black and white stereotypes

Stereotyped vs Nuanced Characters and Audience Perception

Writing with color receives many questions regarding the stereotypes Characters of Color and their story lines may possess.

There’s a difference between having a three-dimensional character with trait variance and flaws, versus one who walks the footsteps of a role people of their race/ethnicity are constantly put into. Let’s discuss this, as well as how sometimes, while there’s not much issue with the character, a biased audience will not allow the character to be dimensional.

But first: it’s crucial to consider the thinking behind your literary decisions.

Trace your Logic 

When it comes to the roles and traits you assign your characters, it’s important to ask yourself why you made them the way they are. This is especially true for your marginalized characters.

So you need an intimidating, scary character. What does intimidating look like on first brainstorm? Is it a Black man, large in size or presence? (aka a Scary Black Man) A Latino with trouble with the law? If so, why?

Really dig, even as it gets uncomfortable. You’ll likely find you’re conditioned to think of certain people in certain roles on the spot.

It’s a vicious cycle; we see a group of people represented a certain way in media, and in our own works depict them in the way we know. Whether you consciously believe it’s the truest depiction of them all or not, we’re conditioned to select them for these roles again and again. Actors of Color report on being told in auditions they’re not performing stereotypical enough and have been encouraged to act more “ethnic.” 

This ugly merry-go-round scarcely applies to (cis, straight) white people as they are allowed a multitude of roles in media. Well, then again, I do notice a funny trend of using white characters when stories need a leader, a hero, royalty, a love interest…

Today’s the day to break free from this preconditioned role-assigning.

Keep reading

remember that time the supergirl writers decided to change kara’s love interest from a really interesting sensitive black man (and even addressed the whole angry black man stereotype) to a white prince of a planet that owned slaves and thought that was a transition fans would support? 

White People: *constantly generalize Black People while actively participate in projecting hateful, racist, and dangerous stereotypes consciously or subconsciously*

Black People: “White People are racist.“

White People: "Hmmm, maybe it’s not my racist actions that are wrong…. but, instead, it’s you calling me a racist which is actually racist. Words hurt :((((”
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PLEASE SHARE THIS! So you adopt a Black male, then Snap a photo of him, post it online while calling him thuggish and I’m suppose to think that’s cute. While we have hundreds of black men even our little boys gunned down because white people like you are thinking of them as thugs and not people. No white person will be able to replace a black parental figure and that is the black ass bottom line. PLEASE SHARE! I came across this photo thanks to godgazi ! black-culture afrodesiacworldwide allthingsblackwomen whitepeoplesaidwhat whitegirlsaintshit whiteguiltconfessionals reverseracism thisiseverydayracism thoughtsofablackgirl takingbackourculture theangryblack yung-medusa youngblackandvegan uncle-tomfoolery officialprincessofzamounda susiethemoderator fuckyeahnaturalhair knowledgeequalsblackpower lookthroughmylookingglass naturalblkgirlsrock

Black people are never allowed to feel or do anything without white people trying to invalidate us.

When we mourn our fallen brothers and sisters, here comes Becky and Conner to shout “all lives matter”. When we succeed, Smith Ann, who refuses to acknowledge that she benefits from white privilege, comes through to tell us we only made it because we are a minority, not because we worked hard. When we get angry, good ol’ Ethan decides to label us as “ghetto”. When black people call out the injustices we face in this country because of the color of our skin, Greg and Jenny have to chime in with the “everything is not about race” argument. John will mourn and respect the Holocaust, but will turn around tell black people to get over slavery. Beatrice can be pressed, yell, and be upset when her pumpkin spice latte is not made correctly, but black people can’t be upset when we are followed around the store because somebody thinks we are stealing.

Unless you have lived a black life, you cannot tell black people how to feel. Stop trying to invalidate us. 

Reasons for Everyone to Watch “Dear White People”

1. Learn how even Black people who “do everything right” and get into a top college still struggle to find their place and be truly accepted into it

2. Learn and recognize that homophobia is a problem in every community even ours

3. Learn a little bit about colorism (Coco vs Sam)

4. Learn how (yes I’ll say it) Black people can be racist and stereotype others

5. How some White people can be better allies to Black people than other Black people

6. Classism within the Black community (”good” black vs “bad” black)

7. Learn how revolutions require different avenues of protest

8. Learn why if someone calls you racist (classist, homophobic, etc.) to reflect on your own attitudes and biases

9. Learn that although we can all be “racist,” some beliefs are way more dangerous than others and should be treated as such (cracker vs nigger)

10. Just to stay woke

isn’t it fucking wonderful to know that a stupid white girl can become famous and go on talk shows for acting like a “ratchet” and “ghetto” black woman but when actual black women act this way, we get killed, ostracized, have shitty stereotypes assigned to us and basically be called trash? isn’t that fucking amazing to know that our “ghettoness” can be commodified by ANYONE but US?
Reasons to watch Leverage

Eliot Spencer

Eliot Spencer

eLIOT MOTHERFUCKING SPENCER

Ahem. Right.

Also:

- Found family trope, which I will never get tired of in a million years

- You know that post asking for a series with a dark, fucked up, tragic beginning that gradually gets happier when the series progresses? Leverage is basically that. Four out of the five main characters have pasts that range from ‘Mildly sad and lonely’ to ‘Holy shit you’re fucked up’, but the show takes that and then makes them better. There’s no gritty downspiral, no one gets killed for shock value, it’s an action series that’s actually fun. 

- Did I mention it is hilarious? Because it is. Really. Friggin’. Funny.

- Broody man getting called out on his broody man-ness

- Broody man having an awesome ex-wife who has moved on from the divorce, still cares about her ex-husband but is not bitter and also does not get jealous but instead becomes friends with ex-husbands new partner.

- No. Annoying. Love. Triangles. Just one glorious OT3.

- Ladies telling dudes they need more time before embarking on anything romantic and then getting as long as they need without anyone pressuring them into something they’re not ready for.

- Basically: HEALTHY RELATIONSHIP DEVELOPMENT

- The resident nerd is not a stereotypical white boi geek, but a rather buff and very attractive black man. You know who is a stereotypical white boi geek? The villain.

- Not only relatable heroes, but relatable villains. I mean, everyone has been screwed over at least once by the type of scumbags portrayed in Leverage, so watching them getting taken for everything they own gives me tingles. Tingles of vindication.

- There’s one episode with two female leads that’s basically ‘Fuck the Bechdel test we’ve got criminals to catch’

But seriously, just go watch it for this glorious goober right here:

What white kids think is racist

  1. black kids speaking against racism 
  2. Black kids calling them out because they are racist 
  3. Black kids getting mad at the system
  4. Black kids fed up with being stereotyped
  5. Black Kids making jokes about white people 

What white kids don’t find racist 

  1. The N word 
  2. Black Face 
  3. Police killing an unarmed black teenager 
Witchy Beginner Guide/FAQ

  I’ve had this blog for about 2 years now, and I’ve noticed that Tumblr has a large population of beginner and often ‘closeted’ witches. Of course, it’s a seemingly perfect place for a sprouting witch to turn to, with an interactive community and boundless fountains of information. I’ve been asked just about every question in the book, and I do my best to answer them. However, there was one question that persisted in my inbox, that I frequently ignored due to the mere vastness of the topic. So, finally, here is my panacea for the swarm of newbie asks.

*This does not mean you cannot ask me questions about these topics! If you feel something wasn’t covered or might be different to your situation, feel free to ask. However, I will probably link you to this if your question is directly addressed.*

Frequently Asked Questions

How do I know if I’m a witch?

The title of a witch is chosen, not born. While certain signs may push you towards a certain diety or spiritual path, the ultimate choice to begin practicing witchcraft is a choice and often happens over time and consideration rather than an all at once ‘initiation.’

Do I have to be Wiccan to practice witchcraft?

Nope! Wicca, or any other religion for that matter, does not own the practice of witchcraft. It is not a closed practice (though certain aspects can be, and are therefor not witchcraft, such as smudging) meaning anyone can practice.

What is paganism?

Paganism, or pagan religions, are religions that are not majorly practiced. It is sometimes used by Christians to identify non-Christians. Paganism is not one religion, but rather an umbrella term for many;.

What are the basic things I need to do a spell?

While Tumblr likes to glamourize spells and the craft with fancy shots of big geodes and perfectly angled teacups, all you really need is intention and your hands. Some easily obtainable things that might help you start are jars, herbs that double as cooking ingredients, candles, notebooks, twigs that double as wands, and boxes. Moon water is a pretty easy first thing to make, and can spice up spells that call for water. In reality, the most important part of a spell is your intention.

Are curses bad?

With the growth of Wicca has come the growth of the term 'white magic,’ and the idea that karma will send your ass to witch hell if you so much as utter poor fortune upon a wrongdoer, let alone use your craft against them. The reality is, no witch should be shamed for their personal choice is magic. Also, for beginners, the terms 'white/black’ magic are associated with racial stereotypes. Try substituting it for negative/positive energy.

How do you start witchcraft?

Just…start. Just go for it. Collect a rock you like on the street, make a potion, read a book about witches. Little things that turn into action. My biggest tip is to start by dedicating a journal to your craft, which will later turn into your Grimoire of sorts, and can help you keep track of your beliefs and how you’ve grown spiritually.

How do you start being Wiccan?

It is popular to start Wicca with an initiation ritual, though not required. Because Wicca is a religion, it’s usually typical to at least do some sort of spell acknowledging and presenting yourself to the deities.

Is Hekate the Wiccan goddess?

Nope. No no! Very common mistake. Hekate isn’t even technically a tri or multiple layered goddess! Hekate also does not aline with Wicca’s core values.

What religion is witchcraft associated with?

None! Witchcraft is an accessory to religions, and belongs to none impartcular.

Top 10 Tips For Beginners

1) There is no singular right or wrong way. Trying to mimic somebody else’s path will only result in dead ends and frustration. Don’t be afraid to try something you’ve never seen done.

2) Don’t force yourself to align with a religion or patron deity. While it may feel comforting to have a god or goddess there for you, if you aren’t prepared to maintain a relationship with one or you don’t really have any interest in them, remember that it’s okay to go solo.

3) Use what you have available. There is no need to spend tens or twenties of dollars on fancy, decorative things. Jars are available for cheap at the dollarstore, and tealight candles are great for starting out.

4) Don’t feel the need to justify your practice with “I only do the positive kind of magic” or “it’s not like…Satanism or anything…” Be confident in your craft. Come out of the 'broom closet’ when you’re ready.

5) Don’t feel like you have to choose to be a 'kind of witch.’ Hardly anyone I know only practices a single 'type’ of magic.

6) Give yourself space to grow. Tumblr makes everything seem awfully black and white, and tiny mistakes can be blown up into death threats. Educate yourself to the best of your ability, acknowledge when you messup, and learn from everything.

7) Spend time in nature! Go hiking, or if you’re a city witch, just take a stroll down the street. Humans are nature. Get outside, is all that matters. Nature is everywhere.

8) Starting a journal to track your beliefs, progress, interests, and attempted spells will make things so much simpler! Plus, it’s fun to look back on when you become more experienced and see how much you’ve changed. The book doesn’t have to be anything fancy. My first was an old composition book.

9) Ask questions. Ask stupid questions. Ask questions you think might be offensive. Bother witches with questions over and over until you get a clear answer.

10) Find magic in the little things, not just grand spells and big holidays or full moons. Find magic in getting dressed, or cleaning, or even driving.

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This is still undergoing some editing and adding to, but I hope it helps someone :)

Much love!

@nature-is-punk

Originally posted by myfoxesandroses

Things I’m sick of

  • Asians being ignored in racial discussions or even worse, lumped in with whites as if we were essentially the same
  • The utter lack of education on Asian directed hostility that has been a continued issue in the united states ever since we first started coming here.
  • People treating all race issues as just Black vs White
  • The assumption that since Asians have the  stereotypes of being smart, docile, and nonthreatening, that we lack a struggle other minorities have
  • The hypersexualization of Asian women and the complete desexualization of Asian men
  • How almost all asian representation in media is accompanied with an accent, and rarely breaks from the stereotypes