bituminize

instagram

yorkshire.fossils This is another look at one of our favourite ammonites, prior to the outer matrix being polished, for those who haven’t seen it. These ‘Cannon ball’ nodules (rocks) are thought to be exclusive to the Yorkshire Coast, found nowhere else in the world. They rarely contain fossils, but when they do, they typically contain an Eleganticeras sp. ammonite. This fossil here is featured as found. Some of the outer chambers were broken open when we cracked open this rock, which allowed a rich smell of bituminous oil to be released.

Leonardo da Vinci, Virgin of the Rocks (National Gallery version) (detail), between 1491 and 1508


“In [da Vinci] first appears the taste for what is bizarre or recherche in landscape; hollow places full of the green shadow of bituminous rocks, ridged reefs of trap-rock which cut the water into quaint sheets of light - their exact antitype is in our own western seas; all the solemn effects of moving water; you may follow it springing from the rocks on the heath of the Madonna of the Balances, passing, as a little fall, into the treacherous calm of the Madonna of the Lake, next, as a goodly river, below the cliffs of the Madonna of the Rocks, washing the white walls of its distant villages, stealing out in a network of divided streams in La Gioconda to the seashore of the Saint-Anne - that delicate place, where the wind passes like the hand of some fine etcher over the surface, and the untorn shells are lying thick upon the sand, and the tops of the rocks, to which the waves never rise, are green with grass, grown fine as hair.” (1)

Keep reading

The Inner Studio, Tenth Street (c.1881-1882). William Merritt Chase (American, 1849-1916). Oil on canvas. Huntington Library.

Chase became a fixture in cosmopolitan New York, occupying a lavishly and exotically appointed studio in the celebrated Tenth Street Studio Building. The bold brushwork Chase had learned in Munich always stayed with him, but shortly after arriving in New York, he abandoned the bituminous dark tones that had also characterized his early style.

instagram

This is a look at one of our favourite ammonites, prior to the outer matrix being polished. These ‘Cannon ball’ nodules (rocks) are thought to be exclusive to the Yorkshire Coast, found nowhere else in the world. They rarely contain fossils, but when they do, they typically contain an Eleganticeras sp. ammonite. This fossil here is featured as found. Some of the outer chambers were broken open when we cracked open this rock, which allowed a rich smell of bituminous oil to be released.

instagram

yorkshire.fossilsThis rock on the foreshore of Saltwick Bay was peppered with tiny pyritised ammonites from the Bituminous shales. Although very attractive we left this for other fossil hunters to find, maybe it resides in somebody’s collection now 

What He Told Me

We knew there was something wrong with him. Something about the way he was sitting. We’d given him a wide berth; the smell alone warranted that. But still, there was a disconcerting amount of tension in the man. I knew I wasn’t the only one worried about the potential for violence he signaled.

Peristaltic ripples of dread pulsed through my gut when the train slowed to a crawl. Another service outage. The train stopped completely, accompanied by the automated message indicating a technical issue and an assurance that we would be moving again soon. At least the lights stayed on this time.

Nervous smalltalk ebbed and flowed. We’d stopped in a bad place. The emergency exits were unobstructed, but they led to a cement wall. The tunnel was excruciatingly narrow and felt claustrophobic, even within the relative roominess of our subway car. We were in the first car of the train. At the front was the locked compartment housing the conductor and her controls, and the rear led to small gap separating our car from the next one in line. The man sat in the corner seats closest to that exit.

Keep reading

2

We’re not sure exactly where she was born, or when she was born, but we know that Mary Harris was from somewhere in Cork County, Ireland, and immigrated to North America with her family as a child to escape the Irish famine. In her early twenties, she moved to Chicago, where she worked as a dressmaker, and then to Memphis, Tennessee, where she met and married George Jones, a skilled iron molder and staunch unionist. The couple had four children.  Then tragedy struck: a yellow fever epidemic in 1867 took the lives of Mary’s husband and all four children. Mary Harris Jones returned to Chicago where she continued to sew, becoming a dressmaker for the wealthy. “I would look out of the plate glass windows and see the poor, shivering wretches, jobless and hungry, walking alongside the frozen lake front,” she said. “The tropical contrast of their condition with that of the tropical comfort of the people for whom I sewed was painful to me. My employers seemed neither to notice nor to care.” Then came the Great Chicago Fire of 1871. Mary once again lost everything.

After the fire, Mary began to travel across the country. The nation was undergoing dramatic change, and industrialization was changing the nature of work. She worked with the Knights of Labor, often giving speeches to inspire the workers during strikes. She organized assistance for workers’ strikes, and prepared for workers’ marches. In June 1897, after Mary addressed the railway union convention, she began to be referred to as “Mother” by the men of the union. The name stuck. That summer, when the 9,000-member Mine Workers called a nationwide strike of bituminous (soft coal) miners and tens of thousands of miners laid down their tools, Mary arrived in Pittsburgh to assist them. She became “Mother Jones” to millions of working men and women across the country for her efforts on behalf of the miners. Mother Jones was so effective the union would send her into mines, to help miners to join unions. In addition to miners, Mother Jones also was very concerned about child workers. To attract attention to the cause of abolishing child labor, in 1903, she led a children’s march of 100 children from the textile mills of Philadelphia to New York City “to show the New York millionaires our grievances.” She led the children all the way to President Theodore Roosevelt’s Long Island home.

A political progressive, she was a founder of the Social Democratic Party in 1898. Mother Jones also helped establish the Industrial Workers of the World in 1905. For all of her social reform and labor activities, she was considered by the authorities to be one of the most dangerous women in America. In 1912, Mother Jones was even charged with a capital offense by a military tribunal in West Virginia and held under house arrest for weeks until popular outrage and national attention forced the governor to release her. In her eighties, Mother Jones settled down near Washington, D.C., in 1921 but continued to travel across the country. She died, possibly aged 100, in 1930.  Her final request was to be buried in the Miners Cemetery in Mt. Olive, Illinois, where you can visit her grave today.

It’s National Lipstick Day!

“Daughter of neighbor applied lipstick in home of Harry Fain, coal miner. Inland Steel Company, Wheelwright #1 & 2 Mines, Wheelwright, Floyd County, Kentucky.”, 9/24/1946

Lee, Russell, 1903-1986, Photographer. Series: Photographs of the Medical Survey of the Bituminous Coal Industry, 1946 - 1947. Record Group 245: Records of the Solid Fuels Administration for War, 1937 - 1948

In 1946 the Department of Interior and the United Mine Workers agreed to a joint survey of medical, health and housing conditions in coal communities to be conducted by Navy personnel. Under the direction of Rear Admiral Joel T. Boone, survey teams went into mining areas to collect data and photographs on the conditions of these regions, later compiled into a published report. The bulk of the photographs were taken by Russell W. Lee, a professional photographer hired by the Department of Interior for this project.

There are currently 1,300 digitized photos from the project now available in the National Archives Catalog.

(Today’s find comes courtesy of @usnatarchives staff member Kirstin Holm, a museum registrar in the Presidential Materials Division.)

I am extremely grateful for each and every generous comment, message and feedback I have received in response to my black books project. Thank you all for the kindness you have extended towards me. The following message, which I received early this morning before I left for work, has left an indelible impression on me and I feel compelled to share it with you all.

I do not know this wonderful human named here on tumblr as

http://flaviobelli.tumblr.com.

But, I am convinced that he is an exquisite writer, thinker, feeler and soul. This is the kind of rare and articulate feedback that all artists hope to receive when sharing deeply personal work…..

“The Black Books look remarkable. A project for your hands and heart, your mind and your eyes. A way to bind leaves of grief. A way to turn the page. As days go by and years fall away so do the pages of a book pass through our consciousness. As we turn a corner so do we turn a page or turn over a new leaf. We come to the new and next chapter of our lives with same expectation and dread we experience in a book. You have chosen well, the making of Black Books. Black; The First Colour. From burned branches. From burned bones and horns. Beautiful bituminous blacks from oil-soaked soils traced on cave walls in the darkness lit by fires. Colour came more slowly to us. The ochres of mud, smeared vegetation and pulverized minerals, and blood. Then there are the Black Paintings by Goya. His private art, at the end of his life, painted directly on the walls of his villa. Those fourteen meditations on madness and death, never meant for the light of day. It is because of Ms-Excuse-Me that I have now followed you and how I come to wish you great success on your book making journey!”

Daughter of Charles B. Lewis, miner, holding her kitten. She is sitting in kitchen of her home in company housing project. Union Pacific Coal Company, Winton Mine, Winton, Sweetwater County, Wyoming.”, 7/10/1946

Lee, Russell, 1903-1986, Photographer. Series: Photographs of the Medical Survey of the Bituminous Coal Industry, 1946 - 1947. Record Group 245: Records of the Solid Fuels Administration for War, 1937 - 1948

In 1946 the Department of Interior and the United Mine Workers agreed to a joint survey of medical, health and housing conditions in coal communities to be conducted by Navy personnel. Under the direction of Rear Admiral Joel T. Boone, survey teams went into mining areas to collect data and photographs on the conditions of these regions, later compiled into a published report. The bulk of the photographs were taken by Russell W. Lee, a professional photographer hired by the Department of Interior for this project.

There are currently 1,300 digitized photos from the project now available in the National Archives Catalog.

Happy Groundhog Day!

Daughter of miner with pet ground hog. Dixie Darby Fuel Company, Marne Mine, Lejunior, Harlan County, Kentucky., 09/13/1946.

Russell Lee, Photographer. From the Department of the Interior’s series: Photographs of the Medical Survey of the Bituminous Coal Industry

(Possibly one of the cutest records in usnatarchives’ holdings?)

Happy Groundhog Day!

Daughter of miner with pet ground hog. Dixie Darby Fuel Company, Marne Mine, Lejunior, Harlan County, Kentucky., 09/13/1946.

Russell Lee, Photographer.  From the Department of the Interior’s series: Photographs of the Medical Survey of the Bituminous Coal Industry

Possibly one of the cutest records in usnatarchives’ holdings, this cuddly “Marmota monax” goes by a few other names.  What do you call them? Woodchuck? Groundhog? Whistle-pig? Land-beaver? Varmint?

Saturday afternoon street scene. Welch, McDowell County, West Virginia., 8/24/1946

Lee, Russell, 1903-1986, Photographer. Series: Photographs of the Medical Survey of the Bituminous Coal Industry, 1946 - 1947. Record Group 245: Records of the Solid Fuels Administration for War, 1937 - 1948

In 1946 the Department of Interior and the United Mine Workers agreed to a joint survey of medical, health and housing conditions in coal communities to be conducted by Navy personnel. Under the direction of Rear Admiral Joel T. Boone, survey teams went into mining areas to collect data and photographs on the conditions of these regions, later compiled into a published report. The bulk of the photographs were taken by Russell W. Lee, a professional photographer hired by the Department of Interior for this project.

There are currently 1,300 digitized photos from the project now available in the National Archives Catalog.

aterribleterriblefate  asked:

Hey Doug, in response to your "3 things people should experience" post, I thought you'd be happy to know I once managed the almost impossible while using the "Chaos Reigns" Planechase deck. After casting Maelstrom Wanderer and cascading into something insignificant, The second cascade hit Enigma Sphinx, which hit Enlisted Wurm, which hit Bituminous Blast, which hit Bloodbraid Elf, which hit Shardless Agent. I know I'll never see it happen again, but boy, was it satisfying! :D

Oh my gosh. I’ve never done a chain that long, but I’m glad someone has!

prsntypething  asked:

I'm the one who gave you slave of bolas!

Alright! Excellent. 

I’ll be rolling out these Magic stories over the next few days. This morning, it’s time for Slave of Bolas!

I’ve had fun relating the cards I’ve been given to stories, so let’s see here… Well, Slave of Bolas is from Shards of Alara block - and boy, do I have a story that ties into that format.

The year is 2009. (Five years ago - which is kind of crazy to say!) My trusty Spellstutter Sprites - the same set which would eventually qualify me for 4 different Pro Tours is 4 different formats - had just led me to a top 16 finish at Grand Prix Los Angeles.  And just like that, I was off to the Pro Tour!

And where better to go to the Pro Tour than HAWAII?

This was the second Pro Tour Hawaii, and after hearing all of the awesome stories from the first I couldn’t wait to head there. 

After skipping the first Pro Tour I qualified for, the first Pro Tour I actually played in, Pro Tour Berlin, hadn’t gone so well - I was one win out of making day 2. But this time was going to be different. I spent every day for weeks testing for this Pro Tour, determined to crack the format.

The problem was that the format was Shards of Alara Block Constructed, which was, in the opinion of me and many of the players, one of the worst Block Constructed formats of all time. It very quickly became apparent that it was defined by the cascade cards in Alara Reborn, and a huge majority of the decks were just Jund variants.

Did you want to play Jund? Well, welcome to a million mirror matches. Of course, you could try and get an advantage by splashing white for Enlisted Wurm and trying to cast “Enlisted Ultimatum” - the ‘ol Enlisted Wurm cascading into Bituminous Blast, cascading into Bloodbraid Elf, cascading into Blightning. If you were really going rogue, you could try playing more white sources and Elspeth.

Yeah.

I tried to make several different non-Jund centric decks work - Naya, Bant, control - but it was pretty clear by the end of it that Jund was just the best. (The one deck I didn’t get to, but wished I would have, was the Esper deck that Kibler and his team played - but I digress.)

I wasn’t able to fly into Hawaii early to test because of college - though fortunately, my teachers are very cool about me missing a couple days in the middle of finals for me to head to Hawaii. I even have the following conversation with one of my teachers:

“So, uh, Brandon, I’m not going to be here Wednesday, Thursday or Friday. Can I make up the test and class somehow?”

“Hmm… What are you doing anyway?”

“Well, I qualified for a Magic: the Gathering Pro Tour in Hawaii, and so I’m going to go play for $40,000 and it’s really important that I go an -”

“No way! You play professional Magic? That’s awesome! Go play, man. We’ll figure out your test when you get back. I’ll be watching the coverage at home!”

Yeah, some of my teachers were basically the best.

After weeks of testing to no avail, I finally fly into Hawaii. I have a Jund with white deck that’s okay - but I have a “plan” to use the tried and true method of “talk to people at the player meeting and see if anybody has a better deck to switch into.”

There’s only one problem. I get to the player meeting, and at first everything is going okay. But then, about a quarter of the way through, I start getting a sore throat. And then, that turns into coughing.

It quickly escalates to me standing over a garbage can, holding my chest. 

To quote my testing partner Max McCall: “I have bad news. It looks like you’re going to die.”

I tell all of my teammates through raspy breaths that there’s just no way I can stay at the player meeting. I have to go back to my hotel and rest, or I have no chance of playing in the morning. I’ll just play whatever deck they tell me to - have a sleeved copy ready in the morning and I’ll play.

I think about what I might have, and I’m convinced I have mono. I had just started dating my then-girlfriend (we would end up dating for 4 years) a few weeks before I left, and all of the symptoms lined up. Mono is one thing I had never wanted to pick up because of all the horror stories I had heard and here I was.

With mono.

The night before a Pro tour.

It was nightmare situation.

I go back to my hotel room and have one of the worst, least restful nights of my life. I barely sleep at all, I feel horrible the whole night, and I’m constantly up to use the bathroom. 

Finally, the morning hits. And while I’m feeling at about 15% of my normal self, I am NOT missing this Pro Tour.

So I get up, practically drug myself into a haze on medicine, and head to the site.

I get there, and as my teammates promised, they have a deck ready for me. (I appreciate my Magic friends so much! You guys are awesome.) Barely conscious and unable to talk, I started playing.

I’ll spare you all the gory details, but the short version is that, predictably, I make a ton of play errors, do horribly, don’t make day 2, and leave the site to rest up.

I remain pretty much feeling horrible for the rest of the trip. After a day of rest Sunday is a little better, so I go back to the site and interact with some people, but I’m still feeling pretty awful.

Eventually, everything settles and I head back to Seattle.

I’m still feeling bad, once I get back, and so I go into the doctor’s office to get the inevitable mono diagnosis.

They take all the requisite samples. I wait for a while. And eventually I hear back:

“I’m sorry sir but… we’ve diagnosed you with swine flu. Please, take care to quarantine yourself.”

Oh.

I didn’t have mono. I had the then-brand new swine flu. The “only a handful of cases in America” horrible thing the news had been talking so much about. 

That would explain a lot.

I go home, continue to rest up, and eventually feel better. I don’t think much about it.

About three weeks later, I receive an e-mail that went out to everybody at the Pro Tour from Scott Larabee. It said something akin to this:

“In the weeks after Pro Tour Honolulu, several of our players have reported picking up Swine Flu. It only takes one person for an outbreak to occur, and we’d like to remind all participants of Magic tournaments to be careful to not play while they may have conditions, lest they affect other players.”

I had inadvertently  (at least in part) caused an outbreak of swine flu among pros.

Oops. My bad. 

What better way to spread an illness than to give it to a group of people who travel all over the world and handle cards?

Dear Ebola:

Please don’t infect any Magic pros, 

Signed Sincerely,

Gavin Verhey

January 3 is Drinking Straw Day

Ella Jane Fain (right) daughter of Harry Fain, miner, and her cousin have a coke in soda fountain prior to movie showing. Inland Steel Company, Wheelwright #1 & 2 Mines. Wheelwright, Floyd County, Kentucky., 09/21/1946

Russell Lee, photographer. From the series: Photographs of the Medical Survey of the Bituminous Coal Industry, 1946 - 1947

Child of miner walks down the road. This is all the street there is; there are no garbage collections and trash and garbage lay decaying wherever they land. Southern Coal Corporation, Bradshaw Mine, Bradshaw, McDowell County, West Virginia., 8/27/1946

Lee, Russell, 1903-1986, Photographer. Series: Photographs of the Medical Survey of the Bituminous Coal Industry, 1946 - 1947. Record Group 245: Records of the Solid Fuels Administration for War, 1937 - 1948

In 1946 the Department of Interior and the United Mine Workers agreed to a joint survey of medical, health and housing conditions in coal communities to be conducted by Navy personnel. Under the direction of Rear Admiral Joel T. Boone, survey teams went into mining areas to collect data and photographs on the conditions of these regions, later compiled into a published report. The bulk of the photographs were taken by Russell W. Lee, a professional photographer hired by the Department of Interior for this project.

There are currently 1,300 digitized photos from the project now available in the National Archives Catalog.

“Mabel Stanley who works in company boarding house for miners, makes up miner’s lunches. The Pocahontas Corporation, 33-34, Bishop, Tazewell County, Virginia.”, 8/7/1946

Lee, Russell, 1903-1986, Photographer. Series: Photographs of the Medical Survey of the Bituminous Coal Industry, 1946 - 1947. Record Group 245: Records of the Solid Fuels Administration for War, 1937 - 1948

In 1946 the Department of Interior and the United Mine Workers agreed to a joint survey of medical, health and housing conditions in coal communities to be conducted by Navy personnel. Under the direction of Rear Admiral Joel T. Boone, survey teams went into mining areas to collect data and photographs on the conditions of these regions, later compiled into a published report. The bulk of the photographs were taken by Russell W. Lee, a professional photographer hired by the Department of Interior for this project.

There are currently 1,300 digitized photos from the project now available in the National Archives Catalog.