black hawk

Rust Ride

I brushed my hair to the left, and looked into the carousel eyes.

The aqueous humour thrumming with outdated soundtracks

And the hair blown around by rust bucket rides

And Mattel personalities coupled with Neo Wiccan

Beliefs in third wave entitlement and THC domineering

Commentary.  I listened to endless bullshit radiating through the year

From spinning carnival mechanics and rigged games.

Winning cupie compliments and oversized order bills.

Half-assed witchcraft resounding from a fucking Black Hawk planting

The seeds that would bear the bitter fruits of bumper car hatred and

Petting zoo liaisons.  If we still had a connection of which to speak then I

Would say with no hesitation that you wasted my popcorn and Skittles

And Monday Mischief.  Sharing beds with those bearing choke marks

From uterul necklaces cinched too tight.  Extinguishing pyromaniacal fantasies

Under the thin veil of “just getting along” and the mask of “can’t the past be the past.”

Apathy.  Pacifism.  Perpetual.  Routine.  Placebo.  Bandage.  Costume. Circular.

Are these the words of momentum and climax?

The only momentum to be seen is those on fair rides that spin in endless tornados.

Is it any wonder that we look at each other clouded with motion sickness?

Our vomit is our late-night conversations.  Our nausea is our appearance.

One woman’s peace is another man’s war, and her cast is his burden.

Her sling is his ball and chain, her medicine is his impetus to rage.

Fuck your hill.  There was nothing at the crest. 

Fuck your past for not having a future.

Fuck your present for being wrapped incorrectly. 

Fuck the falsity of shape.

Fuck you for allowing it to look human.

You should’ve stayed in North Fuck.

written by Ricky Rooster

Tarantula Hawk Wasp

Not exclusive to the Mojave but very prevalent here and in the Sonoran Desert.

It’s a wasp that mainly eats nectar and fruit juice. They’re very docile with yet black bodies and bright orange wings. 

They spend the majority of their life eating sugary fluids and are pretty easy going. There aren’t too many animals that prey on them, their orange wings are though to serve as a warning to ward off birds from eating them like the Monarch Butterfly. 

However when it’s time to reproduce the male inseminates the female then the female finds a Tarantula and stabs them with her stinger. The venom of the Tarantula Hawk Wasp is the second most painful venom in the animal kingdom just under the Bullet Ant. The venom overloads the Tarantula’s nervous system and puts it in a permanent coma. She digs a burrow or finds a burrow, drags her newly comatose Tarantula into it. Injects them with her eggs and seals it up then flies off. Few weeks later the larva eat their way out  from the inside and the Tarantula is alive until the end. They then become wasps and fly off to repeat the cycle of eating then killing for reproduction.

They can get pretty large but generally are only half this size. This is one of the larger specimens collected. 

Coyote Peterson got stung by one and captured it on youtube.

I’ve also wanted to experience this for about a decade just to see how bad it is. The effect of the venom really only lasts about ten minutes at the most but it pretty much removes your capability to do anything except scream. 

Chris Evans

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see how his chest kinda rise up at the end? so cute <3

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Chris Evans

10

Ask Ethan: What Happens When A Black Hole’s Singularity Evaporates?

“What happens when a black hole has lost enough energy due to hawking radiation that its energy density no longer supports a singularity with an event horizon? Put another way, what happens when a black hole ceases to be a black hole due to hawking radiation?”

One of the most puzzling things about Black Holes is that if you wait around long enough, they’ll evaporate completely. The curved spacetime outside of the event horizon still undergoes quantum effects, and when you combine General Relativity and quantum field theory in exactly that fashion, you get a blackbody spectrum of thermal radiation out. Given enough time, a black hole will decay away completely. But what will that entail? Will an event horizon cease to exist, exposing a former black hole’s core? Will it persist right until the final moment, indicative of a true singularity? And how hot and energetic will that final evaporative state be?

Incredibly, even without a quantum theory of gravity, we can predict the answers! Find out on this week’s Ask Ethan.

unstablestar  asked:

Can black holes die? if not, then is it possible for black holes to continue merging and expanding until all matter in the universe is pulled into one big massive black hole? if black holes can die then what happens with the matter that has been pulled in by the gravitational force? would a white hole then be produced after the black hole dies?

Black holes can, in fact, die! The way they die, however, is theoretical and not proven, but it’s possible and it’s called Hawking radiation. To summarize // oversimplify (because it’s really complicated), according to quantum physics we know that particle-antiparticle pairs pop in and out of existence all the time, and usually annihilate each other almost immediately. They are able to come into existence by “borrowing” energy from the universe, and when they annihilate they “return” that energy back.

Now, what if a particle-antiparticle pair comes into being right at the edge of a black hole’s event horizon, and one particle falls in and the other escapes? Well, now you’ve just “created” one particle that’s entered the universe, and one particle that’s entered the black hole (and can’t escape). Since these two particles can’t annihilate, they can’t “return” their borrowed energy to the universe. However, you can’t just spontaneously create energy; it has to come from somewhere. That somewhere is, you guessed it, the black hole. So, the amount of energy in the black hole decreases by the amount of energy required to create the particle-antiparticle pair. Since mass and energy are equivalent (e=mc2), the mass of the black hole decreases ever so slightly - the mass of an electron, positron, or other subatomic particle. 

This process takes billions of years, and it will be another several billion years before we’re able to see black holes finish evaporating. This process is expected to be faster the smaller the black hole is - once a black hole is small enough, this process happens faster and faster, until the black hole gives off lots and lots of radiation and “explodes” (think: gamma rays, really bright, as bright or brighter than a supernova), and no longer exists. While this isn’t proven and is entirely theoretical, it’s pretty cool that black holes, the killers of the universe from which nothing should be able to escape, are slowly losing mass over billions and trillions of years, one subatomic mass at a time.