black folklore

my fave bit of black dog folklore is that in some folklore there is a belief that the first person buried in a cemetery stays there and doesn’t cross over and helps other spirits move on and protects them from evil spirits, now naturally people want to avoid this fate for their loved ones and themselves so they would sometimes bury a dog first and it would return in the shape of a big black dog and protect the newly dead from evil spirits and occasionally the living as well

this kind of spirit is called a church grim

Name: Barghest, Barguest

Area of Origin: Northern England

Prevalent in Northern English folklore, the Barghest is a monstrous black dog, with fiery eyes, large teeth and claws, though the name has been known to refer to ghosts or household elves in other regions of the country. The word “Ghost” was pronounced “Guest” in Northern England, and the etymology of Barghest is thought to be the combination word, Burh-ghest or “Town-Ghost”. Similar to other mythical Black Dogs like the Black Shuck, Grim, Padfoot, Gwyllgi and Gytrash, the Barghest is believed to be an omen of death, foretelling the passing of an individual by laying on or near their doorstep. In some tales, the dog is but one form the entity can shapeshift into, with other appearances being that of a headless man or woman, a white cat or a rabbit. They are said to attack lone travelers in the countryside as well as the narrow alleys in those of the old English cities.

Anubis Aesthetic

Like many ancient Egyptian deities, Anubis assumed different roles in various contexts. Depicted as a protector of graves as early as the First Dynasty (c. 3100 – c. 2890 BC), Anubis was also an embalmer. One of his prominent roles was as a god who ushered souls into the afterlife. He attended the weighing scale during the “Weighing of the Heart,” in which it was determined whether a soul would be allowed to enter the realm of the dead. Despite being one of the most ancient and “one of the most frequently depicted and mentioned gods” in the Egyptian pantheon, Anubis played almost no role in Egyptian myths. Anubis was depicted in black, a color that symbolized both rebirth and the discoloration of the corpse after embalming. His female counterpart is Anput. His daughter is the serpent goddess Kebechet.

The Exacting Art of Wand Making


“The magical rod is the verendum of the magus; it must not even be mentioned in any clear and precise manner; no one should boast of its possession, nor should its consecration ever be transmitted except under the conditions of absolute discretion and confidence.” - Eliphas Levi, “Dogme et Rituel de la Haute Magie” (1856)


It is a matter of fact that properly making a wand is a pain in the ass. It is a rather long process, with lots of detailed steps, none of which can be skipped. It takes more than a month of near daily work, invariably leads to both accidental and purposeful blood spill, not to mention all the mess.

Having lived in London for over a decade I can assure you that there is no Ollivanders in which to purchase a finished wand. And while many many sticks that have been nicely polished, often having had some baubles attached to them, are for sale from a variety of vendors they are not in any practical way a wand.

A wand must be cut by the practitioner themselves directly from the tree, must be worked to shape by the practitioner’s hands, tooled by the practitioner’s blade. It is a very necessary tool in the arsenal of witch and wizard alike, found throughout history in the practice of magic.

On the whole its a bothersome process; messy, meticulous, exacting and often tiresome. But at each point where you would shirk the necessary steps it is only in reminding yourself that the tool you make may save your life that you push on, doing every little bit that is needed to make it as strong as possible. Because like a parachute your life may hang in the balance of your wand having been made in an exacting process that I would personally never trust to something I bought online or in a shop.

The length of the wand varies from culture to culture and use to use. I myself prefer a length that is the distance from one’s nose when looking straight ahead to the tip of one’s fingers. Approximately three feet long (four spans) though tailored exactly to the body of its owner. The perfect length for tracing a circle on the ground without bending over.

It so happens that I had long held off on making myself a second hazel wand, my first being in storage in the US and something I had used for decades - though not seen in years. In its stead I have been using a very nice rowan wand I constructed about a year after I arrived in London, which works for most situations and is particularly adept at landscape magics. But then there are some things for which only a hazel wand will do the job properly.

Unfortunately my original hazel, cut from a deep and old wood in the states when I was a young man, has gone missing. Its whereabouts are a mystery, though where it should have been among my library storage materials it was not. Thus I have been slowly getting around to replacing it, and some near future work that needs doing has required my starting in order to finish before the vernal equinox.

So while the blackbird sang me a song of predawn delight I cut the hazel and have begun the process. As it dries I will gather the bits I need, offerings and ointments for its preparation, and by the first day of spring it should be ready for a bit of that old black magic.

The Role of Discovery on the Path


When we start on the Path we often hardly even know. It is already below our feet by the time we have any idea what it is, and we are often years before we have any idea where it is going. Yet it is there, taking us someplace, showing us the thin places in the Veil, revealing to us vistas and hollows hardly known to the world of men. Again and again throughout our lives constructing seemingly impossible narratives to push and pull us into the necessary changes for growth. The Path is the plot that runs through our lives.

Where we linger on that path often decides how long our journey takes between its start and its end. How well we perceive that which is off the edges of our path is a good indicator of how far along we are in our journey.

As much as a thousand writers and bloggers would have you otherwise it is most important to spend a great deal of time alone in the path of discovery. Without the books and theories, without the rhymes and reasons. Most of all without the jabbering idiocy of social commitment and simpering personal dramas known as the coven, or these days the facebook group. Just oneself and some bits and bobs that you know somehow happen to fit into that puzzle called hex, that whisper called curse, that promise called charm. Out in the landscape, looking for the variables we need, knowing which paths that cross are the chosen. Feeling innately that the grove is correct for the operation at hand.

The modern world is made of soft minds who seek constant guidance and desire to travel well worn paths that have been laid before them without thorn nor rose. Those paths may even lead to darkness and delight, but they are the paths of others. Other’s songs to sing, others spells to weave, others charms to hide. There is no learning in the well worn path. Just tourism.

The folkwitch must eschew the path worn by others. Like the fox, must walk against the paths to see the shape of the landscape. We must not just linger at the edge of ancient paths, we must delve into the bush, fight through the bracken, and discover what lies on the other side of the hedge.

Exploration and experimentation should guide those who seek to understand the Craft. Learning through long consideration and careful experimentation which plants yield the correct results. Hearing in the air the voice in the trees that guides you in your quest for understanding. Listening deeply to the forest and the seashore. To the mountain spring and the laughing whisper of the air through an evening meadow. Exploring the landscape that is the center of your practice, knowing well all of those places where footsteps do not go. Seeing as birds and foxes see the landscape; as hedgehogs, rats, and vipers.

The role of discovery is the single most important part of the Craft. The constant learning of new things, of new ways of seeing. Never should one settle for what they already know, growing callous in our beliefs leads to stagnation. We should turn over the leaf, taste the dew, sniff the air.

The Path is a journey. Go places.

How To Work With Hounds

Originally posted by kimiko24

Misconceptions 

1) HOUNDS ARE NOT STUPID

2) YOU ARE NOT THEIR “MASTER

3) THEY HAVE FEELINGS

4) THEY ARE NOT PETS DAMN IT

Types of Hounds

  • Hellhounds: A demonic hound; ‘darker arts’; very good for beginners; can shift to a more human form (may or may not depending on their personal preference); Many varieties (Cerberus, Orthrus, Icarus, Rogue, Etc)
  • Heavenhounds: Angelic Hounds; ‘lighter arts’; has wings; can shift into a humanoid form if desired; takes on different types of dogs; can be good for beginners
  • Cu Sidhe (Irish)  / Cu Sith (Scottish): Faery Hounds; normally green, brown, or white; Appears normally as either an Irish Wolfhound, a Wolf, or a Greyhound; Beginners be cautious but not like, paranoid
  • Cwn Annwn: The Hounds of The Celtic God Arawn ; Grey; DO NOT CONTACT UNLESS YOU WORK WITH ARAWN / WANT TO WORK WITH HIM
  • Grim: Hounds of Death; Guardians; ‘darker arts’; Very Territorial; Intermediate
  • Black Shuck: The Black Dogs of Folklore; Super Sweet; So Nice; Good for Beginners
  • Gwyllgi: Welsh; ‘Dark Arts’; 50/50 shot; Caution; Intermediate+; Appear as a black dog or a mastiff
  • Barghest: Large Dog; Sharp claws, Toxic Teeth; Actually Really Nice; ‘Dark arts’; Intermediate
  • Madrai Dryads: Hounds who live in trees; My personal discovery; Brown with green eyes; leave trails of dirt where they walk; info post soon; sweet but shy; beginner friendly
  • Werewolves: Humanoid Shifters; Shift either at will or with the moon phases/extreme anger; man buns for dayyyyyyyyyyyyyyys; beginner friendly sometimes, use caution
  • Familiars: Spirits of animals passed on; very chill; I would recommend these for anyone. {I have a wolf I got from a shop and she is the sweetest thing ever <3 )
  • Celestial Hounds: The Hounds of The Stars; Very spacey; They glow; harder to contact

How To Bond

  • Spend time with them and their vessel
  • Talk to them
  • Do fun things with them
  • Draw them
  • Give Them Food
  • Cuddle
  • Etc

Things That Help (No Seriously, I Wish I Would Have Been Told This Stuff)

1) Get A Damn Pendulum, this is the easiest way to communicate with any spirit, is user friendly, and very inconspicuous

2) Be patient. Do not fucking get mad when they mess up, explain why thats not ok or how it should be done

3) Set house rules, but don’t be a dictator about it

4) Develop a Mom™ Voice (I mean this in a gender neutral way, but you know that voice that your mom used that made you feel compelled to do what she asked or tell her what she wanted to know? Yeah, develop one of those. Its helped me so many times its not even funny. (it actually is kinda funny tbh)

5) Vessels aren’t supposed to be an uncomfortable trap for your companion, its supposed to make it easier to feel them and connect with them. Ask to make sure their binding (if they have one) doesn’t hurt them. If it does contact the shop you got them from, break the binding you did, or have someone else (like me) break the binding and redo it. (IF YOU GOT THEM FROM A SHOP PLEASE CONTACT THAT SHOP FIRST, I don’t like stepping on other peoples work unless they refuse to help, EVERY SHOP SHOULD / WILL WANT TO KNOW IF THEIR BINDING IS INFLICTING PAIN.)


If you need help contacting any of the above mentioned spirits, please message me and I would be glad to help you 

Shapeshifter Aesthetic ; requested by anon

Shapeshifters are beings that have the ability to transform into other living things. In some lore they have to kill the thing they are assuming the shape of before hand, and in others it is an ability cast on an object using a spell or magic. The most popular version of shapeshifting is that of a person into an animal, and vice versa.