black subject

ice cream asks
  • chocolate: when was your first kiss?
  • french vanilla: how old are you?
  • cotton candy: three places you want to travel to?
  • strawberry: a language you wish you could speak?
  • coffee: favorite cosmetic brands?
  • mint chocolate chip: indoors or outdoors?
  • cookie dough: do you play any instruments?
  • rocky road: favorite songs at the moment?
  • butter pecan: favorite songs for life?
  • cheesecake: what's your zodiac sign?
  • toasted coconut: the beach or the pool?
  • chocolate chip: what's your most popular post?
  • bubblegum: books or movies?
  • pistachio: manga or anime?
  • salted caramel: favorite movies?
  • birthday cake: favorite books?
  • moose tracks: favorites for manga?
  • orange sherbet: favorites for anime?
  • peanut butter: favorite academic subject?
  • black raspberry: do you have any pets?
  • mango: when and why did you start your blog?
  • mocha: ideal weather conditions?
  • black cherry: four words that describe you?
  • neapolitan: things that stress you out?
  • raspberry truffle: favorite kind of music?
  • chocolate marshmallow: favorite brands of candy?
  • toffee: a card game that you're good at?
  • lemon custard: do you eat breakfast?
  • dark chocolate: turn ons?
  • fudge: turn offs?
  • peach: how do you relax?
  • praline: a popular book you haven't read yet?
  • superman: do you like sweaters?
  • cherry: do you drink tea or coffee?
  • dulce de leche: an instrument you wish you could play?
  • blackberry: have you ever laughed so hard you cried?
  • ginger: a new feature you wish tumblr could have?
  • blueberry lemon: favorite blogs?
  • almond: favorite mean girls quote?
  • butterscotch: what color are your nails right now?
  • cinnamon: have you ever been confessed to?
  • blue moon: have you ever had a crush on someone?
  • cappuccino crunch: do you take naps?
  • mint: the most embarrassing thing you've ever done?
  • brownie batter: do you like sushi?
  • key lime: where do you want to be right now?
  • red velvet: do you wear prescription glasses?
  • green tea: favorite flavors of ice cream?

Within the Land of Fiction exists a legendary all-female band known as the Valkyries. They consist of Wonder Woman (vocals/lead guitar), Black Widow (backup guitar), “Subject Zero” Jack (bass), Avatar Korra (drums), and Buffy Summers (keyboard). When a badass female character is losing a great battle, the Valkyries appear and play an epic song to rock her to victory. Today, as you wipe away the blood and stare into the face of your ultimate enemy through half-swollen eyes, straining through their grip for each breath, you see a bright flash appear in the sky, and across the battlefield rings the first chord of “Dare”…

demimink  asked:

can you give a run down on skintones?

PART ONE: COLOR SELECTION. 

In painting skin tones, a lot of the time I see people choose colors that are over-saturated or unbalanced. There isn’t really an exact art to this that I can explain—you just need to get a feel for what saturation balance you need for that particular skintone. Here are some examples of what I usually pick.

As you can see, I used different base colors (orange, reddish, yellow) for the skin shades in all three examples. The reason for this is because all skin tones have a different base color besides just Light, Medium, and dark. Some people divide them into categories of “warm” and “cool.” Pantone has some really good examples and references for this.

PART TWO: COLOR VARIATION.

Another big part about drawing and painting skin tones that a lot of people forget is how skin thickness affects color variation. The presence of bone, blood, and muscle underneath the skin affects its colors. This is especially noticeable on the face.

The colors here are a little exaggerated to show my point, but with a little adjusting and blending…

Voila! Subtle, but more realistic.

PART THREE: DETAILS.

Our skin is the largest organ on our body, and as our body’s first line of defense against the outside world, it’ll be covered with tiny details and imperfections. Things like sunburns, tans, freckles, scars, and facial hair all add character to your subject matter. Here are some examples!

TANS: Everyone tans differently, depending on your ethnicity and skin tone. Fair skinned folks tend to burn more than tan, which means you’ll need a more startling, eye-catching red. If you have a skin type that tends to tan more, the color will be more brown than red. For black skin tones, the tan is less red. (And while we’re on the subject: black people DO tan, so it’s important for you to put on sunscreen and be careful in the sun, too.)

Those are the areas that the sun tends to hit the most—and things like goggles, hats, and masks can change the shape of that area.

FRECKLES AND MOLES: Freckles are also products of the sun. Some people have freckles that stay year-round, while others have freckles that fade in the winter and return in the summer. Moles are skin cells that grow in a cluster instead of being spread throughout the skin. When exposed to the sun, they tend to darken. (Another note on skin health: if you have any oddly-shaped/colored moles, moles that have changed color, size, or shape, or anything of the sort, please check with your doctor!)

Freckles like to cluster around each other, sort of like stars, and they vary greatly in size. You can have a few freckles in one place, or a lot of freckles in multiple places. Most commonly freckled areas are your face, shoulders and neck, back, and forearms. 

FACIAL HAIR: Facial hair also affects the colors of the face. For simplicity’s sake we’ll be using black hair, as it is the most noticeable. Facial hair usually grows in these areas, and can make the skin look blueish/grayish because of the darker hairs beneath the skin. If your hair is red, this also very noticeable. 

END NOTE.

There you go! That’s about all I can think of at the moment for skin tones. As always, references and practice are your best friend (and so is this neat little trick that pheberoni has.) Good luck with your arting!

5

Women’s Art History Masterpost

In honor of International Women’s Day and Women’s History Month, feminist art scholar and research specialist at the Getty Research Institute, Anja Foerschner, selected key publications and journals for those want to explore art by women and feminist art.

The Feminist Art Journal (produced from 1972 to 1977).

The Power of Women and the Subversion of the Community by Mariarosa Dalla Costa and Selma James (1975).

Woman Artists 1550–1950 by Ann S. Harris (1977).

Chrysalis: A Magazine of Women’s Culture. (Produced from 1977 to 1980).
Free Download

Feminist Art Criticism: An Anthology by Arlene Raven, Cassandra Langer, and Joanna Ellen Frueh (1988).

Women, Art, and Power: And other Essays by Linda Nochlin (1988).

Women, Art, and Society by Whitney Chadwick (1990).

Art on My Mind: Visual Politics by Bell Hooks (1995).

Woven by the Grandmothers: Nineteenth-Century Navajo Textiles from the National Museum of the American Indian by Eulalie H. Bonar (1996).

Sexual Politics: Judy Chicago’s Dinner Party in Feminist Art History by Amelia Jones and Laura Cottingham (1996).

Beyond the Flower: The Autobiography of a Feminist Artist by Judy Chicago (1997).

Angry Women by Andrea Juno and V. Vale (1999).

Lesbian Art in America: A Contemporary History by Harmony Hammond (2000).

Black Feminist Cultural Criticism by Jacqueline Bobo (2001).

The Black Female Body: A Photographic History by Deborah Willis and Carla Williams (2002).

Art/Women/California, 1950–2000: Parallels and Intersections by Diana Burgess Fuller and Daniela Salvioni (2002).

Dark Designs and Visual Culture by Michele Wallace (2004).

Into Performance: Japanese Women Artists in New York by Midori Yoshimoto (2005).

WACK!: Art and the Feminist Revolution by Cornelia Butler and Lisa Gabrielle Mark (2007).

The Color of Stone: Sculpting the Black Female Subject in Nineteenth-Century America by Charmaine A. Nelson (2007).

Chicana Art: The Politics of Spiritual and Aesthetic Altarities by Laura E. Pérez (2007).

Ana Mendieta by María Ruido (2008).

Visual and Other Pleasures by L. Mulvey (2009).

Modern Women: Women artists at the Museum of Modern Art by Cornelia H. Butler and Alexandra Schwartz (2010).

EyeMinded: Living and Writing Contemporary Art by Kellie Jones (2011).

Women Building History: Public Art at the 1893 Columbian Exposition by Wanda M. Corn, Charlene G. Garfinkle, and Annelise K. Madsen (2011).

After the Revolution: Women Who Transformed Contemporary Art by Eleanor Heartney, Helaine Posner, Nancy Princenthal, Sue Scott, Linda Nochlin (2013).

Visualizing Guadalupe: From Black Madonna to Queen of the Americas by Jeanette Favrot Peterson (2014).

Live Form: Women, Ceramics, and Community by Jenni Sorkin (2016).


We want this list to grow, so please reblog with your favorite resources on art by women and feminist art.

I hate when people, especially white people act like anti-blackness is just an american thing and these “blacks are just overreacting” like no, anti blackness is global.. in brazil, the black brazilians are subjected to racism and mistreatment by society because of their skin. In the domincan republic, the dark/black dominincans (and haitans) are faced with racism by the lighter dominicans. In some asian countries, being mixed with black and inheriting your parent’s dark skin tone is seen as ugly. In some non-black cultures, non-american, black people are seen as the ‘devil’, or ‘witches’, etc. in predominately white countries filled with people who haven’t ever actually seen a black person, these people already conceive negative opinions about black people from the media they see. I could list MORE examples but I think I’ve gotten my point across.

Anti-blackness isn’t just an american thing, african americans aren’t the only black people who face racism for being black. Anti blackness is a universal thing that shouldn’t just be passed off as ‘oh, these black americans are too senstaive and want attention’.

I had a dream where the lions had corporeal holographic forms to interact with their Paladins. And it’s all hijinks and shenanigans [and Lance teasing Keith for how motherly Red is with him] until Shiro notices how generally unpleasant Red is with him.

At first he thinks nothing of it cause she seems just as dismissive towards the others, and Keith tries reassuring him that she’s just being herself. Until he brings up the whole leading Voltron subject with Keith again, then she’s a hissing growling menace and if it weren’t for Black and Keith, Shiro thinks he might have become her chew toy. Doesn’t help that all the lions can speak, cause everyone can hear Red calling him a “cub stealing meatsack”.

And of course he tries resolving the issue [can’t have problems in the Team, even if it lies between a Paladin and a lion that isn’t his]. But considering how temperamental and unstable the Red lion is? He doesn’t get a reasonable discussion “You want a successor? Fine! But don’t come sniffing at my cub’s direction and leaving him an anxious mess with your talk of potential death!” and really putting him on the spot and getting a faceful of sharp teeth “Funny how you feel absolutely fine with keeping this topic to yourself and Keith. Shouldn’t you be discussing this with the princess? After all, she seems like a more suitable candidate for Black, and I sure haven’t heard of my sister’s approval on the matter”. Then it’s just her dragging Keith away by the sleeve and him just turning to give Shiro a helpless look. 

ew.com
Brooklyn Nine-Nine to take on racial profiling with stop-and-frisk episode

Brooklyn Nine-Nine tends to take a light-hearted approach when it comes to the long arm of the law: After all, it’s a comedy in which Andy Samberg effuses lines like “Don’t worry, we can outsmart some small-town sheriff. We’re NYPD detectives. We caught the Son of Sam! Ice-T plays us on TV! We keep the Tonys safe!” But an upcoming episode is aiming to mine humor in a serious topic involving the police: Racial profiling via the controversial stop-and-frisk program, in which officers temporarily detain and search citizens for concealed weapons and illegal goods.

In an episode airing May 2 on Fox, Terry (Terry Crews) — a sergeant in the Nine-Nine — is subjected to a stop-and-frisk (which, coincidentally, is also known as a “Terry stop“) by an officer when he’s on the street looking for his daughter’s blankie. “He tries to work it out with the cop by going out to dinner with him, but that doesn’t work out, and he has to decide whether or not to file a formal complaint,” series co-creator Dan Goor tells EW. “To a certain extent, it’s the question of: Am I blue or am I black?”

It’s a subject matter that the show’s writers have been wanting to tackle for a long time, but “because our heroes are the police, it’s difficult to talk about the police in an abstract way,” says Goor. “We’ve talked about a million different stories and I think this one really works. It felt very natural and real, but at the same time, we’ve managed to make it as funny as any other Brooklyn Nine-Nine episode.”

The idea for the story stemmed from a conversation with Crews, who revealed a similar incident in which he had been racially profiled. The writers began working on an episode but were having trouble around the halfway mark. It was a conversation about the episode with a different cast member — Andre Braugher, a.k.a. Captain Holt — that led to a breakthrough moment. “Andre told me what he thought Captain Holt would do at that moment,” says Goor. “And it was like the clouds parted and I could see for the first time. It was so unexpected, but true to the character and honest, and made for an entire act’s worth of scenes.”

In the episode, after Terry hashes it out with other members of the Nine-Nine, “ultimately it comes down to a great set of scenes between Holt and [Terry],” says Goor. “It’s Andre at the height of Andre and Terry really keeps up with him. And it’s the first time we’ve done an A story for anyone other than Jake.”

Speaking of Jake (Samberg), he and Amy (Melissa Fumero) will spend most of the episode taking care of Terry’s twins with Sharon (Merrin Dungey) out of town. “They want to know why their dad was arrested, so Jake and Amy have to talk about these issues with these kids,” says Goor. “It’s one of the funniest stories we’ve done.”

DESMOND MILES DEFENSE SQUAD

Reblog and tag your username to the list if you love and defend our little precious babe Des.
Let’s show the AC fandom (and, of course, Ubisoft) that Desmond is loved too!

(‘Cause seriously, guys, I’m tired of the way both the AC fans and Ubisoft seem to ignore Desmond, who was the true main protagonist of the series). 

Give me “Gorgeous” characters with scars and stretch marks, characters who have keratosis pilaris or pigmentation problems, give me dark characters with rough skin and worked hands, characters whose beauty isn’t defined by soft pale skin.

So You Think You’re Not Racist

Alternate title: “Levels of Racism: Why White Fans and Creators Have a Responsibility to Confront Our Biases”

So here’s a thing I’ve been thinking about for a while. I’m pretty sure it’s nothing new and if anyone knows of resources written by Black people that address this, please send me the info because I definitely want to read them. 

(Also if I’ve misstepped or misspoken in any way, please let me know. Criticism is welcome.)

Part of the difficulty of discussing racism, particularly with other white people, is that we don’t actually think about the same thing when we talk about racism. The way I see it, there are three levels:

  1. Individual beliefs and actions that are rooted in racial prejudice
  2. Subconscious racial bias that comes from socialization
  3. Systemic racism enshrined in institutions of power

There are probably more in between, and obviously these aren’t strict black and white categories; there’s a lot of overlap and blurred lines involved. I don’t know if any particular level is worse than the others, and I don’t think I’m qualified to speak on that. But I think these work well as large bucket categories.

The problem is that often people are talking about different levels without actually realizing it. When I try to get my parents to understand why level 2 might lead them to judge Colin Kaepernick’s method of protest unfairly, they respond as if I’ve accused them of level 1 racism. When I tell my coworker that I don’t like the Bruins because the crowd booed PK Subban every time he had the puck, I can tell he’s desperately trying to come up with a reason other than race because he doesn’t want to accuse an entire stadium of people of being level 1 racists, when really the problem is probably a mix of 1 & 2.

And obviously, they’re all bad. They’re all racism and we should fight against all of them. But I think we have to fight against the different levels in different ways, which is why people get frustrated with these conversations.

Keep reading

I have the deepest affection for intellectual conversations. The ability to sit and talk about life, love, anything, and everything just intrigues me. If we can both share opinions on subjects and not feel like one of our opinions is better than the other and just talk; that’s a beautiful thing to me. 💕

How the black community reacts when black women are subjected to racism...

The comments are filled with endless laughter, asking why she’s crying and she’s overreacting. 

When fans threw bananas at those black soccer players nobody made light of, people were outraged especially black men like the one’s laughing at this woman.

I don’t care how funny you think something is, if you see a black woman traumatized it shouldn’t immediately make you burst into laughter.

That proves how little people care about black women. That’s why I wish black women would stop acting like mules and labor machines for everybody, including our community.

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Spoiler Room: Scoop on 'Game of Thrones,' 'Blue Bloods,' 'NCIS: LA' and more
Welcome to the Spoiler Room, a safe place for spoiler addicts to come on a weekly basis to learn what’s coming next on their favorite shows and, hopefully, get a few of their own questions answered…

Is there anything you can share about the new season of Arrow? — Marco
Expect a lot of scoop in that department very soon, but here’s a little tidbit to hold you over: I hear Black Canary will be getting a new love interest this season. “I would say yes for that, but I’m not going to tell you with who, because that’s a fun story we’re very excited about,” EP Wendy Mericle tells me. Despite what seemed like the instant chemistry between them, Mericle nixed one candidate. “Not Diggle,” she says. “That’s what’s so much fun.”

“I’m only human can’t you see,

I made-I made a mistake,

Please just look me in my face,

Tell me everything’s okay”

I forgot ugly flower fairy was a character that exists but then I remembered and it made me so mad so now you have to remember too

(oh look, lore↓!)

Keep reading

“We have a job as Black women to support whatever is right and to bring in justice where we’ve had so much injustice.” – Fannie Lou Hamer

HERStory Matters: Civil and voting rights activist Fannie Lou Hamer was born on October 6, 1917.

Born Fannie Lou Townsend in rural Montgomery County, MS, she was the youngest of 20 children born to Jim and Ella Townsend, poor sharecroppers, who found it hard to provide proper food and clothing for their children. When she was six years old she joined her family in the fields picking cotton and dropped out of school by the time she was in the third grade.

When she was 16, she caught polio which made it hard for her to work in the fields. When Marlow (her boss) found out that Fannie Lou could read and write, he made her the time and record keeper for the plantation in addition to cooking and cleaning his house.

In 1945, at the age of 27, Fannie Lou married Perry “Pap” Hamer who was a tractor driver on the Marlow farm. They had no children of their own. Fannie Lou went to the hospital to find out why she could not conceive and was told she had a tumor. She wasn’t told that they performed a hysterectomy on her that day but was later told by the doctor that it was done out of kindness. Fannie Lou was outraged. As a result, the Hamers adopted 4 children, 2 girls and 2 boys who were all from very poor families.

On one fateful day, while walking by the Ruleville, Mississippi town center, Fannie Lou saw a sign posted by the Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and decided to investigate. She was 37 years old at the time and was ripe for expressing her outrage over the conditions she and other blacks were subjected to in this rural community. She joined the SNCC and worked as a field worker on the voter registration committee. The committee worked on preparing blacks to read and write so they could register to vote.

Seventeen people tried to register and were turned back one day. When Marlow was informed of the drive to register, he threatened Fannie Lou and her family with expulsion from the plantation on which they worked. She left that night and stayed with friends but it wasn’t long before her location was discovered and she and her friends were shot at that night by the KKK.

She strongly believed that blacks could change their conditions, both political and economic, if they could vote for the candidates who would best serve them. Fannie Lou studied with the Southern Free School along with other potential voters and passed the voter registration test on her third try.

In 1963, the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP) was formed because no help from the Federal Government regarding the right to vote was apparently coming. The party registered
60,000 new black voters across the state of Mississippi. Delegates from the party were sent to the 1964 Democratic Convention in Atlantic City, New Jersey where they challenged the seating of the Mississippi delegation.

Fannie Lou took the opportunity to describe to the convention, and to the world, the horrific way she was treated after they left the voter registration workshop in Charleston, South Carolina in June 1963. She said that on the way home, they were hungry and wanted to stop at a Trailways bus terminal in Winona, Mississippi for food. Fannie Lou decided to stay on the bus while the others went into the terminal. They were not served but were arrested. She was also arrested. She was taken out of her jail cell and taken to another cell and there, under the orders of a State Highway Patrol officer, was battered by two Negro prisoners with a police blackjack. The first prisoner beat her until he was exhausted. The law enforcement officer then ordered the second prisoner to beat her. It was three days before members of SNCC were allowed to take her to the hospital.

Fannie Lou told the convention that as a result of this beating, she suffered permanent kidney damage, a blood clot in the artery of her left eye, and a limp when she walked. Her riveting testimony to the convention, which was interrupted by a hastily called speech by President Johnson, informed the country about the treatment blacks were receiving at the hands of whites in the state of Mississippi and the rest of the south.

Fannie Lou’s involvement widened as she ran for Congress in the Mississippi state Democratic primary in 1964. She was unsuccessful in that run but she went on to appear at rallies and visit colleges and universities around the country to speak to students. She led the cotton pickers resistance movement in 1965 and was instrumental in helping to bring a Head Start program to her hometown of Ruleville, MS. Mrs. Hamer was also famous for her rich singing voice which she used often to soothe tensions and to fortify herself spiritually. She sang “This Little Light of Mine” and other spirituals to calm others during marches and critical events.

Fannie Lou was a Democratic National Committee Representative from 1968-1971. She ran for the Mississippi State Senate in 1971 and was a delegate to the Democratic National Convention in 1972.

In 1972, a unanimous resolution praising Fannie Lou’s statewide and national contribution to civil rights was passed by the Mississippi House of Representatives. Other awards came her way as the courageous work she undertook was recognized. She received honorary PhDs from several universities including Howard University.

Fannie Lou Hamer died in the hospital at Mound Bayou, Mississippi on March 14, 1977, of heart problems, hypertension, and breast cancer.

Learn more about Fannie Lou Hamer through several books and recordings, available athttp://amzn.to/2dPfWWE. Watch a trailer for an upcoming documentary about her life, “Fannie Lou Hamer’s America,” at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4SzxJuCs_nU.