black women performers

"Many of the anti-black women stereotypes originated during slavery.Long before sociologists perpetuated theories about the experience of black matriarchy, white male slave owners created a body of myths to discredit the contributions of black females; one such myth was the notion that they were all masculinized sub-human creatures.Black female slaves had shown that they were capable of performing so-called "manly" labor, that they were able to endure hardship, pain, and privation but could also perform those so called " womanly" tasks of housekeeping , cooking, and child-rearing. Their  ability to cope effectively in a sexist-defined "male" role threatened patriarchal myths about the nature of woman's inherent physiological difference and inferiority. By forcing black female slaves to perform the same work tasks as black male slaves, white ale patriarchs were contradicting their own sexist order that claimed woman to be inferior because she lacked physical prowess. An explanation had to be provided to explain why black women were able to perform tasks that were cited by patriarchs as job women were incapable of performing. To explain the black female's ability to surie without the direct aid of a male and her ability to perform tasks that were culturally defined as "male" work, white males argued that black slave women were not "real" women but were masculinized sub-human creatures." Bell Hooks "Ain't I A Woman" pg 71
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In black and white or in full color, we’re here, and we matter. Have an amazing week!!

I am so tired of seeing old white people complain about Beyoncé’s half time show.

It’s 2016. Stop being ignorant assholes who can’t admit that police brutality is a serious problem. Stop being racist. Just stop.

To the Millennials who are racist. ENOUGH. You’re supposed to be better than the last generation. You all should know better.

Black female slaves had shown that they were capable of performing so-called “manly” labor, that they were able to endure hardship, pain, and privation but could also perform those so-called “womanly” tasks of housekeeping, cooking, and child rearing. Their ability to cope effectively in a sexist-defined “male” role threatened patriarchal myths about the nature of woman’s inherent physiological difference and inferiority. By forcing black female slaves to perform the same work tasks as black male slaves, white male patriarchs were contradicting their own sexist order that claimed woman to be inferior because she lacked physical prowess. An explanation had to be provided to explain why black women were able to perform tasks that were cited by patriarchs as jobs women were incapable of performing. To explain the black female’s ability to survive without the direct aid of a male and her ability to perform tasks that were culturally defined as “male” work, white males argued that black slave women were not “real” women but were masculinized sub-human creatures.
—  bell hooks, Ain’t I a Woman: Black Women and Feminism

y'all apparently it’s not okay for me to dislike racist white women simply because they’re women

HERStory Matters: Pioneering educator Maria Louise Baldwin was born on September 13, 1856.

Born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, Mary received all of her education in Cambridge’s schools. In 1874, Baldwin graduated from Cambridge High School and went on to graduate from the Cambridge Training School for Teachers.

Baldwin wrote to then-Cambridge School Board member Horace E. Scudder, asking him to help her secure a teaching position. Scudder told her, however, that it seemed to him that it was clearly her duty to go south and work for those with more limited educational opportunities. Unable to land a teaching job in Cambridge, she headed south for Chestertown, Md., where she taught for two years.

Baldwin did not give up the hope that she might one day obtain a teaching post in Cambridge. After discussing the matter with several people, she became convinced that there was work to be done in New England — living down race prejudice and demonstrating that black women could perform good and worthy work wherever they might cast their lot.

Perhaps caving in to pressure applied by the African American community, in 1882 the Cambridge School Department hired Baldwin as a teacher at the Agassiz School, making her the only black public school teacher in Cambridge. In 1889, she became principal of the school, making her the first African-American female principal in Massachusetts and the Northeast. As principal, Baldwin supervised white faculty and a predominantly white student body.

In 1916, as a new Agassiz school was erected to include higher grades and Mary Baldwin was made schoolmaster, supervising twelve teachers and five hundred students. She was one of only two women in the Cambridge school system who held the position of master and the only African-American in New England to hold such a position.

Baldwin ultimately served as master of Agassiz school for forty years. Under her leadership, the school of Agassiz became one of the best in the city, attended by children of Harvard professors and many of the old Cambridge families. She introduced new methods of teaching mathematics and began art classes. She was also the first to introduce the practice of hiring a school nurse. Her school was the only one in the city of Cambridge to establish an “open-air” classroom.

A lifelong learner, Maria took many classes at Harvard University and other colleges. She also was an instructor who taught summer courses for teachers at Hampton Institute in Virginia and the Institute for Colored Youth in Pennsylvania.

She won praises all over the country for her lecture on the life of Harriet Beecher Stowe and presented lectures on presidents Washington, Jefferson and Lincoln as well. Baldwin often gave readings from the works of African-American poet, novelist and playwright Paul Lawrence Dunbar. Her home became the center for various literary activities. There she held weekly readings for African American students attending Harvard.

Maria Baldwin held leadership positions in a number of civic and educational organizations. Not only did she help Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin establish the Woman’s Era Club — a group comprised chiefly of prominent black women who dedicated their efforts to cultural enrichment, charitable work and women’s suffrage — but on Jan. 17, 1894, she became the club’s vice president.

Baldwin belonged to many social and literary clubs, including the Twentieth Century Club, the Cantabrigia Club and the Banneker Club. She was also a member of the “Omar Circle,” a small group of black intellectuals. In 1897, she and Booker T. Washington were elected honorary members of the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences.

Baldwin volunteered her time raising money for the education of African-American children and young adults. On March 27, 1900, at the Madison Square Garden Concert Hall, she and W. E. B. Du Bois addressed a meeting to raise funds for a free kindergarten for African American children in New York City.

While addressing the council of the Robert Gould Shaw House Association at the Copley Plaza Hotel in Boston, on January 9, 1922, Maria Baldwin collapsed and died suddenly of heart disease.

In her honor, the League of Women for Community Service dedicated the Maria L. Baldwin Memorial Library on Dec. 20, 1923.

In 1976, the Maria Baldwin House was named a National Historic Landmark. It is located at 196 Prospect Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts. A private home, it is not open for tours.

On February 12, 2004, Agassiz School was officially renamed the Maria L. Baldwin School as a result of a campaign initiated by an eighth-grade student at the school and actively supported by other students and the principal of the school.

has anyone found any good literature/theory on the politics of hygiene? 

I was talking with a friend about how gross our abusers were & abusers in general– and in a lot of cases that’s both their personality and the fact that they just don’t bother with basic hygiene that’d be a courtesy to folks around them like washing their genitals or cleaning up after they shave or piss on the toilet seat or whatever. This is cis white male abusers we’re talking about here. 

But it made me think– they’re entitled privileged shits, and they feel no pressure to maintain their hygiene. Whereas we, two cis white women, felt a lot more pressure to not only maintain more extensive hygiene routines, but to maintain an expectation of femininity in order to escape shame/ridicule/punishment. 

And then I know that black women are expected to perform even more intense hygiene rituals–  some black women I know need to set aside a whole day to do their hair, and it’s gorgeous, but that shit is never expected of white women like me. Even when I had long hair and was attempting culturally normative femininity, the most that was expected of me is a couple hours. A lot of white people don’t use washcloths, lotion, a lot of hygienic products that black folks use in care routines. Every other month there’s some new trend I see on my Facebook where some white folks are arguing why they should shower less frequently.

And I know that some trans women feel intense pressure to have immaculate make up and shaving routines, to have their outfits perfect, to spend hours in front of the mirror before they leave the house, because they’re at risk of violence if they don’t perform the expectations of trans feminine hygiene to a t. 

I know that fat women are constantly harassed and threatened for not maintaining extensive hygiene routines. There is so much fear involved in making sure their hair and make up and outfits are perfect or else they’re treated like they’re completely worthless by strangers, employers, etc.

I know disabled women are constantly pressured into exhausting hygiene routines even when they could use their spoons on other priorities. 

There is a huge, huge difference between what amount of hygiene is expected from people and what the consequences are for not meeting that expectation depending on someone’s position of power. 

It’s really troubling.