black gemstone

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Black Opal is Australia’s national gemstone, and black opal is the rarest and most valuable of its kind, at times selling at prices that rival the best diamonds. The stone must have a rich, black background, but base colors come in all shades of gray, which is why opinions vary on what is a “true” black opal. Found in the Lightning Ridge area in northwestern New South Wales, black opals are natural, solid stones that absorb scattered white light, giving it brilliant spectral colors. (Source)

List of gender neutral names with meanings and origins:

So, I was going to send this as a message to @oabuckvu, but instead I thought I’d post this here since others may also find it helpful!

A:

Addison- child of Adam- English
Adina- slender- Hebrew
Alby- from Alba- Latin
Ally- friend- English
Ash- ash tree clearing- English
Azra- pure- Israeli
Asa- physician- Hebrew
Arin- enlightened- Hebrew
Arlo- army, hill- old English or barberry tree- Spanish
Avery- elf ruler- English
Alex- defender of mankind- Greek
Arlen- promise, oath- Irish
Ambrose- immortal- Latin
Aspen- tree- English
August- dignity, vulnerable- German

B:

Blaine- yellow- Scottish
Blake- blonde, dark- English
Bryce- swift- Celtic
Brooklyn- broken land- English
Bradley- clearing in a woods- English
Bailey- bailiff- English
Beck- brook, stream- Norse

C:

Chyler- beloved- English
Cody- child of cuidightheach- English
Charlie- charles- English
Chris- christ- English
Coby- supplanter- Latin
Casey- brave- Gaelic
Corin- spear bearer- Irish
Cameron- crooked nose- Scottish
Colby- town, dark- Norse

D:

Dakota- friend- Native American
Devon- poet- Irish
Delaney- descendent of the challenger- Irish
Drew- manly- English
Denham- habitation- English
Dael- knowledge of God- Hebrew
Danny- God has judged- Scottish

E:

Ellis- Jehova is God- Greek
Ellery- from the elder tree island- English
Evan- youth warrior- Irish
Emery- brave, powerful- German
Eden- delight- Hebrew
Ellison- child of elder- English

F:

Farron- iron grey- Anglo Saxon
Freddie- peaceful ruler- German
Frankie- free one- French
Fynn- river in Ghana- African
Finch- bird- English
Flynn- child of red hair- Irish

G:

Gene- well born- English
Gale- cheerful, pleasant- English
Glade- shining- English
Glen- valley- Gaelic

H:

Hollis- Holly tree dweller- English
Harlow- rock, army, hill- English
Halley- lived near a grove- English
Hadley- Heather field- English

I:

Isa- devoted to God- Teutonic
Ives- archers bow- English
Iggy- firey one- English

J:

Juniper- youth producing, evergreen- Latin
Jesse- gift- Hebrew
Jo- God is gracious- English/German/French
Joey- may Jehova add- Hebrew
Jordan- river flow- Macedonian
Jet- black gemstone- German

K:

Kellam- at the ridges- Norse
Kelsey- from the ships island- English
Kendall- royal valley- English
Kai- sea- Hawaii

L:

Logan- hollow- Scottish
Leslie- garden of holly- Scottish
Lee- dweller near the wood- English
Lane- path- English
Luca- bringer of light- Italy
Lirit- poetic- Hebrew
Lex- defender- Greek
Lakota- friends- Siouan

M:

Mattie- strength in battle- German
Morgan- sea defender- English
Misha- God live- Russia
Max- greatest- Latin
Mattise- gift of god- French
Monroe- from the mouth of the river Roe- Irish

N:

Newlyn- from the new spring- Celtic
Noel- Christmas- French
Nicky- victory- English
Nat- gift of god- English
Nova- chases butterfly- Native American

O:

Oakley- from the oak tree meadow- English
Oak- tree- English

P:

Perry- dwells by the pear tree- English
Piper- one who plays the pipe- Scandinavian
Pema- lotus- Tibetan
Puck- unknown meaning- Dutch
Parker- park keeper- English

Q:

Quinn- fifth- Irish
Quinta- fifth- Spanish

R:

Reese- firey- Welsh
Rey- king- Spanish
Reed- red, clearing- English
Rune- secret- Norse
Rue- herb, regret- English
Rain- blessings- American
Riley- dweller by the Rye field- English
River- river- English
Rowan- red- Gaelic
Rory- red king- Gaelic
Ronson- child of ron- English

S:

Sawyer- cuts timber- Celtic
Stevie- crown- English
Shiloh- owner- Hebrew
Sage- wise one- French
Saxon- knife- Teutonic
Sammy- bright sun- Finnish
Scout- to listen- French
Shane- gift from God- Irish

T:

Tex- texas- American
Toni- worthy of praise- Latin
Theo- God given- Greek
Taylor- to cut- French
Tyne- a river in england- English
Tyler- maker of tiles- English
Terry- powerful ruler- English

U:

Umber- shade- French

W:

Wyatt- guide- English
Willow- graceful- English
Wynne- fair- English
Wren- song bird- English

X:

Xen- religious- Japanese

Y:

Yael- mountain goat- Hebrew

Z:

Zen- meditative state- Japanese

One of the most beautifully unique kyanite cluster I have ever seen.

Nepal 

Color: Blue to blue-black, sometimes streaked; also white, green or gray

Luster: Mother of pearl, vitreous

Hardness: 4-7 (Depending on directional stress)

System: Triclinic

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Little Australian opal galaxies from @keithcler. 🌌

Made with Instagram

A short post on the most underrepresented eye color in fiction and the most common eye color in the world.

Shades of Brown

  • Gold
  • Amber
  • Russet
  • Tawny
  • Fawn
  • Copper
  • Chestnut
  • Rust
  • Sepia
  • Umber
  • Copper
  • Caramel
  • Ebony
  • Inky black

Things that are Shades of Brown

  • Whiskey/beer (gold)
  • Wood (range from light brown to black)
  • Chocolate (mid to dark brown)
  • Coffee (pale gold to black)
  • Henna (reddish brown)
  • Bronze (light brown)
  • Afternoon sunlight (gold)
  • Obsidian (black)
  • Animals (and their eyes)
  • Earth (wet earth = dark brown, red clay = reddish brown, wet sand = light brown)
  • Ink (black)
  • Topaz gemstone (orange to dark brown)
  • Leather (mid to dark brown)

Brown Associations

  • Autumn or winter: Brown, an earth tone, is closely associated with dead plants, which are brown and not very romantic. You can link this to the smell of woodsmoke, bark, or new snow; the taste of frost or hot chocolate; the sight of bare branches and southward-flying birds; the touch of warm sweaters or rake handles; the sound of crunching leaves or fire crackling.
  • Earth: Again, brown is an earth tone. You can link this to petrichor, the smell of flowers, animals, or water; the taste of crisp cold air or freshwater; the sight of fresh soil, stones, bark, or a low-slung, comfortable cabin; the touch of rain, leather, dirt, or fur; the sound of birds calling, rain falling, plants rustling
  • Alcohol: Most liquor is gold or brown. You can link this to the smell of alcohol and a well-packed bar; the taste of ice, glass, garnish, and alcohol; the sight of a polished bar, a half-empty glass/mug, and the shotgun resting below the bar; the touch of a mild buzz, an arm through yours, or the mild jostling as you find a barstool; and the sound of barroom buzz, a pool table, jazz music, and pouring drinks.
  • Animals: Many animals - predator and prey - have brown or golden eyes. You can link this to the smell of (wet) fur; the taste of cold wind, blood, or plants; the sight of moving branches, unblinking eyes, feathers shining in the sun, and fur ruffling in the breeze; the touch of the ground beneath your bare feet, branches whipping along beside you, and the weather; and the sounds of panting/breathing, or soft footfalls or wing beats.
  • Material: Brown is a tactile color, bringing with it the touch of copper or velvet or hemp or satin in addition to the hue. You can link this to the smell of metal, wet fabric, or hemp; the taste of blood (sometimes described as coppery) or champagne at a luxurious event; the sight of a richly decorated bed, a burnished weapon or set of buttons, or a lovely gown; the touch of cold metal, soft velvet, or course fur; and the sounds of rubbing fur, rustling fabric, and chiming metal.
  • Blackness: This is for all the very dark-eyed people out there who appear not to have irises at all. You can link this to the smell of a cold night or of rock; the taste of regret, lies, or red wine; the sight of raven’s wings, obsidian, flickering shadows, mourners at a funeral, coals, and endless pits; the sensation of being about to fall into a hole, the secret thrill of illicit behavior, nothingness, warmth, or compelling mystery; and the sounds of murmured conversations, rustling feathers, and drowsiness.
  • Old Things: When I think of brown, I think of all of the above, yes, but I also think of old houses and antiques. Maybe because old houses tend to use wood paneling and because paper yellows as it ages? You can link this to the smell of old books, white-out, India ink, mildew, wood polish, and paper; the taste of musty paper, dust, and history; the sight of fireplaces, antique globes, solemn old portraits, overflowing bookshelves, and overstuffed, tatty armchairs; the feeling of a comfortable chair, paper between your fingers, warmth, and familiarity; and the sounds of a crackling fire, an old house settling after a storm, turning pages, and a scratching pen.
  • Warmth: The brown found in brown eyes is a warm, comforting color. You can link this to the smell of warm earth and a full house; the taste of hot summer days; the sight of dust motes swirling in the air, golden sunlight arcing across the ground at morning or dusk, and wood in the fireplace; the feeling of mild warmth from sunlight filtering through treetops; and the sounds of birds singing or quiet conversation.

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