black liberation

The villains here aren’t southern rednecks or neo-Nazi skinheads, or the so-called “alt-right”. They’re middle-class white liberals. The kind of people who read this website. The kind of people who shop at Trader Joe’s, donate to the ACLU and would have voted for Obama a third time if they could. Good people. Nice people. Your parents, probably. The thing Get Out does so well – and the thing that will rankle with some viewers – is to show how, however unintentionally, these same people can make life so hard and uncomfortable for black people. It exposes a liberal ignorance and hubris that has been allowed to fester. It’s an attitude, an arrogance which in the film leads to a horrific final solution, but in reality leads to a complacency that is just as dangerous.
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While the US military was invading and terrorizing the people of Korea in the early 1950s, the Korean and Chinese People’s Armies reached out to Black soldiers in the invading army: 

“Did you ever stop to think why you should be in Korea, fighting other colored people, while lynchings, murders and insults pile up against the Negro people at home?”

Half of Korea was already occupied by the US. And in the other half, carpet bombing campaigns killed millions of people, including Korean civilians and children. The Koreans however, under the leadership of comrade Kim Il Sung, never wavered in their commitment to revolutionary socialist internationalism. 

They spoke TO the Black soldiers, whom they understood were also oppressed by the white supremacist US invading force: “We are not trying to turn you against the white soldiers. They are in the same boat as you. They are sent here to be killed for the Big Money, for Big Business profits like you are. We think that you, having been oppressed, can understand this more quickly than they do. But many of them are beginning to understand it too. […] Americans, black and white, unite and fight for peace!

"The Chinese and Koreans are fighting for their own homes and borders. We didn’t come five thousand miles across the sea to fight. We didn’t come to America with guns and bombs and we never will. Don’t risk your lives here. Ask to go home where you can fight for your own rights as a human being. Leave us at peace in our homes here. 

“Your friends, The Korean People’s Army; The Chinese People’s Volunteers”

look, my pals. liberalism doesn’t mean leftist. liberalism isn’t a good thing. liberals absolutely are the ones preaching nonviolence against nazis. liberalism is not good. black bloc isn’t liberals. they DO NOT affiliate themselves with liberalism.

//do not conflate the two things.//

anarcho-communist isn’t liberal, communist isn’t liberal, socialist isn’t liberal, marxist isn’t liberal. 

liberal isn’t a catch all term for leftism, it’s actually not even considered leftist at all. Again: liberalism isn’t considered leftism at all

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[history creed dust]
[edits made by me :)]

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[nothing is true everything is permitted]
[edits made by me :)]

Malcolm X & Ho Chi Minh, ¡presente!

We celebrate on May 19 the birthdays of two world-bending revolutionaries, Ho Chi Minh and Malcolm X.

Born in 1890 in central Vietnam, Ho Chi Minh was the Marxist-Leninist communist who forged and led a people’s movement and army that defeated the invading imperialist might of both France and the United States and ultimately liberated Vietnam from colonialism.

Born in 1925 in the U.S., Malcolm X was the African-American leader who raised to global attention the concepts of Black nationalism, Black self-defense and the right of self-determination of Black peoples. Malcolm X also made a major contribution to the global movement for Pan-Africanism.

Neither met the other, yet their deeds and words intertwine, and together they continue to inspire us toward revolution.

At this moment, as the U.S. ruling class fans the deadly fires of racist hatred, Malcolm X and Ho Chi Minh unite to give a profound lesson in building international solidarity with oppressed people and nations.