black american

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The Muslim community is mourning the passing of Nabra, a 17 year old young woman from Sterling, VA. Nabra was beaten to death with a baseball bat and left in a pond after going missing while walking to a mosque with her friends. Hate crime against Muslim Americans is at its highest point with more than 67% increase since 2016. Nabra is another example of the escalating violence towards Muslims Americans. Activists gathered at Union Square to hold a vigil for Nabra and her family and to stand against violence against Muslim Americans. 

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Nursing textbook claims direct eye contact with African-Americans is “aggressive behavior”

  • A nursing textbook is causing a stir online for the startlingly racist and xenophobic claims it makes about many racial and ethnic groups. 
  • The book, Journey Across the Life Span: Human Development and Health Promotion, was written by Elaine Polan and Daphne Taylor and published by F.A. Davis Company in January 2015.
  • The controversial passages grabbed public attention Thursday after Jazmine Lattimore, a student at Galen College of Nursing, posted photos on Facebook from a section on giving medical care to African-Americans.
  • Direct eye contact in this culture can be considered a form of aggression,” the passage reads. 
  • The rest of the book reads like a travel guide for racist aliens interested in visiting planet Earth. It offers a chapter on Hispanic Americans claiming nurses should avoid eye contact with them, too, since it’s interpreted as giving the “evil eye.” 
  • The book inaccurately claims Arab-Americans believe “illness is seen as a punishment for sin, and death is seen as God’s will.”
  •  This claim is equally off-base when it comes to Muslims. According to Islamic tradition, illness is often seen as a trial or an opportunity to forgive one’s sins — not a punishment for committing sins. Read more (8/11/17)

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Can we talk about American Gods? We really have a dark-skin black woman playing a Biblical Queen and a Love Goddess. We have Black People portraying Egyptian Gods. The lead of the show is black. They have West African Gods being portrayed on mainstream media. Seeing black people’s mythology and history represented on screen by black actors is a big thing. People aren’t even aware of nor regard the several figures in Abrahamic religions being African. .

Black Girls Classics

The Playlist Series: African American/Black American Weddings, The First Dance

Requested By: riamonaee15

Etta James: At Last
K-Ci & JoJo: All My Life
Whitney Houston: I Will Always Love You
John Legend: Stay With You
Patti LaBelle: If Only You Knew
SWV: You’re Always On My Mind
The Isley Brothers: For the Love of You
John Legend: You & I
Beyonce: Halo
Faith Evans: I Love You
Four Tops/Whitney Houston: I Believe In You and Me
Tammi Terrel & Marvin Gaye/Cheryl Lynn & Luther Vandross: If This World Were Mine
Anita Baker: Sweet Love
Percy Sledge: When a Man Loves a Woman
New Edition: Can You Stand the Rain
Rufus & Chaka Khan: Sweet Thing
Jill Scott: He Loves Me
Nat King Cole & Natalie Cole: Unforgettable
Whitney Houston: You Give Good Love
Jaheim: Anything
Rose Royce: Wishing on A Star
Ginuwine: Differences
The O'Jays: Stairway to Heaven
Mariah Carey: When I Saw You
Aaliyah: At Your Best (You Are Love)
Dru Hill: These Are the Times
Babyface: Every Time I Close My Eye
Brian McKnight: Back At One
Minne Riperton: Loving You
India Arie: Ready For Love
Troop: All I Do Is Think of You
Prince: Adore
Kindred The Family: Where Would I be
Chaka Khan: Through the Fire
Jagged Edge: Promise
Dondria: You’re the One
Kevon Edmonds: 24/7
Kem: I Can’t Stop Loving You
Stevie Wonder/Luther Vandross/Donell Jones: Knocks Me Off My Feet
Tony! Toni! Tone!: Whatever You Want
Musiq Soulchild: Dontchange
Beyonce: Speechless
Seal: Kiss From A Rose
Case: Happily Ever After
Kem: Share My Life
Keyshia Cole: Love
Gerald Levert: Made to Love You
Musiq Soulchild: Love
The Deele: Two Occasions
Mawell: Fortunate
Xscape: The Arms of the One Who Loves You
India Arie: The Truth
Tendy Pendergrass: Love T.K.O
Kenny Lattimore: For You
SWV: Weak
Musiq Soulchild: sobeautiful
Mariah Carey: Vision of Love
Aretha Franklin: You’re All I Need
Gladys Kinght & The Pimps: Best Thing That Happened to Me
Beyonce: Rather Die Young
Luther Vandross: Here and Now
Pressure: Love And Affection
Heatwave/Luther Vandross: Always & Forever
Chaka Khan: Ain’t Nobody
John Legend: All of Me
Alicia Keys: If I Ain’t Got You
Luther Vandross: All The Woman I Need
Ruff Endz: Someone to Love You
Stevie Wonder: You and I
Beyonce: Dangerously In Love
Avant & Keye Wyatt: You & I
Shanice: I Love Your Smile
Maria Carey: Open Arms
Musiq Soulchild: Teachme
Roberta Flack & Donny Hathaway/Beyonce & Luther Vandross: The Closer I Get to You
John Legend: P.D.A. (We Just Don’t Care)
Stevie Wonder: Signed, Sealed Delivered (I’m Yours)
Atlantic Starr: Always
Luther Vandross & Mariah Care: Endless Love
Blackstreet: Let’s Stay in Love
John Legend: So High
Lionel Richie & Diana Ross: Endless Love
Whitney Houston: Greatest Love of All
Mariah Carey: Underneath the Stars
Jagged Edge: Good Luck Charm

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So sweet Kim porter takes her girls on a girls trip #motherhood 👧🏾👧🏾👧🏽👩🏾🌞

alluringbutterfly  asked:

Do you all know anything about the Gullah people?

Funny story, lol I 1st learned about the Gullah people after watching Gullah Gullah Island as a child (please tell me you remember otherwise i feel old). I didn’t fully understand the culture and motive behind the show until last fall in my African Retentions in American course in college.

So here goes:

The Gullah people are the descendants of the slaves who worked on the rice plantations in South Carolina and Georgia. They still live in rural communities in the coastal region and on the Sea islands of those two states, and they still retain many elements of African language and cultureMany traditions of the Gullah and Geechee culture were passed from one generation to the next through language, agriculture, and spirituality. The culture has been linked to specific West African ethnic groups who were enslaved on island plantations to grow rice, indigo, and cotton starting in 1750, when antislavery laws ended in the Georgia colony.

A Board of Trustees established Georgia in 1732 with the primary purposes of settling impoverished British citizens and creating a mercantile system that would supply England with needed agricultural products. The colony enacted a 1735 antislavery law, but the prohibition was lifted in 1750. West Africans, the argument went, were far more able to cope with the climatic conditions found in the South. And, as the growing wealth of South Carolina’s rice economy demonstrated, slaves were far more profitable than any other form of labor available to the colonists.

Rice plantations fostered Georgia’s successful economic competition with other slave-based rice economies along the eastern seaboard. Coastal plantations invested primarily in rice, and plantation owners sought out Africans from the Windward Coast of West Africa (Senegambia [later Senegal and the Gambia], Sierra Leone, and Liberia), where rice, indigo, and cotton were indigenous to the region. Over the ensuing centuries, the isolation of the rice-growing ethnic groups, who re-created their native cultures and traditions on the coastal Sea Islands, led to the formation of an identity recognized as Geechee/Gullah. There is no single West African contribution to Geechee/Gullah culture, although dominant cultural patterns often correspond to various agricultural investments. For example, Africa’s Windward Coast was later commonly referred to as the Rice Coast in recognition of the large numbers of Africans enslaved from that area who worked on rice plantations in America.

Documentation of the developing culture on the Georgia islands dates to the nineteenth century. By the late twentieth century, researchers and scholars had confirmed a distinctive group and identified specific commonalities with locations in West Africa. The rice growers’ cultural retention has been studied through language, cultural habits, and spirituality. The research of Mary A. Twining and Keith E. Baird in Sea Island Roots: African Presence in the Carolinas and Georgia (1991) investigates the common links of islanders to specific West African ethnicities.

Enslaved rice growers from West Africa brought with them knowledge of how to make tools needed for rice harvesting, including fanner baskets for winnowing rice. The sweetgrass baskets found on thecoastal islands were made in the same styles as baskets found in the rice culture of West Africa. Sweetgrass baskets also were used for carrying laundry and storing food or firewood. Few present-day members of the Geechee/Gullah culture remember how to select palmetto, sweetgrass, and pine straw to create baskets, and the remaining weavers now make baskets as decorative art, primarily for tourists.

Aspects of West African heritage have survived at each stage of the circle of migration, with rice, language, and spirituality persisting as cultural threads into the twentieth century. The Geechee/Gullah culture on the Sea Islandsof Georgia has retained a heritage that spans two continents. Sapelo Island Cultural DayAt the end of the Civil War, lands on the coastal islands were sold to the newly freed Africans during the Port Royal Experiment, part of the U.S. government's Reconstruction plan for the recovery of the South after the war.

During the 1900s, land on some of the islands—Cumberland, Jekyll,Ossabaw, Sapelo, and St. Simons —became resort locations and reserves for natural resources. The modern-day conflict over resort development on the islands presents yet another survival test for the Geechee/Gullah culture, the most intact West African culture in the United States. Efforts to educate the public by surviving members of the Geechee/Gullah community, including Cornelia Bailey of Sapelo Island and the Georgia Sea Island Singers, help to maintain and protect the culture’s unique heritage in the face of such challenges.

The Gullah/Geechee have arguable preserved the heritage of their African ancestors better than any group in the United States.


Cornelia Bailey, with Christena Bledsoe, God, Dr. Buzzard, and the Bolito Man: A Saltwater Geechee Talks about Life on Sapelo Island (New York: Doubleday, 2000).

Margaret Washington Creel, A Peculiar People: Slave Religion and Community-Culture among the Gullahs (New York: New York University Press, 1988).

This Day in History: Juneteenth is the oldest known celebration commemorating the ending of slavery in the United Sates. Dating back to 1865, it was on June 19th that the Union soldiers landed at Galveston, Texas with news that the war had ended and that the enslaved were now free two and a half years after President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation.