posted by tragedyb0ner

Despite being one of the most disrespected demographics, black women remain to be an integral part of America’s (and also global) history, present, and future. Validate, and humanize them. And take note of all the badassery and awesomeness. 


Originally posted by theblvckcool



The Shea Moisture ad should have looked like this.  If you read that bottle they talk about their grandmother from Sierra Leone West Africa.  The Queen who started it all.  They had the nerve to sit in a editing room and sign off on this being the first commercial with 1 mixed woman of color and 4 white woman at the forefront.  While a black woman was in the background in a small square for a second on screen.  White people using the product is not the issue its the disrespect and lack of representation of a black woman.  The blatant erasure of the black women who pioneered this product.  A black woman who founded this product.  A Black Woman of brown skin and kinky/coily hair should have been represented.  This is not about you white people.  It’s about us.

GrandMama Shea Moisture no where in sight… SMH.  She was erased from her own product she created with blood, sweat and tears.  Shame.

“I only write about what I go through, or things I’ve learned along the way.”

MC Lyte was one of the first female rappers to point out the sexism and misogyny that often runs rampant in hip-hop, often taking the subject head on lyrically in her songs and helping open the door for such future artists as Queen Latifah and Missy Elliott. Rapper MC Lyte forged the way for other female MCs to find their way in the often-sexist, male-dominated world of hip hop. Lyte became the first female rap artist to achieve gold certification for her single “Ruffneck.” In six albums, she produced four Number One rap singles.

Lyte was born Lana Moorer, in Queens and raised in the East Flatbush section of Brooklyn, New York.She began rapping when she was 12, learning from her brothers Milk and Gizmo of the rap group Audio Two. Her father, Nat Robinson, started the First Priority record label in 1987, and her brothers appeared on her first three albums. Her first single, “I Cram to Understand U (Sam),” became an instant cult classic. The song is about a woman who has to compete for her man’s attentions, but her competition isn’t another woman, it’s crack cocaine. The single, released when Lyte was still a teen, set a standard for adult, hard-core rap that has rarely been equaled since.

Her first album, Lyte as a Rock, was released on First Priority in 1988 and produced by her brothers. The album contained samples from Ray Charles, Helen Reddy, and the Four Seasons. It’s notable for its narrative songs, like “10% Dis” and “Paper Thin,”that tell fleshed-out stories featuring doomed but interesting characters. Despite the assertive, in-your-face persona Lyte shows in her music and onstage, the artist is known for her soft-spoken demeanor behind the scenes. Lyte’s follow up to Lyte as a Rock, Eyes on This, was released a year after her debut, when she was just 19. The album “maintained her reputation as an insult-hurling tough talker who rapped to hard, simple beats,” People critic Michael Small wrote. It featured production by Grand Puba and the hit single “Cha Cha Cha,” which reached number one on the rap charts. Lyte took a courageous stand against violence in the haunting song “Cappuccino.”

She became an anti-violence spokesperson, namely for the Stop the Violence campaign, which took her into schools to speak to kids. She also appeared in public service announcements for the Rock the Vote
campaign, which featured her song “I’m Not Having It.” She appeared in PSAs for Musicians for Life and supported various AIDS charities. Lyte became the first rapper to perform at Carnegie Hall at a 1990 AIDS benefit.Lyte hired R&B producers Wolf and Epic, of Bel Biv Devoe fame, to produce her third release, Act Like You Know,which came out in 1991. The result was a smoother, more soulful turn for the artist. Despite the commercial success of the singles “When In Love,” “Poor Georgie,” and “Eyes Are the Soul,” Lyte’s fans despaired that their aggressive, street-smart diva had softened her style.

On her fourth release, 1993’s Ain’t No Other, Lyte returned to her harder-edged rhymes, much to the relief of her fans. “Back to basics,” she said in a Billboard interview at the time, “that’s what’s happening to rap music now. I worked with some young, hungry… rappers. Being around them gave me a whole different feel.” KRS-ONE from Boogie Down Productions contributed a few lines at the album’s start to introduce it, and Lyte laid out an aggressive affront to disrespecting rapper Roxanne Shanté on “Steady F. King.” Lyte intentionally avoided moral or message songs on this album, she
later said, to avoid sounding too much like she was preaching.

Though Lyte enjoys listening to message-driven rap, she told Billboard, ” evidently core hip-hop fans don’t want to hear that. They want to party, so I gave them fat beats and fat lyrics about me.” The single “Ruffneck” was produced by Wreckx ‘N’Effect, and was nominated for a Grammy award for Best Rap Single, and earned the first-ever gold certification for record sales by a female rap artist. She spent the summer of 1994 on a sold-out tour, opening forJanet Jackson. She also made an appearance on Jackson’s song “You Want This.” She teamed up with fellow female rappers Yo Yo and Queen Latifah to create the hit remix of singer Brandy’s “I Wanna Be Down.”Lyte’s fifth album, Bad as I Wanna B,found her on a new record label, Elektra/Asylum. It also found her with a heightened sense of responsibility for the music she made, and the impact it had on her fans. It once was considered “cool” to curse on rap records, to “prove you were the baddest,” Lyte admitted in an Essence interview, according to a 1996 People review. “Now I feel responsible for what comes out of my mouth.”

That said, she practically began the album with an expletive, but toned
it down as the album played out. She earned her second gold record for “Keep On Keepin’ On,” which appeared on Bad As I Wanna B. She teamed up with the female R&B group X-Scape on the song, which won a Soul Train Award and was featured on the Sunset Park soundtrack. That album also contained Lyte’s hit single “Cold Rock A Party,” which featured Lyte teamed up for a duet with hip-hop diva Missy Elliot. Elliot was featured again on Lyte’s 1998 release, Seven & Seven, on three tracks, “In My Business,” “Too Fly,” and “Want What I Got.” Artists Giovanni and L.L Cool J. who produced the track “Play Girls Play,” also lent a hand. She hired producers the Neptunes to handle and co-write “Closer,” “I Can’t Make a Mistake,” and “It’s All Yours,” which also featured vocals by singer Gina Thompson.

“Some of my best work has been when I’m vibing with others.”Beyond recording records and releasing increasingly popular singles, many female MCs began to diversify in the late 1990s. Some started record companies, some went into acting. Lyte went to Los Angeles to pursue an acting career. She has appeared in such television sitcoms as Moesha and In the House, and on the drama New York Undercover, and plays a recurring role as Lana on the show For Your Love. She also appeared in the independent film A Luv Tale. “I know I can do both,” Lyte said of acting and hip hop in her bio located online at MCLyte.com. “but hip hop is my first love.”

After the success of the “Cold Rock A Party,”Lyte began doing voice-overs. Hers was the voice behind a national advertising campaign for Wherehouse Music. She was the voice little girls heard after Christmas of 2000 from the African-American “Chat Doll,” named Tia, manufactured by Mattel. She founded her own management company, Duke Da Moon Productions, which handled the groups Isisand Born In Hell, a Brooklyn rap unit. She also signed a three-year deal with Sirius Satellite Radio. who hired her to host a musical show that airs three time daily. She also hosted a talk show for Sirius,
interviewing black celebrities and entertainers such as Whoopi Goldberg,
Vivica Fox, and Tisha Campbell.Looking back on a career that started when she was just a teenager, Lyte is able to find pride and a valuable lesson in her experiences. “I’m proud of how long I’ve been in the business,” she said in the Artist Direct interview. “Ofcourse when I started I never imagined some of the things you have to go through. But anything you do in life is about meeting the challenges.What I tell any young people who want to get into this business is you have to be prepared to never give up.” Rhino Records released a collection of MC Lyte’s work in 2001 called The Very Best of MC Lyte.

MC Lyte has spoken at colleges and universities, for organizations around the globe, and with notable people like Iyanla Vanzant, Russell Simmons, and Soledad O'Brien bringing a message of empowerment from her book Unstoppable: Igniting the Power Within to Achieve Your Greatest Potential. She also partnered with the Thurgood Marshall College Fund on the iLEAD international tour  in South Africa to empower the continent’s youth and up and coming leaders. MC Lyte served as the President of the Los Angeles Chapter of the Recording Academy (the Grammy organization) from 2011 to 2013. She is the first African American to serve in this role and she is also the CEO of Sunni Gyrl, Inc., an entertainment and production firm, and the founder of Hip Hop Sisters Foundation, which has presented two $100,000 scholarships to college students each year since its inception,and she is an honorary member of Sigma Gamma Rho sorority.

In October 2006, MC Lyte was one of the honored artists on VH1’s annual award show Hip Hop Honors.[ She was joined by fellow female MC’s Da Brat, Remy Ma, and Lil’ Kim as they performed some of her tracks, such as “Cha Cha Cha,” “Lyte as a Rock,” “Paper-Thin,” and “Ruffneck.” In 2013, MC Lyte received the Lifetime Achievement Award at the 2013 Hip Hop Inaugural Ball, and she also received the BET “I Am Hip Hop” Icon Lifetime Achievement Award, making her the first female solo hip hop artist to receive the honor from the network.

synovya  asked:

hey, i was wondering if u know of any "reputable" links to articles/books/data about the oppression of trans ppl internationally/how imperialism has created transphobia that affects us (trans ppl) on a global scale? i'm writing a paper for my "making of the 21st century" course & i need a biblio w sources, but i take all my news from individuals (cause media is so transphobic by nature & i trust no main/popular consumption of trans experiences)& all the articles i'm looking at are so cis :/ ty!!

the first thing you need to consider is that “transphobia” is a culturally and historically specific framework to describe the oppression of people who are understood/marked as “trans” in different societies. transness is not defined all over the world in the same way as, say, in mainstream U.S. trans activism (pakistan and the ivory coast come to mind). it is important not to universalize one definition. sometimes transness isn’t even defined at all and that framework cannot be placed upon certain peoples. the politics placed upon the cis/trans dichotomy in the U.S. that spread to other western countries are not the strongest, but i understand why some western trans activisms produced it and it is crucial to understand why it was produced, and the cis/trans dichotomy isn’t a global political organizational tool. so, transgender people or people who live outside of man/woman experience exist in many societies but “cisness” might not at the same time.

so, with this in mind, you can absolutely still find sources for the oppression of trans people in different countries, but be certain not to project a U.S. or historically-specific framework for trans politics onto societies with their own specific histories regarding gender nonconformity.

a good documentary to watch is woubi cheri, which explores some “LBGT” organizing in the ivory coast.

look into the plight of trans women in brazil.

research Muxe experience in mexico.

research sistergirls and brotherboys in australia.

research Khwaja Saraa, transgender people of pakistan.

you could also look into the ballroom scene in the U.S., created by black gay men and black trans women, and pioneered by black and latin@ LGBT people. paris is burning is a popular documentary. but beyond that moment, the ballroom scene has such a rich history of its own and the people in it have ways of being that aren’t on the radar of mainstream trans activism in the U.S. (though it is wildly pilfered of course).

*and how could i forget two spirit people. there’s a good piece by pheonix singer here with other sources on different issues regarding gender and colonialism.

*research the Mahu people of hawaii and look into the documentary called “a place in the middle”

*research transgender people in uganda. you can start here. and here’s another piece with cleo quentaro.

i’ve got a pretty expansive tag with snippets of sources all over the world here as well, that is woman-centric: http://womon.tumblr.com/tagged/trans+women+and+girls

hope this helps you. if you have more questions feel free to ask!

If you subscribe to the most basic tenets of feminism and women's liberation, and the eradication of the heteropatriarchy/male-supremacist hegemony

…then thank Black women. Black women pioneered feminist theory and praxis, and hell, even Gloria Steinem admitted to it in an interview. bell hooks, Angela Davis, Audre Lorde, Alice Walker, Patricia Hill Collins, Barbara Smith, Kimberlé Crenshaw, and so on. And it was Black women who brought us the Black Lives Matter Movement and coined the neologism “misogynoir”. White women do not- and never had a monopoly on feminism and women’s liberation. And in addition to the great many contributions (and even leadership) Black women made to feminism and women’s liberation remember there’s also Third World/anti-colonial feminism, Latina feminism, Xicana feminism, Asian feminism, Muslim feminists, Middle Eastern feminists, Indigenous feminists, butch lesbian feminists of Color, etc. So don’t be fooled by the horribly whitewashed photos of the Women’s March from around the globe. Feminists of Color/women’s liberationists of Color have always existed and have been in the thick of the struggle to liberate the female sex and abolish the heteropatriarchy/male-supremacist hegemony, along with the white/Western-supremacist power structure.

2

Two Amazing Pioneering Black Women Who Made Great Contributions In the Scientific Field of Physics

Willie Hobbs Moore (1934-1994)- (pictured above) was the first African-American woman to earn a Ph.D. in physics.

A native of Atlantic City, New Jersey, Moore moved to Ann Arbor, Michigan, in 1952 to attend the University of Michigan. She earned a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from the University of Michigan in 1958 and her master’s degree in 1961.[2] While working toward her doctoral degree, she also held positions at technology firms in Ann Arbor including KMS Industries and Datamax Corporation.[3] She also held engineering positions at Bendix Aerospace Systems, Barnes Engineering, and Sensor Dynamics, where she was responsible for the theoretical analysis.[4] Moore completed her thesis, A Vibrational Analysis of Secondary Chlorides, under the supervision of Samuel Krimm at the University of Michigan in 1972.[5] This work was applicable to important questions in the vibrational study of macromolecules.[1]

After receiving her doctorate, Moore worked at the University of Michigan as a research scientist until 1977, continuing spectroscopic work on proteins. In the five years following her dissertation, she published more than thirty papers with Krimm and collaborators.[5] She was hired by Ford Motor Company in 1977 as an assembly engineer.[6] Moore expanded Ford’s use of Japanese engineering and manufacturing methods in the 1980s.[7][8] In 1991, Ebony magazine named Moore as one of their 100 “most promising black women in corporate America.”

Moore was a tutor, a member of Links Inc., a member of the Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church, and the chairwoman of the Juanita D. Woods Scholarship Fund. She was married to Sidney L. Moore, who taught at the University of Michigan’s Neuropsychiatric Institute, for thirty years. They had two children Dr. Dorian Moore, MD. and Christopher Hobbs Moore, RN. Willie also had three grandchildren Sydney Padgett, William Hobbs Moore, and C. Jackson Moore [3]

Moore died of cancer in 1994.

Source: Wikipedia

Shirley Ann Jackson (August 5, 1946)- (pictured below Mrs. Moore) is an American physicist and the eighteenth president of the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. She received herPh.D. in nuclear physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1973, becoming the first African-American woman to earn a doctorate at MIT

Jackson was born in Washington D.C. Her parents, Beatrice and George Jackson, strongly valued education and encouraged her in school.[5] Her father spurred on her interest in science by helping her with projects for her science classes. At Roosevelt High School, Jackson attended accelerated programs in both math and science and graduated in 1964 as valedictorian. [5]

Jackson began classes at MIT in 1964, one of fewer than twenty African American students and the only one studying theoretical physics. While a student she did volunteer work at Boston City Hospital and tutored students at the Roxbury YMCA.[5] She earned her bachelor’s degree in 1968, writing her thesis on solid-state physics.

Jackson elected to stay at MIT for her doctoral work, in part to encourage more African-American students to attend the institution.[5] She worked on elementary particle theory for her Ph.D., which she completed in 1973, the first African-American woman to earn a doctorate degree from MIT. Her research was directed by James Young.[5] Jackson was also the second African-American woman in the United States to earn a doctorate in physics

As a postdoctoral researcher of subatomic particles during the 1970s, Jackson studied and conducted research at a number of prestigious physics laboratories in both the United States and Europe. Her first position was as a research associate at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, Illinois (known as Fermilab) where she studied hadrons. In 1974, she became visiting scientist at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Switzerland. There she explored theories of strongly interacting elementary particles. In 1976 and 1977, she both lectured in physics at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center and became a visiting scientist at the Aspen Center for Physics.

At one time her research focused on Landau–Ginsburg theories of charge density waves in layered compounds, and has studied two-dimensional Yang-Mills gauge theories and neutrino reactions.

Jackson has described her interests:

I am interested in the electronic, optical, magnetic, and transport properties of novel semiconductor systems. Of special interest are the behavior of magnetic polarons in semimagnetic and dilute magnetic semiconductors, and the optical response properties of semiconductor quantum wells and superlattices. My interests also include quantum dots, mesoscopic systems, and the role of antiferromagnetic fluctuations in correlated 2D electron systems.[5]

Jackson joined the Theoretical Physics Research Department at AT&T Bell Laboratories in 1976, examining the fundamental properties of various materials. She began her time at Bell Labs by studying materials to be used in the semiconductor industry.[7] In 1978, Jackson became part of the Scattering and Low Energy Physics Research Department, and in 1988 she moved to the Solid State and Quantum Physics Research Department. At Bell Labs, Jackson researched the optical and electronic properties of two-dimensional and quasi-two-dimensional systems. In her research, Jackson has made contributions to the knowledge of charged density waves in layered compounds, polaronic aspects of electrons in the surface of liquid helium films, and optical and electronic properties of semiconductor strained-layer superlattices. On these topics and others, she has prepared or collaborated on over 100 scientific articles.[5]

Jackson served on the faculty at Rutgers University in Piscataway and New Brunswick, New Jersey from 1991 to 1995, in addition to continuing to consult with Bell Labs on semiconductor theory. Her research during this time focused on the electronic and optical properties of two-dimensional systems.

In 1995, President Bill Clinton appointed Jackson to serve as Chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), becoming the first woman and first African-American to hold that position.[4] At the NRC, she had “ultimate authority for all NRC functions pertaining to an emergency involving an NRC licensee.

On July 1st, 1999, Jackson became the 18th president of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. She was the first woman and first African-American to hold this position. Since her appointment to president of RPI, Jackson has helped raise over $1 billion in donations for philanthropic causes.[8] Jackson is leading a strategic initiative called The Rensselaer Plan and much progress has been made towards achieving the Plan’s goals. She has overseen a large capital improvement campaign, including the construction of an Experimental Media and Performing Arts Center and the East Campus Athletic Village. She enjoys the ongoing support of the RPI Board of Trustees. On April 26, 2006, the faculty of RPI (including a number of retirees) voted 155 to 149 against a vote of no-confidence in Jackson.[9] In the Fall of 2007, the Rensselaer Board of Trustees suspended the faculty senate, thus prompting a strong reaction from the Rensselaer community that resulted in various protests including a "teach-in”.[10][11]

Since arriving at RPI, Jackson has been one of the highest-paid university presidents in the nation.[12] Her combined salary and benefits have expanded from $423,150 in 1999-2000 to over $1.3 million in 2006-07 and to $2.34 million in 2010.[13][14] In 2011 Jackson’s salary was $1.75 million.[15] In 2006-07, it is estimated she received another $1.3 million from board seats at several major corporations.[13] The announcement of layoffs at RPI in Decembe 2008 led some in the RPI community to question whether the institute should continue to compensate Jackson at this level, maintain a $450,000 Adirondack residence for her, and continue to support a personal staff of housekeepers, bodyguards and other aides.[13] In July 2009, the news reported on the construction of a 10,000-square-foot (930 m2) mountain-top home in Bolton, New York, overlooking Lake George. A water-quality activist raised concerns about possible environmental hazards from the construction of a driveway, but according to Department of Environmental Conservation officials, the work was in compliance.[16]

In its 2009 review of the decade 1999-2009, McClatchy Newspapers reported Jackson as the highest-paid currently sitting college president in the U.S., with a 2008 salary of approximately $1.6 million.[17] On December 4–5, 2009 Jackson celebrated her 10th year at RPI with an extravagant “Celebration Weekend”, which featured tribute concerts by Aretha Franklin and Joshua Bell among other events.[18][19] Following the weekend, the Board of Trustees announced they would support construction of a new guest house on Jackson’s property, for the purpose of “[enabling] the president to receive and entertain, appropriately, Rensselaer constituents, donors, and other high-level visitors”.[20] It was later reported that Jackson’s current house on Tibbits Avenue has 4,884 square feet (453.7 m2) of space, seven bedrooms and five bathrooms, and an estimated value of $1,122,500.[21] The trustees said that “the funds for this new project would not have been available for any other purpose”.[20] William Walker, the school’s vice president of strategic communications and external relations noted, “The board sees this very much as a long-term investment … for President Jackson and her successors.”[21] On February 2, 2010, the Troy Zoning Board of Appeals denied RPI’s request for a zoning variance allowing them to construct the new house at a height of 44 feet (13 m), which would exceed the 25-foot (7.6 m) height restriction on buildings in residential areas. The Zoning Board stated that it is “too big”, and two firefighters believed the property would be difficult to access with emergency vehicles.[22] A new plan was announced on February 25, describing how the president’s house will be replaced with a new two-story house.[23] The new house will have “9,600 square feet of livable space, divided approximately equally between living space for the president’s family and rooms for the president to conduct meetings and events”.[24] In June 2010, it was discovered that the newest plans for the house showed a new size of 19,500 square feet (1,810 m2), causing the city of Troy to issue a stop-work order until additional building fees were paid.[25] Jackson’s development and implementation of the Rensselaer Plan enabled her to secure a $360 million unrestricted gift commitment to the university.[26]

In June 2010, it was announced that the Rensselaer Board of Trustees unanimously voted to extend Jackson a ten-year contract renewal, which she accepted.[27] Shirley Ann Jackson’s compensation ranked 1st among USA private university presidents in 2014.

Jackson has received many fellowships, including the Martin Marietta Aircraft Company Scholarship and Fellowship, the Prince Hall Masons Scholarship, the National Science Foundation Traineeship, and a Ford Foundation Advanced Study Fellowship. She has been elected to numerous special societies, including the American Physical Society and American Philosophical Society.[29]

Her achievements in science and education have been recognized with multiple awards, including the CIBA-GEIGY Exceptional Black Scientist Award. In the early 1990s, Governor James Florio awarded her the Thomas Alva Edison Science Award for her contributions to physics and for the promotion of science. In 2001, she received the Richtmyer Memorial Award given annually by the American Association of Physics Teachers. She has also received many honorary doctorate degrees.[30]

She was inducted into National Women’s Hall of Fame in 1998 for “her significant contributions as a distinguished scientist and advocate for education, science, and public policy”.[citation needed]

Jackson has also been active in professional associations and in serving society through public scientific commissions. In 1985, Governor Thomas Kean appointed her to the New Jersey Commission on Science and Technology. She is an active voice in numerous committees of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), and the National Science Foundation. Her continuing aim has been to preserve and strengthen the U.S. national capacity for innovation by increasing support for basic research in science and engineering. This is done in part by attracting talent from abroad and by expanding the domestic talent pool by attracting women and members of under-represented groups into careers in science. In 2004, she became president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and chaired the AAAS board in 2005.

In spring 2007, she was awarded the Vannevar Bush Award for “a lifetime of achievements in scientific research, education and senior statesman-like contributions to public policy”.[31]

Jackson continues to be involved in politics and public policy. In 2008, she became the University Vice Chairman of the U.S. Council on Competitiveness, a not-for-profit group based in Washington, D.C. In 2009, President Barack Obama appointed Jackson to serve on the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, a 20-member advisory group dedicated to public policy.[32]

She was appointed an International Fellow[2] of the Royal Academy of Engineering[2] in 2012.

Jackson serves on the boards of directors of many organizations:[3]

Shirley Jackson is married to Morris A. Washington, a physics professor at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and has one son, Alan, a Dartmouth College alumnus.

Source: Wikipedia