black girl fiction

If I ever have a daughter, she won’t grow up with stories about princesses being saved by princes. No, she’ll grow up with tales of queens who saved themselves and the world at the same time.

I’ll tell her about Natasha Romanoff, who didn’t let her past define her.
I’ll tell her about Bobbi Morse, who took no bullshit from anyone.
I’ll tell her about Wanda Maximoff, who was powerful in every way possible.
I’ll tell her about Peggy Carter, who decided her own worth.
I’ll tell her about Hermione Granger, who knew the power of knowledge.
I’ll tell her about Ginny Weasley, who didn’t let anyone tell her what she couldn’t do.
I’ll tell her about Luna Lovegood, who knew that being a bit crazy isn’t always a bad thing.

You can say what you like about the young people of today, but you have to admit

We’re going to be damn good storytellers

OMG 7,000 words this is a long fic, guess I’m not getting any sleep tonight
—  Me when I first started ready fanfic and thought that 10,000 was the longest fic ever and didn’t know shit

LGBT History Month - Lesbian Fiction

  • Oranges are Not the Only Fruit, by Jenette Winterson
  • Trumpet, by Jackie Kay
  • Tipping the Velvet, by Sarah Waters
  • The Well of Loneliness, by Radclyffe Hall
  • Curious Wine, by Katherine V. Forest
  • The Black and White of It, by Ann Allen Shockley
  • The Girl on the Stairs, by Louise Welsh
  • Kissing the Witch, by Emma Donoghue
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Young Adult Books with Black Protagonists

The Diamond Thief (1) by J.A. Mclachlan

On his deathbed, Kia’s father discloses a secret to her alone: a magnificent diamond he has been hiding for years. Fearing he stole it, she too keeps it secret. She learns it comes from the distant colonized planet of Malem, where her father caught the illness that eventually killed him. Now she is even more convinced he stole it, as it is illegal for any off-worlder to possess a Malemese diamond.
When 16-yr-old Kia is training to be a translator, she is co-opted by a series of events into travelling as a translator to Malem. Using her skill in languages and another skill she picked up after her father s death, the skill of picking locks - she unravels the secret of the mysterious gem and learns what she must do to set things right: return the diamond to its original owner. But how will she find out who that is when no one can know that she, an off-worlder, has a Malemese diamond?

The Salarian Desert Game (2) by J.A. Mclachlan

What if someone you love gambled on her life?

Games are serious business on Salaria, and the stakes are high. When Kia’s older sister, in a desperate bid to erase their family debt, loses the game and forfeits her freedom, Kia is determined to rescue her.

Disguised as a Salarian, Kia becomes Idaro in order to move freely in this dangerous new culture. When she arrives on Salaria, she learns it’s a world where a few key players control the board, and the pawns are ready to revolt. Kia joins the conflict, risking everything to save her sister. As if she doesn’t already have enough to handle, Agatha, the maddeningly calm and unpredictable Select who lives life both by-the-book and off-the-cuff shows up to help, along with handsome Norio, a strong-willed desert girl with her own agenda, and a group of Salarian teens earning their rite of passage in the treacherous desert game.

What can an interpreter and former thief possibly do in the midst of all this to keep the people she loves alive? 

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I wanted to share this with you guys. Last summer I tried to kickstart my book. I put my everything into my kickstarter campaign. I had a flyer made and everything. My project was featured on several different blogs and I had a pretty fierce marketing campaign. I even paid for one of those kickstarter advertisment things where they will tweet and post about your campaign every single day. Despite all of that I only raised $671 dollars in 30 days. I was completly distraught. I was so upset with myself. I had all of these posters in my room and a stack of bookmarks,the only printout I could afford to produce were my bookmarks. I left my manuscript and all of my kickstarter stuff alone for a long time. I couldnt even look at it. I cant pin point when it happened but I decided to try agian. My heart had healed and I felt like I should try agian. I had no idea what was going to happen but I knew I would never know unless I tried. I learned from my mistakes and I relaunched my project on Indiegogo. Last night was the final night for my project and not only did I reach my goal but I raised extra money as well. I hope that anyone reading this who’s a creative person will gain strength from this. If you fail the first time,its ok! You can try agian! Regroup yourself,keep networking,keep trying new things and when you feel better try agian. You never know what will happen if you try agian. I did and now I’m in the process of publishing my first scifi novel as an e-book.

For Colored Girls: Depiction of Black Womanhood

“Somebody, anybody, sing a black girl’s song. Bring her out to know herself to know you.”

From Ntozake Shange’s For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow is Enuf.

You know what’s made me happy lately? It’s all the differing depictions of Black womanhood that’s been in the media lately. From upcoming shows and movies, to programs that have already currently awaiting a new season (or have sadly been cancelled, like Still Star Crossed). 

Allow me to explain. 

I saw Thor Ragnarok with my sister. Now, I’m not really a Thor fan, but I was beyond hyped to see this movie simply for Tessa Thompson. I wouldn’t call myself a Trekkie by any means (I do love Star Trek DS9 though) but I love Michael Burnham in Discovery (and I love the fact that this show focuses on a Black woman who has a background in the sciences). I love Misty Knight in Luke Cage. My sister and I watched the first episode of Issa Rae’s Insecure recently, and I marveled at the writing and the characters of Issa and Molly. I’m beyond hyped for the Nakia, Shuri, Okoye, Queen Ramonda and the rest of the Dora Milaje in Black Panther. I can’t wait to see Thunder and Lightning in the new Black Lightning TV series, and Iris West in the upcoming Flash movie (honestly Kiersey Clemons should never have been cut from the Justice League movie, but that’s a rant for another time.) 

It’s great to see little black boys dressed up as Falcon, Black Panther, Luke Cage, etc, but it’s just as important, if not more so, to see little Black girls dressed like Valkyrie, dressed like Shuri, dressed like Storm or Vixen. I hope that Michael Burnham as just as much impact on Black girls and Black women as Benjamin Sisko had on me. 

I love that media, lately, has taken to singing “Black girls’ songs” because black women have always been the backbone of the Black community. And I hope it can continue because Black women/girls deserve all the positive representation in the world.  

Black girls (just like Black boys) are seeing that there isn’t one way to be a black person. That black womanhood is made up of differing ideas, politics, feelings and emotions, and each one of them is valid. 

That’s an important thing for our community, and I’m glad its being spotlighted. I’m glad we have directors like Ava Duvernay who chose to have Meg Murray be a Black girl. I’m glad we have movies like 2014′s Annie with Quevenzhane Wallis who showed that Black girlhood is something that’s just as innocent and hopeful as anything else. I’m glad we have The Wiz Live with Shanice Williams, Queen Latifah, Amber Riley, Mary J Blige, and Uzo Aduba to show off the multiplicity and magic (yes, actual fucking magic) of Black women. I’m glad we have Laverne Cox, because her mere presence on screen is a validation for Black Trans Women who rarely see themselves in a positive light. I’m glad we have Riri Williams and her presence in the Iron Man narrative, just like I’m glad for the wild success of Hidden Figures, and I’m super excited for Taraji P Henson’s Proud Mary. 

I’m here for any kind of representation for Black women because it’s needed now more than ever. 

Mark your calenders everybody! September 21st is the day that I’m going to launch my campaign to rsise funds for my afrofuturitic,mystery,scifi novel “Cosmic Callisto Caprica & The Missing Rings Of Saturn”.

Young Adult Books with Black Protagonists

Orleans by Sherri L. Smith

After a string of devastating hurricanes and a severe outbreak of Delta Fever, the Gulf Coast has been quarantined. Years later, residents of the Outer States are under the assumption that life in the Delta is all but extinct… but in reality, a new primitive society has been born.

Fen de la Guerre is living with the O-Positive blood tribe in the Delta when they are ambushed. Left with her tribe leader’s newborn, Fen is determined to get the baby to a better life over the wall before her blood becomes tainted. Fen meets Daniel, a scientist from the Outer States who has snuck into the Delta illegally. Brought together by chance, kept together by danger, Fen and Daniel navigate the wasteland of Orleans. In the end, they are each other’s last hope for survival.